Poznan Off The Beaten Path

  • Gniezno Cathedral
    Gniezno Cathedral
    by HORSCHECK
  • Gniezno Cathedral
    Gniezno Cathedral
    by HORSCHECK
  • Gniezno Cathedral
    Gniezno Cathedral
    by HORSCHECK

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Poznan

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    Church of St. Adalbert.

    by Askla Updated Jul 12, 2014

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    The present-day Gothic edifice was built in the first half of the 15th century, but the history of the Church of St. Adalbert (Kosciol Swietego Wojciecha) goes back to the time before Poznan got its town rights.
    The church's interior is covered with Secessional polychromy from 1911 - 13 (pic #2-4). The high altar contains a late Gothic relief depicting the Assumption of Mary (pic #5).
    At Christmas the church displays a quite famous moving crib.
    In the crypt rests, among a couple of others, Józef Wybicki who was the creator of the Polish national anthem.
    In front of the church stands a wooden belfry from the beginning of the 17th century.
    The church is not open to public but when I went there, there were a lot of people standing around cars and a bus perhaps 100 meters away from the church, in the middle in between the two churches which stand opposite each other. It showed that they were waiting for a bridal couple! Therefore the door was open into the church but I couldn't get any further than to a glass door to look through.
    The church is situated north of the city centre, about 500 meters from the Old Town Square, on the other side of Ul. Wolnica/Male Garbary, which is a busy street to cross. After that take either Ul. Dzialowa or Sw. Wojciecha and this is the church to the right.

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    Corpus Christi Church.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    The Corpus Christi Church once belonged to a monastery which was founded in 1399. The construction of the church was finished in 1470 but renovations were performed in the Baroque period. The Gothic elevations and Baroque gable and tower are preserved in the original state.
    The church was once an important pilgrimage destination.
    Unfortunately it is open only during mass, other times you can just look through a glass door. You find the church at ul. Strzelecka 40, south from the Old Town.
    The link I've posted will let you look at some really beautiful pictures if you click on "Galeria" but also on "Wnetrza". They are much better than mine!! The text is in Polish though.

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    Bernardine Church of the Franciscans.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    This church seems to have many different names: it is also known as The Franciscan Father's Church as well as St. Francis of Assissi Church. However on the maps is says Kosciól Bernardynów sw. Franciszka Serafickiego and you'll find it in the Bernardynski Square close to Ul. Garbary, a main street.
    It was originally built in 1473 in the Gothic style but was later altered into Baroque. The church was heavily damaged in the World War II - nearly all the furnishings were destroyed. All that survived was the twelve white statues depicting apostles (now on pillars along the nave), and the Passion scene on the rood-screen arch. Everything else has been brought to the church after the war.
    The adjacent monastery was founded in 1455, but of course also damaged in the war. It now hosts a small museum and in the garden is the bell you find on my last picture.

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    St. Martin's Church.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    The St. Martin (Marcin) Church is first mentioned in the 13th century. It dates from 1244 or 1252, nobody knows exactly. It has been damaged and rebuilt many times and was in fact the most seriously damaged church in town during the World War II. Rebuilt in the 1940s and 50s.
    The interior hosts a late Gothic triptych of St. Catherine from 1498 (see pics #2 and 3). It is also said there should be a wooden Gothic sculpture of the madonna, from 1510, in the nave somewhere but I could not find it, alas. That was a great disappointment I have to say.
    The murals were painted in 1957.
    Outside the church is a grotto built in 1911 after the vicar Wierbinski was miraculously cured of blindness by the healing water from Lourdes.
    You find the church in Ul. Sw. Marcin 13. Perhaps it's not exactly "off the beaten path" but it seems the church is not much visited.

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    St. Joseph's Church.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    Opposite St. Adalbert's Church you will find St. Joseph's, a Carmelite church built 1635 - 75, also known as the Church and Monastery of Discalced Carmelites.
    The most notable about the church is that it houses the grave of Mikolaj Skrzetuski who led the defence of the town against the Tartars and Cossacks in 1649.

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    St John's Church

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    This church is also called the Church of St John of Jerusalem Beyond the Walls.
    "Beyond the walls" is a reference to the location of the church in relation to the medieval stronghold. It is Poznan's second oldest church (after the cathedral) and one of the oldest examples of brickwork in Poland, dating from the 12th century.

    A pouring rain and a digital camera is no good combination, especially if the umbrella shows not to be waterproof (!!) and the church not be opened, so I have no pictures of the church, alas.

    The easiest way to get there is to take the tram, line 8 from the city center, and getting off at Rondo Srodka roundabout. The church sits on the right side just in front of you.

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    St Margaret's Church.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    The Srodka district was the main trade centre of Poznan in the 13th century but lost its importance when the town moved a little westwards. St Margaret's Church is one of few remaining buildings from the prospering days. The church is from the 14th century but much altered. It is historically interesting, but not open to public.

    To get there, take tram line 8 from city centre and get off at the roundabout, Rondo Srodka, after crossing the bridges 2 over the river. Cross the road and you will find the church about 100 meters further on among the houses.

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    Another oriel.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    A nice oriel in the Masztalarska ulica.

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    Fragments of the city wall.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    There is not much left of the old city wall, but at the bend of Masztalarska ulica (north of the Old Town Square) there is a short piece of the wall still standing. Or more acurate, what is there is the remainings of a tower, 6 meters high and 8.5 meters in diameter.

    The earliest mentioning of defensive walls in Poznan is in a document from 1297. It is believed that the city was fortified by Przemysl II, probably in 1275. The length of the walls was 2300 steps (1 step = 75 cm). The wall was supplemented by circa 35 towers, all named according to what craft guild was maintaining the tower or after special users.

    The big part of the walls were dismantled during the 18th and 19th centuries because they limited the growth of the city.

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    Palace of the Gorka Family.

    by Askla Updated Dec 14, 2012

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    In Wodna ulica 27, one can admire the wonderful portal from 1548. Inside there is a yard with arcades. When the palace was newly built it even had a little pond on top of the roof!
    It is situated in the square made up of Ul. Wodna, Swietoslawska, Kozia and Klasztorna. The north-western corner of the house "touches" the Old Town Square.

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  • ZiOOlek's Profile Photo

    Ice sculptures

    by ZiOOlek Written Mar 23, 2011

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    I was in Poznan during winter times and there was an international competition of ice's sculptures. It was quite interesting as the sculptures were quite unique. The exibition took place at the main market square.

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    Historical: First Concentration Camp in Poland

    by ut_eagle Updated Jul 2, 2010

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    Despite the beauty and modern beat of Poznan, there once was an ugly occupation on these very streets. If you want to see some of the history from WWII, visit Fort VII. Did you know that it was right here in Poznan, at Fort VII, where the first gas chambers were constructed, leading the way for the large gas chambers to be built at Auschwitz-Birkenau? Fort VII was the first concentration camp in the territory of Poland.

    I know the guy who runs this fort so I've had many tours. I can't say it's a wonderful experience, but definitely something I recommend everyone to visit. No amount of literature can equal the power of walking these hallowed grounds and standing on the same grass. Today there are wild flowers surrounding a memorial cross and birds chirp in the trees- a vivid reminder that evil exists for a time, but cannot sustain forever. The scars, however, last a lifetime and affect a whole culture.

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    Relaxing Oasis in the midst of the city

    by ut_eagle Updated Jul 2, 2010

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    If you want to sit and relax in a peaceful park, check out Park Wilsona and feed the ducks or take pictures by the waterfall or tap into your inner child and play in the sandbox, or check out the botanical gardens. You might even get lucky and stumble upon a free concert in the ampitheatre! Whatever your age, you will find something you enjoy in this huge park.

    From the main train station, walk towards McDonald's (there are signs from the train station pointing you in that direction!). Keep going past McD's, pass the first traffic light and keep walking straight. Just past the first set of buildings, the park entrance will be on your right. It's about 10-15 minutes walk from the train station.

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    Sroda Wielkopolska town

    by sihi Updated Jul 21, 2009

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    Sroda Wielkopolska old town. Poland
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    Sroda Wlkp. is a town not far , about 30 km from Poznan that is worth a visit. Town has about 20000 inhabitans. It has small old town witha a nice square and old collegiate church.
    One of attractions of the town is old steam railway that runs to town of Zaniemysl.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Trip to Gniezno

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    Gniezno Cathedral
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    On Easter Sunday we took a half day trip by train to Gniezno, which lies about 50 km east of Poznan.

    Geniezno was the first capital of Poland and is nowadays home to about 70.000 inhabitants.

    The city is dominated by its Gothic Cathedral (Archikatedra Gnieznienska), where Poland's first five kings were crowned.

    Apart from the cathedral, Gniezno has a picturesque market square and several other churches.

    Directions:
    There are frequent train services between Poznan and Gniezno. Depending on the type of train a 2nd class single ticket costs between 10 and 14 Zloty.Tickets can be bought directly at both Poznan's and Gniezno's train station. The journey takes between 40 and 60 minutes.

    Website: http://www.gniezno.home.pl/

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Poznan Off The Beaten Path

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