St. Florian's Gate and the Barbican, Krakow

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  • The Barbican
    The Barbican
    by roamer61
  • The Gate
    The Gate
    by roamer61
  • The barbican.
    The barbican.
    by londontraveller01
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Florianska gate.

    by breughel Updated Jan 30, 2014

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    Florianska gate.
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    Coming from the central market Rynek Glowny by the very touristy Florianska street - with burger and kebab shops - the contrast is great with the medieval St-Florian Tower gate from 1307 and the medieval fortification walls on both sides of the tower.
    On the left in the Pijarska street is a small museum about the City Defensive Walls (Mury Obronne). Ticket is combined with the Barbican.

    We did not visit; after Carcassonne, Aigues-Mortes, Avila, and others we think we have done our duty climbing on medieval walls.

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    Barbakan.

    by breughel Updated Jan 30, 2014

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    Barbican.

    Frankly I was not impressed by this barbican. Too nice, too clean, too restored, looking weak because build of bricks. Not military enough for me. Give me rough granite stone that's what I like to see on medieval fortifications.
    This Gothic-style barbican, built around 1498, is one of the very few such fortified outposts still surviving in Europe, and the best preserved and largest.
    Furthermore it is a nice barbican. The term "fairy-tale" was used here in some comments and I do understand because I'm not far from feeling that way when I discovered the barbican through the leaves of the Planty garden trees.

    Another one is in Warsaw and was rebuilt after its destruction during WW II.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Municipal Arsenal

    by mvtouring Updated Jul 13, 2013

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    The surviving fragment of Krakow's city wall opposite the Barbakan, where students and amateur artists hang their paintings for sale in the summer, contains the Renaissance Municipal Arsenal, which now houses part of the National Museum's Czartoryski Collection. I bought the most beautifull little painting here, that always reminds me of the good times we had here.

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    St Florian's Gate-Brama Floriańska

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 12, 2013

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    This is the only part of the medieval walls around the city that has survived. Originally constructed as part of the city defenses against possible invasion of the Turks, it had 4 towers and an arsenal. This was the main gate to the Old town, separated from the Barbakan by a moat. Today it leads onto Florianska Street a place active with shops and places to eat.

    This was part of the royal road, the processional route that VIP's would take through the city, going from Florian's gate to the Rynek Glowny and then over to Wawel Castle.

    The Gate is named for St Florian, whose veneration is common in Central Europe. Among other things he is the patron saint of firefighters. He is commonly depicted as a roman soldier pouring water over a fire. He died in 303 AD after being tortured when he refused to offer sacrifice to the Roman deities.

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    City Defenses

    by roamer61 Written Jun 18, 2013

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    The Gate
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    The Florian Gate and adjoining Barbican are the remaining elements of the defenses that once protected Krakow in the Middle Ages. the gate was built in the 14th century as protection against the Turks. It contains an image of St. Florian, the patron saint of Linz, Austria.

    The nearby barbican, which served as a fortified outpost, was added later on, in 1498. It is the best surviving structure of its kind in Europe. A museum inside shows the history and allows visitors to walk the parapets. Admission is charged.

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  • Jetgirly's Profile Photo

    The Barbican

    by Jetgirly Written Dec 9, 2012
    Krakow's Barbican

    Imagine my disappointment upon discovering that Krakow's barbican was in absolutely no way connected to Barbizon- the modeling agency of my preteen dreams. Rather than being a place for permed girls to go in the back of Seventeen magazine, the barbican was a big, round outpost through which anyone wanting to enter Krakow would have to pass. Full of twists and turns, and easy shots for bow-and-arrow-armed soldiers in its seven turrets, the barbican helped keep Krakow safe from invading armies and other unsavoury characters.

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    St. Florian's Gate

    by Jetgirly Written Dec 9, 2012

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    St. Florian's Gate, Krakow
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    Florian's Gate was built in the 14th century as part of a series of fortifications hoping to protect the city from Turkish attacks. The gate marks the beginning of the Royal Road, a route past many of Krakow's most beautiful buildings that was traditionally used during coronations, parades and other important events in the city. Two hundred years ago one might have seen nearly fifty similar towers protecting the city, yet today only three still stand. On the outside of the gate there is a park, which is home to the barbican, while on the inside of the gate ul. Florianski is a street with many shops and restaurants (and yes, McDonalds).

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    Medieval Fortifications - the Barbican.

    by Askla Updated Dec 3, 2012

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    Krakow's main city gate had to be defended, at any cost. Therefore Europe's mightiest barbican was built in 1498 - 99 thanks to king Jan Olbracht. It's diameter is nearly 25 metres and the walls are up to 3,65 metres thick. There are 130 loopholes in four rows: the upper for archers and riflemen, the lower for the artillery. In the past the Barbican was surrounded by a 30 metres wide moat, which is now filled up and actually where we walk today.
    During summer the Barbican can be visited together with a tour of the Florian's Gate.

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    Medieval Fortifications - the Florian's Gate.

    by Askla Updated Dec 3, 2012

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    The medieval Krakow had a defence system consisting of around three km long walls. The main walls were 10 metres high and 2,5 metres thick with 39 towers and 8 gates. Alongside the main walls there were lower walls and an eight metres deep and 22 metres wide moat. The construction started in the late 13th century. Not much of this remains today, only the Florian's Gate, a short stretch of the wall together with three towers, and the Barbican.
    The Florian's Gate is ~33 metres high. It was built around 1300. This was the site where Krakow's Royal Road begun. Visiting Polish kings and queens, foreign monarchs and other guests of importance entered the city here and then went to the Main Square and further on to the Royal Castle, Wavel.
    Nowadays tourists can visit the Florian's Gate as well as the Barbican (see my next tip) on a tour every day during summer. First entrance is at 10.30 and closure at 18.00.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    St. Florian's Gate

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 14, 2012

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    St. Florian's Gate

    The 33 m tall St. Florian's Gate (Brama Florrianska) was part of the anicent defence walls. It was completed in 1307 and a Baroque roof was added in 1657. The gate was the entrance to the Old Town and the starting point for the Royal Route.

    Directions:
    The St. Florian's Gate is situated at the northern end of the shopping street ul. Florianska.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Florianska Gate and surroundings

    by Martin_S. Updated Jan 4, 2012
    Florianska Gate, old city Krakow, Poland
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    Krakow, like any sizeable and respectable old city, has its city walls and gates. The Florianska Gate, near the Barbican, and the streets approaching it are the best preserved in Krakow. We always enjoy taking our time to just "wander", with no purpose in mind, the streets of the old citys, just sort of absorbing the ancient feel of them. Here near the Florianska Gate we found a wonderful bridge connecting two buildings on opposite sides of the street. Also a statue of the god Mercury with his winged hat and shoes.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Florianska Gate

    by mvtouring Updated Jan 8, 2011

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    St Florian gate is the main city gate, built at the end of the XIII century. to protect the northern entrance to the city. On both sides of the gate are the Medieval city walls, and it is great how they are using the old town wall to display paintings from new upcoming young artists and that way also introduce them to the world.

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    Barbakan Krakowski (Barbican)

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 18, 2010

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    Barbakan Krakowski (Barbican) - Krak��w
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    The Kraków Barbican is a former fortified outpost and munition depot. It's the sole remainders of a sries of similar barbicans that were located around the old city.

    The building was constructed in 1498-1499. Originally the barbican was linked to the city wall by a covered passageway and a drawbridge at the St. Florian Gate.

    Nowadays the building is a multi purpose exhibition center.

    Admission fee: PLN 7.00 (adult)

    Summer visiting hours:
    Daily: 10.20AM - 6PM

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    Brama Floriañska

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    Brama Floria��ska - Krakow
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    The Brama Floriañska or St. Florian's Gate is the main city gate dating from the late 13th century.

    In 1657 a roof in Baroque style was constructed.

    At the town side there is a stone relief of St. Florian looking over the Floriañska street.

    In the 19th century the city walls lost their original function and most of them were demolished; luckely the Brama Floriañska was spared together with the 16th-century city arsenal known as the Barbican in front of the gate.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Barbican or Barbikan

    by suvanki Written Jul 18, 2010

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    Barbican
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    Passing through St Florians Gate (see previous tip) we found ourselves standing behind this 15th Century fortification, that was part of Krakow's defense system. This is the only one of the pair of Barbicans in Krakow that remains.

    This was our meet up point, so it wasn't until the following day, when we passed by this structure to reach Plac Matejki, that I got to see its full impact. (Main photo)

    From this Square, I could see why it is considered one of the most beautiful (and largest) of the few remaining similar structures in Europe.
    If I had seen this view initially, I would have thought it was a small arena (It did resemble an Andalucian bull ring, with its circular structure, Moorish/Arabic style gated archways and the overhanging windows above the gate)

    The seven turrets gave it a Disneyesque appearance. The 24.4 metre diameter circular brick walls are 3 metres deep, and have 130 loopholes. The lower ones were for artillery, while the upper holes were for archers and riflemen. The moat was 20 metres wide and 8 metres deep.

    Apparently, it was connected to St Florians Gate by a narrow passage and drawbridge that crossed the moat.

    This would probably have been the site of jousting, sword fights and executions.

    Today, the Barbican is used as an open air gallery, and also is host to small concerts and theatre productions.

    It was also the meet up point for the 6th VT Euromeet, where Matt and Urszula and their helpers were here to welcome us, then take our money for our guided walks of Medieval Krakow, so we'll continue to our next Thing to Do/See in Krakow........

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