Sagres Off The Beaten Path

  • Portugal - Sagres
    Portugal - Sagres
    by solopes
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Willettsworld
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Willettsworld

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Sagres

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    Nossa Senhora da Graça

    by solopes Updated Dec 18, 2013

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    Sagres - Portugal
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    This modest church located inside the fortress was built in the 16Th century, replacing the original built by Henry the navigator one century before. Inside, only a Baroque retable deserves reference.

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    S Vicente

    by solopes Updated Dec 18, 2013

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    Sagres - Portugal
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    There are good views of S. Vicente cape from Sagres. Or, if you prefer, there are good views of Sagres from S. Vicente cape.

    The high cliffs protect a few secluded beaches (colder than the south coast, rough sea) and compose a beautiful landscape.

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    Fishing

    by solopes Updated May 11, 2012

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    Portugal - Sagres
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    It must be an excellent location to a big catch.

    That's the only way to explain the hard work of those men, that, from the top of the cliffs inside the fort of Sagres, show their skills, fishing and sliding a basket down the line to catch the fish, almost invisible at that distance.

    That's the reason why each fisherman has always a group of curious and interested observers.

    A few months ago, one of them felt down - take care!

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    Fortaleza da Baleeira

    by Willettsworld Updated Dec 16, 2010
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    Located on a headland that overlooks the fishing harbour in Sagres town, this ruined fort dates back to at least the 16th century as it existed in 1573 when Dom Duarte, Governor of the Algarve, visited. Its name means Fortress Whale in English and there's very little to see of it so don't waste your time if your time is limited.

    Directions: Drive right through town towards the harbour. When you get to a roundabout, where one road heads downhill to the harbour, walk up the left track and it's about 300 metres further on.

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    Monument

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 5, 2004

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    this monument was dedicated to Prince Henry the Navigator (Dom Afonso Henrique) the one that created the School of Navigation here in Algarve. I do not remember more about it, I think I should go back to the leaflets I brought with me LOL

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    Modern statues

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 5, 2004

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    Seems that in the last decades the fortress had many changes, lately the new buildings show expositions and also there are some modern sculptures at the ground of the fortress. Some of them were really interesting (specially a photography exposition on one of them)

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    Nossa Senhora da Graça Church

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 5, 2004

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    this little gothic church inside the fortress is dedicated to the virgin of Guadalupe. I though that maybe as it was an area dedicated to the sailors, the Virgin may had been virgin of Carmen (virgin and protector of the sailors), but not…

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    Cape St. Vincent seen from the Atlantic Ocean

    by dlytle Updated Nov 24, 2003
    Cape St. Vincent from the Atlantic Ocean

    When my cruise ship, Windstar’s Windspirit, left Portimao bound for Lisbon, we rounded the coast near Sagres and then Cape St. Vincent. It was a very sunny day, with only a slight breeze and a clear blue sky. The ocean was very calm and it was late in the day so the sun, streaming in from the west, was highlighting the details of the magnificent headlands as well as the St. Vincent lighthouse structure itself.

    All of this conspired to give us a riveting view of Cape St. Vincent from the Atlantic Ocean where so many historical figures had been and ancient battles fought. This was almost the identical view that Christopher Columbus or Horatio Nelson (minus the modern lighthouse of course) would have seen.

    In the picture, the headland of Sagres Promontory can be seen in the background upon which stands the Forteleza of Henry the Navigator. The small islands in front of the lighthouse anchor the most southwesterly point in Europe. So this view is looking east and south.

    If you have a chance to take a ferry or you are on a cruise ship sailing around Portugal, don't miss the opportunity to view this historical site from the sea.

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    Admirals Jervis and Nelson at Cape St. Vincent

    by dlytle Written Nov 24, 2003
    1797 Battle of Cape St. Vincent

    The Battle of Cape St Vincent took place on February 14, 1797 between a Spanish fleet under the command of Don José de Cordoba and a British fleet under Sir John Jervis. The Spanish fleet consisted of 27 ships-of-the-line in a state of neglect, drifting in disarray about 25 miles south-west of the cape, when Sir John arrived on the scene from Lisbon with 15 ships-of-the-line.

    He attacked the Spaniards without hesitation having ordered his ships into a single line ahead formation. To thwart their escape, a small 74-gun ship, the Captain, took on the world's largest warship, the 136-gun Santissima Trinidad and two other behemoths, with a total of 330 guns. He broke their line, led boarding parties, and captured all three. He then went on to harry Napoleon's fleet throughout the Mediterranean, and defeated it decisively at Trafalgar eight years later, thus changing the course of history. The young commander of the Captain who had shown such excellent judgment, courage and initiative was promoted to the rank of rear admiral within days of this important victory. His name was Horatio Nelson.

    Nelson was very familiar with the imposing sight of Cape St Vincent and Sagres Point having passed this way many times, the last being in September 1805 on his way to Cadiz and then on to Trafalgar.

    In 1833, Sir Charles Napier on behalf of Queen Maria II of Portugal engaged a naval squadron supporting her usurper uncle, Miguel. The Miguelite squadron was captured and that effectively sewed up Portugal's War of the Two Brothers. Perhaps Napier had taken inspiration from a previous engagement in 1797, the most famous of them all, which is named after the cape.

    The scene has not changed much since then. Today this is a wild and windswept place, where only a powerful but solitary lighthouse bears witness to modern ways.

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    Columbus, Drake and Torville at Cape St. Vincent

    by dlytle Written Nov 24, 2003
    Christopher Columbus escaped a sea battle here

    Here many major sea battles have been fought over the ages just in front of its fortress. The casual tourist would never suspect that desolate, forbidding Cape St Vincent was the site of many significant events in maritime history.

    Christopher Columbus was 24 years old and was with an armed convoy on its way from Genoa to England in May 1476 when pirates off Cape St Vincent attacked it. His ship went down in the ensuing fight and, though wounded, he managed to escape by swimming six miles to shore.

    Sir Francis Drake was very active in these waters harrying Spanish galleons returning from the Caribbean laden with treasure. Portugal was under Spanish rule at the time. With preparations well advanced for the "invincible armada" to invade England in 1587, Drake was sent by Elizabeth I to "singe the King of Spain's beard" in Cadiz harbor 150 miles east of Sagres. After destroying Spanish ships as they lay at anchor in Cadiz he went on to raze Vila do Infante (Town of the Prince) near Sagres.

    Admiral Tourville with a French fleet of 71 warships defeated a British fleet commanded by Sir George Rooke off Cape St Vincent in 1693. The English admiral Sir George Rodney defeated the Spanish Admiral Don Juan de Langara here while on his way to relieve Gibraltar in 1790.

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    Stunning splendor of the rugged coastline

    by dlytle Updated Nov 24, 2003
    Incredibly beautiful coastline near Sagres

    Around Cape St. Vincent there is the splendor of breathtaking rugged cliffs bordering the stunning coastline and a number of picturesque and usually empty sandy beaches broken up by craggy cliffs and fabulous grottoes. And then there are the estuaries and marshes where you will probably see some splendid wildlife. This area really is gorgeous.

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    Check out the chimneys in Sagres and Lagos

    by dlytle Written Nov 20, 2003

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    Decorative chimneys in Sagres

    In olden days, in the south of Portugal and especially in the area of Sagres and Lagos, the decorative chimneys on the homes were used as a gauge to show comparative wealth of the families living inside the home.

    The more ornate the chimney was then obviously the more wealth the family had.

    Nowadays, the chimneys on the modern structures are all inexpensive and prefabricated –although still decorative - so they have lost that old time, unique identifying quality. But you will still notice that the folks here like to decorate their chimneys in the old fashion.

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    How to handle end of the world- Eat bratwurst!

    by einokj Written Sep 7, 2003

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    Bratwurst at the end of the world

    I don't know if this is tourist trap of the worst kind or something really off-the-beaten-bath. The last bratwurst before America? Anyone knowing where is the first bratwurst in America? Please, tell me :-) This one is located in Sao Vicente.

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    Rosa-dos-Ventos

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 5, 2004

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    Still they do not know for sure what was the use of the Rose of the Winds, it should be a giant pebble compass.

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    Small church of Sagres

    by TinKan Written Mar 26, 2003

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    Small church of Sagres

    This small church is old and was used by some of the explorers that had explored the new world. The view from the church is awe inspiring and you can see forever from it.

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Sagres Off The Beaten Path

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