The Tomb of Unknown Soldier, Warsaw

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Plac Pilsudskiego

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    Square Pilsudski - panorama
    by Odiseya
  • The Tomb of Unknown Soldier
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  • The Tomb of Unknown Soldier
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    Nearly every country in the world has one

    by fachd Written Oct 11, 2012

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    Nearly every country in the world has Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. It is symbolic and it is a tomb of remembrance of Polish soldiers who fought and died for freedom. The tomb proudly stands between the beautiful peaceful Saxon Garden and Pilsudski Square. We were lucky enough to see the change of the guard. I must admit it wasn’t as good as the change of the guard I saw in Ankara Turkey but nevertheless it was memorable. I think the changing of the guard is held everyday at noon.

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    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    by Odiseya Updated Jul 14, 2012

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    In honor
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    Out of respect to the host and their culture, I try to learn about their culture of remembrance.
    The city had a turbulent past. One of his memories is a symbolic homage to millions soldiers who sacrificed their lives fighting for Poland’s freedom.
    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (Polish: Grób Nieznanego Żołnierza) is placed between square Pilsudski and the Saxon garden incorporate in both ambient.
    In wide range near the monument are: Evangelical Church, the Zachęta art gallery, and, in background, Palace of Culture and Science.
    The Tomb was designed by the famous Polish sculptor, Stanisław Kazimierz Ostrowski.
    In front of monument it held numerous celebration. In time of my visit it preparing for celebration of 60 anniversary of Uprising of Poles.

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    Tomb of the unknown soldier

    by Airpunk Written Nov 2, 2011

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    Pilsudski Square with Tomb of unknown soldier
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    Although symbolic for all soldiers killed in war actions, this famous “Tomb of the Unknown Soldier” is indeed the tomb of a soldier. During the defence of Lviv in the winter of 1918-1919, he was killed but never identified. His tomb is housed in an arcade of the former Saxon Palace which was blown up by German Nazi Forces in 1944. Today, it is the central place of WWII memorial ceremonies in Poland and known trough broadcast transmissions worldwide.
    Changing the Guards ceremonies take place regularly, unfortunately I just missed one when I arrived. Unfortunately, I am not well informed about the times. For sure, there is one changing of guards at noon, but I think that there are more changings as the one I missed was well before noon.

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE TOMB OF THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER

    by DennyP Updated Sep 26, 2011
    THE CHANGING OF THE GUARD
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    While out walking through the city, I decided that I would make the time to visit the Tomb of The Unknown Soldier with its eternal flame that commemorates all Polish soldiers that have fallen in battle. While always looking at points of Military History, and this city had many, I wanted to see this one as this particular day there was a changing of the guard ceremony taking place at noon.
    This solemn Guard Changing Ceremony was held in a really large open area known as Marshall Palsudski Square that is bordered by a lovely huge park known locally as Saxon Gardens and through it was a pleasant walk to the site. The soldiers taking part in the ceremony were few and exceptionally well appointed for their task..I found the drill and the short ceremony excellently performed and well worth the visit.. and if you get the chance while in Warsaw this is an event to witness..

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Unknown Soldier

    by Raimix Updated Mar 29, 2011

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    Tomb is a part of huge Saxon palace that not remained till these days. This part was the arched entrance to palace. The palace almost fully was destroyed in Second World War.

    Ashes of unknown soldiers (from First World War) were put here in 1925. Nowadays here soldiers stand, saving eternal fire. I haven’t seen that, but they change at noon.

    It is a plan to fully rebuild former Saxon palace, of course putting Tomb together as well, but it takes time and needs money.

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Grob Nieznanego - The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 12, 2007

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    Back in the 18th century there stood a Saxon Palace which served the king as a residence, with the lovely French-style Saxon Gardens (Ogrod Saski).

    The tomb is the only surviving fragment of the former palace and the gardens were turned into an English landscaped park in the 19th century!

    Changing of the guard takes place at noon on Sundays.

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    Independence Day

    by alancollins Updated Jan 28, 2007

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    Crowd leaving at the end of the parade
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    The 11th November is a Public Holiday in Poland to celebrate Independence Day. It is regarded as the date when Poland finally regained independence following the partitions that began in the 18th century. There is a parade in Warsaw on the square in front of the Tomb to the Unknown Soldier, which is attended by the President and other officals. The ceremony starts at 12 midday and the crowds are always huge.

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    Take A Few Moments of Reflection

    by scottishvisitor Updated Aug 12, 2006

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    Silent Guards
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    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier stands in a huge shiny paved square. It was said that fortune smiled during the dark years of WWll when parts of the then Saski Palace were retreaved from the rubble and later used to build the tomb. After reading the battle honours listing all the places Polish Soldiers had fought and gazing on the eternal flame, we sat in the sunshine marvelling at the young Polish Soldiers standing to perfect attention despite many cameras clicking into their faces. After a short while the soldiers stamped their metal capped boots and marched slowly in opposite directions around the outside of the tomb before returning to their very special duty. I don't think I will ever forget the sound of the metal capped boots on the tiles or the magnificent sight of the two soldiers.

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    Unknown soldier

    by traveloturc Written Jul 31, 2006

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    The Symbolic monument to nameless heroes fallen in fight for Poland's freedom. Located in an arcade fragment of the destroyed Saski Palace. On November 2nd, 1925, interred here were the ashes of an Unknown Soldier from Lyczakowski Cemetery, defender of Lvov, and the urns with earth from the World War I battlefields. The Palace destroyed in 1944. The rebuilt monument contains urns of earth from all the 20th century battlefields on which Poles had fought and died.

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    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    by ZiOOlek Written Jun 1, 2006

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    The Symbolic monument to nameless heroes fallen in fight for Poland\'s freedom. Located in an arcade fragment of the destroyed Saski Palace. On November 2nd, 1925, interred here were the ashes of an Unknown Soldier from Łyczakowski Cemetery, defender of Lvov, and the urns with earth from the World War I battlefields. The Palace destroyed in 1944. The rebuilt monument contains urns of earth from all the 20th century battlefields on which Poles had fought and died.

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  • matcrazy1's Profile Photo

    One more Warsaw landmark :-)

    by matcrazy1 Updated Feb 13, 2006

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    THE TOMB OF UNKNOWN SOLDIER
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    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is dedicated to the unknown soldiers who fell in their fight for Poland. The honour guard is held in front of the tomb all the time.

    Take a quick look here first, please. I do believe that the pre-war, impressive look of that place will be restored soon. There is an architectural project of restoring two palaces on both sides ot the monument. The city government plan says that one of them should serve the city and its visitors while the second one should be designated parlty for local business that, in reverse, whould help to finance the project.

    The Tomb and the two palaces were not restored after damages of WWII for political reasons. Commubist authorities wanted desperately to erase from Polish brains memory of the events which led to the monument creation that was Polish-Soviet War 1919-1921 and the Battle for Lviv in 1918 - 1919.

    In 1918 Ukrainian forces besieged Lviv, defended succesfully by Polish at first irregular forces. Finally the Inter-Allied Commission in Paris agreed to leave the city under Polish administration. Both Polish and Ukrainian victims of this conflict are buried at the Lychakivskiy Cemetery in Lviv. Ashes of one of the unknown soldiers killed in the fighting were transferred and buried in the Unknown Soldier Monument in Warsaw in 1925. 14 urns containing soil from 14 different battlegrounds of the WWI and Polish-Soviet War were added.

    Only parts of the central columnade with the Tomb survuved WWII (look here) and were restored. However the communist authorities erased all the traces of the Polish-Bolshevik War of 1919-1921. They added soil from 24 additional battlegrounds but only a small part of the battles of the Polish Army in the West was included. This was corrected in 1990 after Poland regained its political autonomy.

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    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier & Saxon Gardens

    by acemj Updated Nov 20, 2005

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    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier sits beneath the lone surviving portion of the Saxon Palace which was located here prior to World War II in Plac Pilsudskiego. The guard is changed every hour and they will happily pose for you if you're taking pictures. I don't think they are supposed to interact with people, but when two cute girls were taking their picture, they couldn't help but smile and flirt with the girls. I got no reaction out of them!

    Just behind the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is the Saxon Gardens, which are modelled after Versailles in France. The well-manicured gardens are highlighted by a long central pathway leading directly from behind the Tomb of the Unkown Soldier. This path is lined with sculptures and beautiful trees. There is also a lake and plenty of benches that are perfect for a nice afternoon of relaxation.

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    Memorial

    by travelnurse21 Written Oct 15, 2005

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    This is located in the Saxon Gardens. The guard is changed every hour, and groups of soldiers march back and forth between the tomb and the Ranziwill Palace. Changing of the guard takes place every Sunday at noon.

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    To remember and pay respect

    by adin Updated Sep 9, 2005

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    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is dedicated to all Polish soldiers who died in battle and their place of burial is unknown. It is situated under what has remained of the great palace and walls that used to stand here before WW2, originally built by king Augustus II of Saxony.
    Every day at 12:00 (midday) you can see the change of the guards, a tradition kept and cherished.
    On August 15 every year, the day of the Polish armed forces, the central ceremony is conducted here.

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    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    by mightywease Written Apr 24, 2005

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    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    The Tomb of the Unknown Solider stands in Pilsudaki Square under arches that are all that is left of the Saxon Palace colonnade, the rest of which was destroyed during World War II. Thankfully the tomb escaped this destruction and it still stands as a monument to Polish soldiers who fought for their country. The tomb and eternal flame is guarded 24 hours a day by two soldiers. Like similar monuments in other countries the tomb is a good place to think, reflect, give thanks and perhaps contemplate our own responsibilities to the world we live in and to the people, community, of that world.

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