Barbican, Warsaw

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  • The Barbican
    The Barbican
    by HORSCHECK
  • Barbican
    by fachd
  • Barbican
    by fachd
  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Semi circle fortified medieval outpost

    by fachd Written Oct 11, 2012

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    The Warsaw Barbican is a semi circle fortified medieval outpost connected to the city walls, which was used for defensive purposes. It was destroyed during WWII and Warsaw Uprising in 1944. It was rebuilt after the war using scattered bricks from historical buildings that was destroyed. They used the etching from 17th century diagram. It is a major tourist attraction and is located between the Old and New Town close to the Old Town Main Square.

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    The City Walls

    by fachd Written Oct 11, 2012

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    The City Walls form a city circle around the Old City. It was built during the 14th and 15th century and like all ancient walls it was built for defensive purposes. Much of it has been destroyed during WWII; today you can see fragments of the wall at the old city starting on one side of the Castle Square to the north of Market Square.

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Las murallas / The walls

    by elpariente Written Nov 26, 2011


    Barbican: a medieval defensive structure that served as support of the boundary wall, located on a door that was used for defensive purposes
    The Barbican is one of the few remaining fortifications in Warsaw. It was built in the sixteenth century and was restored after World War II using the bricks from the ruins of the Old City
    Separate the Old city of the New and in one side is the Vistula river
    Here usually there ara artists selling wood carvings, paintings ...

    Barbacana: es una estructura defensiva medieval que servía como soporte al muro de contorno , situada sobre una puerta o puente que fuera utilizada con propósitos defensivos
    La Barbacana es una de las pocas fortificaciones que quedan en Varsovia . Se construyó en el siglo XVI y se rehabilitó después de la segunda Guerra Mundial utilizando los ladrillos de las ruinas de la Ciudad Antigua
    Separa la Ciudad Vieja de la Nueva y a un lado tiene el Vístula
    Aquí siempre suele haber artistas que venden tallas de madera , cuadros ...

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    Barbican (and city walls)

    by Airpunk Written Nov 1, 2011
    The Barbican
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    The name Barbican is used for the whole defence structures north of the old town, not just only for the classic barbican. They were all built in the mid-16th century, using red bricks as main material. Those structures in the present form replaced older fortifications dating back to 1339. The city walls were partly demolished in the 18th and 19th century, although some parts were pretty well preserved until 1944 when German Nazi Forces blew them up together with most of the old town. The current Barbican is a post-war reconstruction and belongs to the UNESCO World Heritages Site which comprises the old town and the Royal Castle. It was finished in 1954, but earned criticism as some of the material used came from demolished historic buildings outside of Warsaw. The Barbican itself is the second largest in Poland (after Kraków) and only one of two dozens which have survived to this very day in Europe. Today, it is a popular spot for artists to sell their work – you will find them even in the midst of a typical Warsaw winter.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Barbican visit

    by Martin_S. Updated May 8, 2011

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    Along the wall to the Barbican, Warsaw
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    Beautiful walk through the old Warsaw center to arrive at the Barbican. Daria, Zohara and I approached it along the city walls which was part of the defense system. What I found on the internet simply said that it was built in the 16th century and is "classical" Gothic.

    We found several local artists selling their wares here at the Barbican.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Barbican

    by Raimix Updated Mar 29, 2011

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    City barbican together with defensive walls was built in 1548, projected by Italian Giovanni Batista. Actually most of walls and barbican were rebuilt after destruction of Second World War.

    Nowadays it is symbolic place that connects old and new tows. Nearby you could see souvenir sellers and musicians.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    The Barbican

    by HORSCHECK Updated Oct 10, 2010

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    The Barbican
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    The Barbican (Barbakan) was built in 1548 and is part of the 1200 m long city walls.

    It serves as a gate between the Old and New Town of Warsaw. Nowadays it is a popular place for street vendors and performers.

    Directions:
    The Barbican can be found at the northern end of the Old Town between the streets Nowomiejska and Freta.

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  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    walk on the walls

    by uglyscot Updated May 5, 2008

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    The Barbican
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    The Barbican dates from 1548, and was restored 1953-4. It is a bridge between the Old Town and the New Town. Built of red brick, the towers and walls [or if you prefer, turrets and ramparts ] are a striking feature, Within the nooks and crannies artists try to sell their paintings, carvings etc. The ramparts are not very long so a walk on them does not take much time.

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Barbican

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    Barbican

    This massive, red-brick city gate (together with some remnants of the historic city walls) was created in the 16th century by an Venetian architect, the Italians then being experts in fortification architecture. It marks the border between Warsaw Old Town and New Town.

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  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    The Barbican

    by alancollins Written Sep 5, 2006

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    The Barbican
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    The Old Town is surrounded by a wall and the northern gate into the New Town has a small fort called The Barbican. The original fortress was constructed in 1339 with a number of make- overs since. Unfortunately the fortress, as with the rest of the Old Town was destroyed during the second world war. The Barbican has been lovingly restored to its former glory.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    The Barbican

    by traveloturc Written Jul 31, 2006

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    the barbican
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    The Old Town is surrounded by city walls. The northern gate to the city five hundred years ago was transformed into a type of a fortress called barbican. At those times it was one of the most modern type of fortification. Nowadays it’s a spot for young painters to show their works.

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  • ZiOOlek's Profile Photo

    Barbican

    by ZiOOlek Written Jun 5, 2006

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    From its very foundation (around 1300) the Old Town was surrounded by an earthen rampart. In the XVI century the old walls made of mud and sand were replaced by defense walls made of bricks, on the stone foundations, with rectangular bastions and the Barbican (which is a gate, in front of the Nowomiejska Gate) designed by Giovanni Battista of Venice.

    From the second half of the XVIII the walls had been successfully pulled down. What we have today is a reconstruction done in 1946 - 1954, based on the state of the end of the XVI century. Relics of the old Gothic bridge can still be seen today. Within the walls the monuments were erected: to Jan Kiliński, the leader of the townsmen of Warsaw during the Kościuszko Insurrection in 1794 (the statue by St. Jackowski, made in 1935), and to the Young Insurgent in 1983 by Jerzy Jarnuszkiewicz.

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  • dejavu2gb's Profile Photo

    The Barbican

    by dejavu2gb Updated Apr 4, 2006

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    The Barbican
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    Built in 1548 and designed by Venetian Architect, Giovanni Battista.
    In 1936 the lower parts of the Barbican and fragments of the ramparts were unearthed and restored.
    The reconstruction was completed in 1954.

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  • matcrazy1's Profile Photo

    The best of all barbicans I've seen :-)

    by matcrazy1 Updated Feb 8, 2006

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    WARSAW BARBICAN AND MOAT
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    Barbican is a fortified outpost or gateway to a city or castle. Polish barbicans were situated outside the main line of defences and connected to the city walls with a walled road (sometimes covered) called the neck. They were built until the 15th or even 16th century when with the improvement in siege tactics and artillery, they lost their significance.

    I've already seen 8 of 23 barbicans which survived till now in 9 European countries (9 in UK, 5 in Poland). And I have to say that nothing compare to the two Polish barbicans: in Krakow and in Warsaw. Well, Poland and Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth being European (= world that time) superpower in 15/16th century built many fortifications to defend the country which naturally had to have many enemies.

    Warsaw barbican was built very late, in 1548. It was designed by Jan Baptysta Wenecjanin, an Renaissance achitect, to protect Nowomiejska gate. This wonderful round structure is enforced by 4 semi-round towers. After WWII damages the barbican was reconstructed in details but without the neck and gate (why?) which are marked with lower wall and different colour of pavement now. The way through the barbican connects the Old Town with the New Town. Barbican is the name of Warsaw taxi company, restaurant, pubs etc. now.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Barbican

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Feb 4, 2006

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    Warsaw-Barbican

    Hardly further the Market Square there is Barbikan - a part of a medieval wall around of Warsaw . On one of ledges of a wall in 1855 it was installed} Warsaw Water Nymph - a symbol of city.
    When I was in Warsaw in 1995, I saw Warsaw Water Nymph in Barbican.
    In 1999 she was in the yard of Royal Castle.
    Now I don't know where is she!
    The legend is connected with her, that once the mermaid the Siren came up from Vistula and forecasted to fisherman Varsu and his wife Sava, that they would construct a city there. And it has turned out Warsaw!

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