Gdansk Shopping

  • Hala Targowa
    Hala Targowa
    by briantravelman
  • Inside Hala Targowa
    Inside Hala Targowa
    by briantravelman
  • Fruit And Vegetable Market
    Fruit And Vegetable Market
    by briantravelman

Most Recent Shopping in Gdansk

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    Cepelia: Kashubian Crafts

    by briantravelman Written Jan 23, 2014

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    Kashubian Crafts
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    Cepelia is a chain store in Poland that sells traditional Kashubian crafts. Most of the items were out of my price range, but I did buy two Kashubian dolls for 87 zloty, about 28 USD. It was a bit much, but I guess it's a fair price since they are hand crafted.
    If you want to shop here, do so as early as possible, because they raise the prices during the tourist season, specifically during St. Dominic's Fair.

    The Kashubians are most famous for their beautiful lace, and table cloths, but they were a little out of our price range, and they usually aren't willing to haggle with you.

    What to buy: Kashubian dolls, carvings, lace, and table cloths

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    Hala Targowa: Market Hall

    by briantravelman Written Jan 23, 2014

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    Hala Targowa
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    Hala Targowa or "Market Hall", is the one of the most popular shopping centers in Gdansk, and the most popular among tourists. I thought it was gonna be a traditional market, selling traditional Polish items, but It's basically a modern day shopping mall. They mostly sell clothes and electronics, but there are also some food markets on the bottom floor, which sell meat, fish, and Polish sweets. There is also a nice open air fruit and vegetable market located next to the building.
    You may be able to haggle with some of the vendors, for a cheaper price, however, once you purchase an item, you cannot return it, and get your money back. You can only exchange the item.
    There personally wasn't anything here for me, but someone else may find something they like. I did enjoy the outdoor fruit and vegetable market though, and even bought a watermelon, though the market was a bit expensive.
    Honestly, the shopping center has become more of a tourist attraction, so it's worth popping in to at least check it out. There are also a few small archaeology exhibits, if you don't actually want to buy anything.
    There isn't a lot of diversity in the product, if you want more diversity, check out the Madison Shopping Center.

    What to buy: Food, clothing, and electronics

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    Zielony Rynek: Przymorze Flea Market

    by briantravelman Updated Sep 14, 2013

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    Zielony Rynek in Przymorze is one of the best and most popular shopping areas in Gdansk. It's basically a large outdoor flea market. All the merchants have their stalls set up outside. You can find almost anything here from fruit and vegetables, to fresh fish, fresh roasted chicken (only on the weekend), sandals, shoes, belts, hats, clothes, sunglasses, toys, books, CDs, and much more. But beware of rude salesmen, and pickpockets. I can't tell you if the salesmen speak English or not, but if you hang out around their stalls, and don't buy anything, or take too long deciding on a purchase, you will get yelled at. And ask if you can sample the fruit before doing so, because you will get yelled at for that as well.
    Other then a few rude salesmen, I really enjoyed this market. This was the first time I had seen an open air flea market like this. I thought it would be an indoor one, and I was really surprised and excited. I would definitely visit this market at least once for your shopping. They only sell everyday items though, so you won't find any amber or souvenirs here, but the exchange rate means these items are a lot cheaper then in most other countries.
    The market doesn't open 'til around 10 or 11, and closes some time around 2 or 3. If you're visiting on a weekend, remember that buses only run every hour, so take your time, and walk around.

    I would post a picture of this market, but I don't have any. I don't think the vendors and shoppers would've taken too kindly to having their picture taken, unless you snapped a quick one from a distance, especially since most of the shoppers are from lower class families. Don't let that deter you though, this market is for everyone. I'd recommend leaving any cameras behind though, to avoid trouble. This isn't exactly a tourist market, so the locals might not like it, and it might get stolen or smashed.

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    St. Catherine's church shop: Postcards, books, gifts

    by matcrazy1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    VESTIBULE OF ST. CATHERINE'S CHURCH
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    There is small shop at vestibule to St. Catherine's church. They offer good variety of Gdansk postcards, some small gifts, books on Gdansk and the church (mostly in Polish language) and church music on CDs.

    What to buy: Postcards, eventually you can look at them to see what to visit in Gdansk.

    What to pay: 1.00 - 3.50 zl (€1 = 4 zl) per postcard (average price). About 15 - 30 zl per CD.

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    Uphagen's House: Postcards and tourist literature

    by matcrazy1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    IN FRONT OF THE UPHAGEN'S HOUSE
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    There is the ticket office to the Historical Museum of Gdansk in front of the Uphagen's house. A woman dressed in old style sells postcards, leaflets on the exposition and books on Gdansk (in Polish, German and English). Add some small gifts available there.

    What to buy: Postcards - quite good collection. Look at them to see what to visit next in Gdansk.

    What to pay: 0.4 - 2.0 zl per postcard or collection of 10 postcards for 4.50 zl (€1 = 4.30 zl).

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    Street stalls, Mariacka Street: Gdansk fridge magnets

    by matcrazy1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    FRIDGE MAGNETS
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    There is a street stall in Mariacka street where colorful, artistic fridge magnets are sold. They show artistic impressions about various cities and towns around Gdansk and about Gdansk istself as well. They look like kiddy pictures.

    What to buy: If I was a foreign visitor, I would probably choose a magnet with the coat of arms of Poland, the white eagle with an yellow crown.

    What to pay: If I remember well, 5 zl per magnet (€1 = 4 zl).

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    The Post office: Write Home!

    by ranger49 Updated Nov 23, 2007

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    We had a number of letters and post cards awaiting stamps and found the Post Office on the left at the top of the main street in the old town.

    What an impressive building. Grand double doors at the entrance, lots of carved woodwork and glass inside the huge open space with "windows" all around. Not at all like our own local 1960's monstrosity.
    There seemed to be a system so we sat down on one of the beautiful carved oak benches while we tried to figure it out. A young man, overhearing our conversation, left his place in his queue and came to explain. You have to take a Ticket from the Machine just inside the door but you must take a ticket for the Window you want
    1) is for Paying bills- windows2-6.
    2) is for parcels at window 12
    3) letters & stamps - windows 13 - 20

    He kindly went and took a ticket for us, only to return a few minutes later with another ticket when he realised he had directed us to the wrong queue. Meanwhile he had lost his own place in the queue. His kind help was typical of the few encounters we had with people on this too short a visit.

    It was only later we learned that the Post Office played a part in the first revolt in 1939 against the Nazi invasion and occupies an important place in Polish history.

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    a hairdresser needed ? :-)

    by Landad Updated Jul 25, 2007

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    Don't go to the first one in the street :-) Take my advice and go to the one of better hairdressers in the 3-cities. This one is a specialist and have best students in the profession. What more... they speak English so you will not feel lost :-).

    What to buy: You can do with your hair whatever you wish. They are proffesionalist and use good products. They also will help you to choose something good for yourself :-)

    Remember to call before you come! The best hours are aroung noon. They work from 10 to 19:00, but in the afternoon there are a lot of people :-D.

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    If you found the tip useful, please RATE it.
    It took time to collect the data and publish it here for you to use it :-).
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    What to pay: For a cut 60 PLN. You can pay by credit/bank card.

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    Zapiecek: Boleslawiec pottery

    by zaffaran Written Jul 14, 2007

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    Many tourist visiting Poland buy pottery stuff made in Boleslawiec. You can also do it in Gdansk in which there's a shop selling this kind of pottery.

    What to pay: It depends on the size of the item and everybody can find something for them.

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    Pamiatki: Tourist info, amber, silver, gifts

    by matcrazy1 Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    PAMIATKI GIFT STORE
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    This tiny gift store offers tourist information and sells various gifts like pictures of old Gdansk, paintings and drawings of the Old Town of Gdansk and the Oliva cathedral as well as silver and amber jewelry.

    What to buy: Maps and travel guides to Gdansk in Polish, English and German. Maybe some small pictures or drawings if you like such staff.

    What to pay: Generally inexpensive although touristy place.

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    Pomorski Ogrod Sztuki Ludowej: Folk statues and Kashubian needlework

    by matcrazy1 Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    WOODEN FOLK STATUES
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    There is the Pomeranian Garden of Folk Art (Pomorski Ogrod Sztuki Ludowej) in the grounds of the Oliwa Park. There are a few tables put on a lawn where local artists try to sell their treausures: folk statues, Kashubian laces and colorful linen needlecraft, mainly tavleclothes.

    What to buy: I liked some wooden high and thin folk statues.

    What to pay: Try to bargain in Polish or... body language. Expect to pay some 50 - 200 zl (depends on size) per wooden statue or 30 - 100 zl per tablecloth. €1 = 4 zl.

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    Street stalls,the Oliwa Park: The tax whole in the European Union? :-)

    by matcrazy1 Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    GDANSK CRANE - DRAWING BY ANONYMOUS ARTIST
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    There are a few street stalls with pictures and drawings of old Gdansk set up on lawns along asphalted pathways of the Oliwa park. Each is run by a local artist or a person who pretends to be an artist. Well, sometimes it's difficult to differ them.

    Anyway, they themselves usually look interesting and/or strange (well, artists ? :-) but they never allowed me to take them pictures. Their faces were copyrighted but their "art" was not. Maybe they have created "the free economic zone" (read: they enjoy freedom and don't pay any taxes) in the park which, however, belongs to so called European Union which doesn't tolerate such zones and prefers " perfect order" and "big business", right?

    What to buy: Pictures and drawings of Gdansk.

    What to pay: No fixed prices. Try to bargain to make a good deal. Expect to pay 30 zl - 100 zl - 150 zl (1? = 4 zl) per picture (depends on size, technique, humour of the artist and the God knows on what else). Keep smiling and good luck :-)

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    The Roads to Solidarity gift shop: Everything about the Solidarity movement

    by matcrazy1 Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    GIFT STORE OF THE ROADS TO FREEDOM EXHIBIYIONS
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    There is a gift shop at the entrance to the Roads to Freedom exhibition in the BHP Hall of the Gdansk shipyard. It's a best place to buy various gifts and books related to history of the Solidarity movement including small items with Solidarity logo like pens, lighters, mugs, baseball hats and T-shirts. There are a few CDs whith songs which were played and sang on secret Solidarity meetings when the union was illegal.

    What to buy: Most books are in Polish language but a few are in German or English. I'd choose "The Road To Independence. Solidarność 1980-2005." for 150 zl which, except the historical background, includes a lot of photopgraphies and biographies of Solidarity activists.
    I liked a toilet paper with caricatures of leaders of communist parties in 1980' which was secretly produced in the underground during the martial law against Solidarity and coupons for basic food (meat, butter, sugar) or even vodka, cigarettes, soap and shoes.

    What to pay: Books are suprisingly a bit less expensive than in internet bookstores as I checked and cost 20 - 150 zl. CDs cost 15 - 50 zl, a mug and a T-shirt 25 zl, a baseball hat 9 zl, small items 3 - 5 zl. €1 = 4 zl.

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    Street stalls by a parking lot: Travel books about Westerplatte

    by matcrazy1 Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    TRAVEL GUIDES TO WESTERPLATTE
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    I arrived in Westerplatte as a first visitor and didn't see any street stalls in and around a bit neglected parking lot. But on the way back to my car I noticed the street stalls with postcards of Gdansk + some funny postcards as well. I always look at the postcards to check what to visit next. Sometimes it helps me to find the most beautiful places off the beaten path, not included in my travel books. They sold some gifts, I didn't like, and a travel guide to Westerplatte, too.

    What to buy: Postcards and/or a travel guide to Westerplatte (available in English, German and Polish).

    What to pay: Cheap. The little travel guide costs 8 zl (€ 2).

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    Pamiatki: Gift shop in Westerplatte

    by matcrazy1 Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    GIFT STORE IN WESTERPLATTE
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    "Pamiatki" means souvenirs or gifts in Polish language. There is the store of that name at the entrance to Westerplatte when you should buy tickets to visit a small museum nearby. Well, the shop does not look fancy in any way. It reminds me those old shops we had in Poland till 1990. First of all there is no self-service and they sell numerous, quite different goods mixed together: from ice-creams, cakes, coffee and soft drinks to basic cosmetics, gifts, travel guides and postcards. And the shop assistant can speak Polish only but very well :-). One more thing: no cards accepted there.

    What to buy: Well, I would suggest to buy tickets to a small museum (Guard-house No.1) put nearby. Then look at the postcards and small but quite detailed travel guides on Westerplatte (in Polish, German and English). What else? What you need. Maybe films or common batteries for your camera. I didn't like any gifts sold there.

    What to pay: Inexpensive shop, no worries. Tickets to the museum cost 2 zl (€1 = 4 zl).

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