President's Palace, Warsaw

3 out of 5 stars 3 Stars - 21 Reviews

Krakowskie Przedmiescie 46/48

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  • A first view
    A first view
    by Odiseya
  • Presidential Palace - Warsaw
    Presidential Palace - Warsaw
    by Airpunk
  • Presidential Palace - Warsaw
    Presidential Palace - Warsaw
    by Airpunk
  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Monument to Prince Józef Poniatowski

    by Odiseya Updated Jul 16, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In honor to beloved leader

    In front of Presidential palace is monument of Prince Józef Poniatowski riding a horse.
    The author was Bertel Thorwaldsen, Danish sculptor.
    Working on monument last from 1830 till 1832th. Later tsar give it to general Ivan Paskevich, which moved it to his residence at Homel. Monument returned to Poland in the 1922 year. Monument was unveiled on the Saski square, but in the time of the last war it was completely destroyed. New mould, made by the model of the old one was a gift from the inhabitants of Kopenhaag.
    Who was Prinze Józef Poniatowski?
    He was a Polish leader, general, minister of war and army chief, who became a Marshal of the Empire and inspiration for Polish fight for freedom.

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  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    A special occasion

    by Odiseya Updated Jul 14, 2012

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    A first view

    The Presidential Palace (in Polish, Pałac Prezydencki; also known as Pałac Koniecpolskich, Lubomirskich, Radziwiłłów, and Pałac Namiestnikowski) is on the Royal way.
    Very elegant building with an equestrian statue of Prince Józef Poniatowski stands in the courtyard and two lion statues.
    I found out that is possible to explore the Palaces interior.
    Sightseeing of the Presidential Palace is free of charge. It takes place in organized groups with a guide after prior arrangement of a date. Interested persons should send an application to a fax number 22 695 11 09.
    Also you can take a virtual tour on http://prezydent.pl/wycieczka/

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Presidential Palace

    by Airpunk Written Oct 25, 2011
    Presidential Palace - Warsaw
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    Built in 1643, this place was a private residence for many years. Its nickname Radziwili or Radziwilos goes back to one of the noble families who owned it in this era. Things did not change until it was chosen as the place to stage the constitutional assembly of the Polish-Lithuanian Empire in 1791. Since then, the building was altered and expanded several times, maintaining its link to governmental institutions. It became the seat of the Polish Viceroy during the Russian Occupation (Congressional Poland) and later the seat of the first Polish President when Poland regained its independence in 1918. Miracolously, it survived the Second World War and the Warsaw Uprising better than most of the city and took over the function as seat of the Council of Ministers after the war. During that time, it became the place where the Warsaw Pact was signed. Later, also the Treaty of Warsaw (Part of Willy Brandt's Ostpolitik) was signed here and the negotiations between Solidarnosc and the Polish Government took place here in the early 1980s. It was not until 1994 when it became the seat of the Polish President again.
    The most notable monument is the statue of Prince Jozef Poniatowski. It was once removed from what is now Pilsudski Square and placed here. A disputed plaque commemorates the death of former president Lech Kaczynski in 2010. For some, this plaque is not enough, some others do not wish such a commemoration for Kaczynski at all. Note also the lions in front of the building. They show bullet holes from WWII and the fightings during the Warsaw Uprising. People say that they will roar when they see a really beautiful woman. Fortunately, my friend did not know that legend – so she didn't became upset when the lions kept quiet...

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Presidential palace

    by Raimix Updated Mar 29, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    As a palace it is known from middle of 17th century, later mainly rebuilt in classicism style at the beginning of 19th century. Nowadays it is working place of president of Poland. Some time ago it was used as residence of noble families, also as seat of government.

    Presidential palace is also called Radziwili (Radvilos) palace, as owners before was noblemen Radziwili from Lithuania.

    When I was standing near stone lions of the palace I already knew that here Warsaw pact was signed in 1955, putting half of Europe under “protection” of Soviet Union.

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    The home of the Polish president

    by Pavlik_NL Written Jan 22, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The

    Well, obviously this guy needs a lot of staff to keep this enormous place tidy. The presidential palace along the old "Trakt Karolewski" (Royal Road) is a beautiful building around a central square. At night (lucky me) it was wonderfully alluminated, so that also in the dark the building looked just great. Only wonder whether the president will be happy or sad when - after his presidential period - he has to move out again and start living in a - no doubt - somewhat smaller establishment (-:

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    President`s Palace

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jan 14, 2008

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    This palace on Krakowskie Przedmiescie street was built in the middle of the 17th century - later it belonged to the powerful nobles of the Radziwill family. Among the true historic events this palace witnessed was the founding of the Warsaw Pact 1955 and the negotiations in 1989 between Solidarity and the communist government leading to the peaceful transition of Poland into a democratic political system. (Among the minor events a visit by Michael Jackson comes to mind). Since 1994 the seat of the Polish President. The Palace square features a monument to the famous Polish military commander Poniatowski (who served in the campaigns of Napoleon Bonaparte).

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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    See The Polish White House & Silent Lions

    by scottishvisitor Written Aug 15, 2006

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    The Polish White House = President's Palace
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    Palac Prezydencki has been the residence of Poland's Presidents since 1994. The Palace seems to have different names according to my guide book one being the very long Palac Namiestnikowski or quite simply The Governor's Palace. This Palace has seen a lot of history, noteably the signing of the Warsaw Pact in 1955. There is a statue of Duke Jozef Poniatowski riding his horse in the front courtyard. The palace sits next to the swanky Bristol Hotel and is guarded by four lions, two at each entrance, legend has it that the Lions will roar if a truely chaste woman walks by - unfortunately they were silent all the time we were there!!

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  • gale.blog.pl's Profile Photo

    President's Palace

    by gale.blog.pl Updated Jul 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    President's House :)

    Like a number of other democratic nations, we have a president. And the president needs a house to live. Here's the house, lovely, isn't it.

    Till recently it used to be known as the Governor's Palace. It is here that the Warsaw Pact treaty was signed in 1955. Later, in 1989, the Palace was the venue of the Round Table talks which led to the dismantling of the communist system and deep socio-political changes in Poland.

    Standing in front courtyard, framed by the building's projecting wings and guarded by four lion figures is the statue of prince Jozef Poniatowski, commander in chief of the Dutchy of Warsaw armies and French marchall.

    There's still one thing that comes up to my mind: the house is huge and it needs a lot of cleaning. How much time, do you think, the president spends on cleaning his rooms?

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  • ZiOOlek's Profile Photo

    President's Palace

    by ZiOOlek Updated Jun 1, 2006

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    President's Palace
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    There are ten places called Warsaw in USA. Don't worry, I am not going to write about them...;)

    Warsaw has a population of about 1 million 700 thousand and become the biggest city in Poland. In 1596 Zygmunt III Waza, the King of Poland, moved the capital from Krakow to Warsaw.

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  • dejavu2gb's Profile Photo

    The Presidents Palace

    by dejavu2gb Updated Apr 4, 2006

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    The Presidential Palace
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    The Presidents Palace was built between 1643 and 1645 for the commander-in-chief of the Polish Army.
    Until 1817, it was the property of the Family of Radziwill, and was extended several times.
    Since 1994 this has been the residence of the President of Poland.

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  • matcrazy1's Profile Photo

    Polish White House and VT-gang

    by matcrazy1 Updated Jan 29, 2006

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    NAMIESTNIKOWSKI PALACE
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    VT-gang stayed in Le Meridien Bristol hotel at night January 20/21, 2006. I had a view through my window (open the last picture) to the southern wing of Presidential Palace usually called the Namiestnikowski Palace. Wow, maybe this fact justifies great care of hotel staff and security about amusing VT-ers desperately looking for own rooms of forgotten numbers in the middle of a night to sleep though, not to hit the president.

    The impressive, elegant, classical building of Namiestnikowski Palace has been a seat of the President of Poland since 1994. Well, we had first secretary of communist party before which resided in what is a stock exchange now, comrades Stalin and Brezhnev must turn in their graves :-). The palace is surely fenced and unfortunatelly closed for the public. It was built in 17th century but changed its design in 1818 - 1819.

    Many famous and unfamous events which influenced my and many others life took place in this building:
    - Poland's 3rd May Constitution, the first written national Constitution in Europe (and the world's second after the US) was signed in 1791 :-);
    - the Warsaw Pact was signed in 1955 :-(;
    - the Treaty of Warsaw between West Germany and the People's Republic of Poland was signed in 1970 :-);
    - the Polish Round Table Talks between Solidarity and the Communist regime took place in 1989.

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  • bryINpoland's Profile Photo

    Polish White House

    by bryINpoland Updated Mar 21, 2005

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    My friend Margaret and the Palace

    The Presidentail Palace is pretty cool. Unfortenatly it is not open for tours, but it makes for a great pic. The arm guards around the Palace are always fun to watch and they are always watching u, waiting for the American tourist to try somethign stupid. Thats atleast how i always felt. Maybe i look like trouble.

    Anyways i wont waste your time with all the facts of the palace. I will just tell you it was finished being built in 1645.

    Basicly just take a pic infront of it.

    *Please feel free to rate this tip, or any of my other tips. I am always looking to improve them. Thank you...

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  • tpal's Profile Photo

    Radziwill Palace - Home of the President of Poland

    by tpal Written Feb 9, 2005

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    Radziwill Palace

    The Radziwill Palace is Poland's presidential residence. Located on Krakowskie Przedmiescie, this is the section of the 4km long Royal Way is closest to Old Town. The Palace is said to be the location of Fryderyk Chopin's first concert in Warsaw. The statue in front is that of Prince Jozef Poniatowski the nephew of the last King of Poland.

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  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Namiestnikowski Palace

    by AcornMan Updated Sep 19, 2004

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    Continuing south from Carmelite Church, and still on the east side of the road, is the next stop on the Royal Way, Namiestnikowski Palace. This sprawling structure is essentially Poland's equivalent of the White House, though it is significantly larger and more impressive.

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  • Spinka's Profile Photo

    President's Palace

    by Spinka Written Jul 8, 2004
    President's Palace

    The building of the Palace was begun in 1643 by Crown Field Hetman (Commander-in-Chief) Stanislaw Koniecpolski.
    The Palace was designed by Konstantyn Tencalla, an official architect of King Wladyslaw IV, author of the King Zygmunt III Waza's statue.
    In the night of 2nd to 3rd May 1791 a delegation of deputies was formed who wanted to save the Republic and the 3rd of May Constitution.
    In 1818, the Palace became the seat of the Viceroy of the Polish Kingdom.
    In 1965, the statue of Duke Jozef Poniatowski was placed in front of the Palace.
    Since July 1994 it has been the official seat of the President of the Republic of Poland.

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