Grunwald Monument, Krakow

4 out of 5 stars 14 Reviews

Plac Matejki

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  • Grunwald Monument
    by roamer61
  • Grunwald Monument
    by roamer61
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    Grunwald monument.
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  • roamer61's Profile Photo

    Battle of Grunwald

    by roamer61 Written Jun 8, 2013

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    This stunning statue commemorates the victory over the Teutonic Knights in 1410.
    At the top on his horse is the King of Poland Władysław Jagiełło, his sword pointing downwards in his right hand. At the front is his cousin the Lithuanian prince Vytautas (Vitold), who is flanked on either side by victorious soldiers from the joint army. The dead man at the front is Urlich von Jungingen, the Teutonic Order’s Grand Master, who lost his life during the battle.

    This statue was destroyed by the Nazis during WWII. The current statue is a reproduction, cast using sketches and models of the original. Thus, it dates to about 1976.

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    Grunwald Monument

    by GentleSpirit Written Feb 17, 2013

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    Grunwald Monument

    Across from the old city walls you will find the Grunwald Monument which celebrates the defeat of the Teutonic Order by King Władysław Jagiełło at the Battle of Grunwald on July 15, 1410. This battle changed the balance of power in the region and marked the coming out of the Polish-Lithuanian alliance as the predominant military power. King Wladyslaw is the one on the equestrian statue. The monument was destroyed by the Nazis but reconstructed in 1976.

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  • Askla's Profile Photo

    A model of the medieval centre.

    by Askla Updated Dec 3, 2012

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    In Pl. Matejki, between the St. Florian's Church and the Grunwald Monument, there is a model of the medieval city centre of Krakow.

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    The Grunwald Monument.

    by Askla Updated Dec 3, 2012

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    The Grunwald Monument was erected to commemorate the battle of Grunwald on July 15, 1410 when king Wladyslaw II Jagiello led his Polish-Lithuanian troopes to a victory which showed to be the starting point of the decline of the Teutonic Order. The battle is said to have been the largest medieval battle in Europe with around 70.000 men fighting. It lasted for ten hours, leaving the Teutonic grand master Ulrich von Jungingen dead and the teutonic Knights defeated.
    On my first picture you can see the grand master lying dead in front of the king's horse.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Grunwald Monument

    by Martin_S. Written Jan 4, 2012
    Grunwald Monument, Krakow, Poland

    This grand monument, built to commemorate the Battle of Grunwald (occured in 1410), was only put up in 1910...that is a long time to wait to commemorate something.
    Apparently it was destroyed by the Nazi's during their occupation of Poland and was then rebuilt in 1976.
    If you would like to know more precise details of the history, go to -

    http://www.cracow.travel/guide-to-krakow/let-s-visit/kleparz-and-piasek/action,get,id,4779,t,Grunwald-Monument.html

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    The Grunwald Monument

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 17, 2010

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    Grunwald Monument - Krak��w
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    Only the name itself - Grunwald - trickers one's curiosity.

    This monument, originally named the King Jagiello monument, was erected in 1910 to commemorate the July 15, 1410 Battle of Grunwald. That battle known as the first Battle of Tannenberg was fought during the Polish–Lithuanian–Teutonic War. The alliance of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, led respectively by King Jogaila (Wldyslw Jagiell and Grand Duke Vytautas (Witold), defeated the Teutonic Knights, led by Grand Master Ulrich von Jungingen.

    The original monument was a gift of the Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski and was sculpted by Antoni Wiwulski.

    During World War II under the German occupation the monument - a symbol of Polish patrotism - first was shielded and later demolished. Polish workers succeeded in hiding important parts of the monument, like King Jagiello's scepter and sword, the coats of arms of Poland, Lithuania, Zmudz and the head of Grand Duke Witold.

    In 1972 the reconstruction of the monument started managed by sculptor Marian Konieczny. It took four years of research and rebuilding to finish the project.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    The Grunwald Battle Monument

    by toonsarah Written Jun 15, 2010

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    Grunwald Battle Monument
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    Just beyond St Florian’s Gate and the Barbican is Matejko Square (Plac Matejki in Polish), its centre dominated by the Grunwald Battle Monument commemorating the battle in 1410 when Polish and Lithuanian forces defeated the Teutonic Knights. This is regarded as the most important victory in the history of Poland and Lithuania, and has been seen as a symbol of the country’s struggle against invaders and a source of national pride

    The monument was designed by Polish sculptor Antoni Wiwulski, and funded by the pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski. It has a chequered history. It was unveiled in 1910, on the 500th anniversary of the battle, as part of nationwide patriotic celebrations. But during World War Two the Nazis used the story of the battle to their own ends, portraying these Teutonic Knights as heroes. Unsurprisingly, the Grunwald Battle Monument was vandalized right at the start of the war and later blown up. After the war ended it was decided to reconstruct it, but for many years only an empty memorial plinth stood here. The present monument, a replica (by Marian Konieczny) of the original, was erected in October 1976.

    The sculpture on top of the monument is of King Wladyslaw Jagiello. On the front dais is the Lithuanian Prince Witold and at his feet, defeated in battle, the Teutonic Grand Master, Ulrich von Jungingen.

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  • Durfun's Profile Photo

    A monument to hearten spirits

    by Durfun Updated Mar 2, 2010

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    Taken from moving bus; far better shots follow :)
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    We passed this monument by bus from the airport into the city. Looked imposing so I took this photo. Could always research about it later ;)

    The monument's large architectural plinth is surmounted by an equestrian bronze statue of King Jagiello. It faces the Barbican, a medieval fortification, and the Florian Gate behind it.

    This was a gift to the City and the Nation from Ignacy Jan Paderewski, a world renowned pianist. Out of patriotism, he had commissioned the 60 feet tall monument, entirely at his own expense, from Polish sculptor Antoni Wiwulski, then resident in Paris.

    Other bronze figures adorn the sides of the monument: at the front is that of Grand Duke Witold of Lithuania and below him the figure of the fallen Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, Ulrich von Jungingen; on the plinth's left side a group of Lithuanian warriors and on its right side, a group of Polish warriors. At the back of the monument stands a figure of a peasant breaking his bonds.

    The words "To the glory of our forefather 1410 - To our brothers to hearten their spirits 1910" were inscribed on the plinth.

    On July 15, 1910, the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Grunwald, the City of Krakow saw the unveiling of what was originally named the King Jagiello monument, but came to be universally known as the Grunwald monument.

    The city came under German invasion in September 1939. Having occupied Poland, the Germans could not countenance the continued existence of the monument, both as a symbol of Polish national pride and a painful reminder to the Germans of a stunning defeat. By November, the Germans had surrounded the monument with a palisade of wooden planks hiding it from view.

    Demolition activities lasted till April 1940, the bronze being conveyed to foundries to be utilized for war equipment, the granite blocks being conveyed to distant sites. Poles made to work on the demolition managed to hide and save King Jagiello's scepter and sword, the coats of arms of Poland, Lithuania, and the head of Grand Duke Witold.

    With the end of the conflict in 1945, citizens of Krakow wanted the monument rebuilt. However it wasn't until 1972 that the reconstruction project got underway.

    The reconstructed monument was eventually assembled in 1976 and ceremoniously unveiled on October 16 of that year.

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  • evona's Profile Photo

    Grunwald Monument

    by evona Updated Feb 16, 2009

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    On the Matejko Square there in the middle you can see the big Grunwald Monument from 1910 year. The square is surrounded by some great houses: Academy of Fine Arts, Polish Bank and Industrial-Commercial House.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    grunwald monument

    by doug48 Written May 28, 2008

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    grunwald monument

    this statue of king wladyslaw jagiello was sculpted by antoni wiwulski to commemorate his victory over the teutonic knights in 1410. the dead figure at the base of the statue is grand master ulrich von jugingen. this monument was destroyed by the nazis in 1939 and was reconstructed in 1975.

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Battle of Grunwald Monument

    by von.otter Updated Aug 29, 2006

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    Battle of Grunwald Monument, 2.Jan.1999
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    On 15.July.1410 the armies of Poland and Lithuania led by King Wladyslaw Jagiello defeated the Teutonic Knights. The 10-hour battle was played out on the Battlefield of Grunwald in northern Poland.

    Each side had assembled 30,000 men, making it one of the largest Mediaeval battles. In the end the Teutonic Knights had 11,000 knights killed and 14,000 taken prisoner; their leader, the Grand Master Urlich von Jungingen, was dead.

    This high point in Polish history put an end to the advance through northeastern Europe by the Teutonic Knights; and is memorialized in the Grunwald Monument.

    On 15.July.1910, the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Grunwald, the monument was unveiled. It was a grand and patriotic occasion, attended by 160,000 people. The monument was a gift to city and the nation from the pianist/composer Jan Paderewski. He commissioned the 60-foot-tall monument, paid for out of his own pocket, from Antoni Wiwulski, a Polish sculptor.

    Following the Nazi invasion on 1.September.1939, this symbol of Polish pride and a painful reminder of a major German defeat could not be tolerated. In two months the monument had been surrounded by wooden planks. By April 1940 it had been completely dismantled: the bronze had been melted down; the granite blocks had been dispersed. But Poles force to work on the demolition had hidden various bronze pieces, including King Jagiello's scepter and sword, and the Polish and Lithuanian coats of arms. When the war ended in 1945 Krakow's citizens resolved to rebuild the monument.

    Reconstruction began in 1972 under the direction of sculptor Marian Konieczny, from Krakow's Academy of Fine Arts. The original molds used for casting the bronze pieces were long gone. A plaster model of the monument, sketches and documentations of the original were used as guides. The reconstructed monument was completed in 1976 and unveiled on the 16th of October 1976.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Grunwald monument (Pomnik Grunwaldzki)

    by filipdebont Written May 30, 2005

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    Grunwald monument

    In the middle of Plac Matejki there is a big monument. This statue is the Grunwald monument

    It is gift from Jan Paderewski (musician and statesman) for the remembrance of King Wladyslaw Jagiello, who defeated the knights of the Teutonian Order near Grunwald in 1410.

    Just in front of this Grunwald monument there is the tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

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  • ginte's Profile Photo

    Grunwald monument

    by ginte Updated Oct 24, 2004

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    This monument was designed by Marian Konieczny and erected to mark the 500th anniversary of the victory over the Teutonic Knights.

    The equestrian figure of King Wladyslaw Jagiello is surrounded by figures of the Lithuanian Prince Witold, the defeated Grand Master and Polish and Lithuanian Knights.

    The monument was destroyed by the Nazis during World War II but it was returned to its place after reconstruction in 1976.

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  • coceng's Profile Photo

    The Grunwald Monument...

    by coceng Updated Sep 28, 2003

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    Strong !...in Krakow

    It was built & unveiled with a splendid ceremony in 1910 to commemorate the anniversary of the Polish victory over the Teutonic Order at Grunwald (15th July 1410).

    This monument was a gift from the outstanding composer Ignacy Paderewski. It was destroyed by the Germans during the 2nd World War & was restored in 1976.

    It depicts the figure of King Wadislavs Jagiello, sitting on a horse. Below is the Lithuanian Prince Witold leaning on a sword. Next to him is the Grand Master of the Tteutonic Order.

    On the right side of the monument, a Polish Knight & his squire are collecting the flags of the Teutonic Knights. On the left side, there is a Lithuanian Knight & a Teutonic Knight kneels by him as a prisoner. Uner the monument there are urns containing soil from the places of the Polish battles.

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