Coimbra Local Customs

  • Coimbra students in their robes.
    Coimbra students in their robes.
    by cachaseiro
  • Students walking down the road.
    Students walking down the road.
    by cachaseiro
  • Coimbra - Portugal
    Coimbra - Portugal
    by solopes

Best Rated Local Customs in Coimbra

  • "Queima das Fitas" (burning of the ribbons)

    by arasnosliw Written Dec 8, 2004

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    The first Thursday of May marks the beginning of the University of Coimbra's "Queima das Fitas" (burning of the ribbons) celebration, and it lasts until the following Thursday. There's a variety of concerts, a ball, and a parade. Whoever wins the concerts sponsored by each faculty is awarded with a briefcase full of ribbons.
    The students wear the traditional black suit, white shirt, and cape.
    It is tradition to cut slits at the bottom of the finalists' capes and they must sew it up with the proper faculty color thread.

    A similar ceremony exists for students graduating. These students burn narrow ribbons in chamber pots of the color corresponding to their faculty, and they exchange them for wider ones.

    the remains of black ribbons and capes on statues

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  • "Sempre em frente"

    by arasnosliw Written Dec 8, 2004

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    As a foreigner, I've experienced a lot of troubles with directions when living in Portugal. I doubt this is a local's way of saying "I don't know," but every time I asked walking directions to any location, they would respond with "sempre em frente." Now that loosely translates to keep going straight or just ahead. I know that most places I was trying to find weren't just straight ahead. If someone doesn't know names of streets for you to turn on, they will simply point in the general direction of where you are trying to get to and throw you a vague "sempre em frente"....Thank them graciously for their ambiguous help.

    guess what this guy pointing told us...

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  • Local wedding

    by arasnosliw Updated Aug 29, 2006

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    The Capela de São Miguel (Saint Michael's Chapel), part of the University of Coimbra campus, is a popular place to hold weddings. The ceremonies here are notoriously colorful and full of tradition.

    The wedding guests lay out black cloaks on the ground for the newly wed couple to walk upon when they exit the chapel.....The lovely ladies line up on one side of the church entrance. They're anticipating the exit of the bride and groom. On such a scorching summer day, everyone is sweating underneath the hot Iberian sun. The couple seems to be taking their time, so everyone is dripping in perspiration by this point.

    Not only flower-girls get to throw petals on the floor. After the ceremony, everyone is waiting to throw these fresh rose petals onto the black cloaks and onto the newly wedded couple.

    And the lovely newlyweds finally appear in the church entrance. Everyone's burning under the sun at this point, so they're all excited that the couple has finally exited the church. The crowd cheers in excitement while the the two duck because rice and rose petals are being pelted at their heads.

    Now the chanting begins. The cloaks are hoisted up into the air repeatedly, some unfamiliar (to me) songs/chants are sung, and the couple laughs as party goes about doing so. Then the couple is whisked away in their car to their reception...and the story continues on...

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • river bathing

    by arasnosliw Written Dec 8, 2004

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    Although Portugal's economy is not as strong as other Western European countries, it is far from being classified as a developing country. I was rather shocked to see the amount of people bathing in the Mondego River. I'm talking about a full-scrub, not just swimming around. It was interesting to notice the underlying poverty even in such a charming city like Coimbra.

    river bathing

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    The student robes.

    by cachaseiro Written Jun 21, 2009

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    At the university of Coimbra the graduate students wear the traditional kinda robes that you see in many universities around the world.
    In Coimbra they have a tradition though that they get little emblems to sow on their robes.
    They will typically have one from their home town, one from their school, one from their best friend, one from their parents, etc.
    And when they graduate then they cut the robe to pieces, so at graduation time in the spring you will see many pieces of black clothing lying around Coimbra, especially around the university and that is because the students just graduated.

    Coimbra students in their robes. Students walking down the road.
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    • Historical Travel

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    I thought this was a student town?

    by acemj Updated Mar 8, 2003

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    While walking around Coimbra, we saw more elderly people than young people. This lady was standing there talking to her friend for about ten minutes. She would wave her hands around and gesture and the basket never budged!

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    Queima das Fitas

    by acemj Written Mar 8, 2003

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    The first Thursday in May marks the beginning of the Burning of the Ribbons festival, which is a student led celebration of the end of the academic year. There are concerts and parades and more importantly, beer drinking to rival Munich's Oktoberfest.

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    NEVER, but really NEVER...

    by rp6686 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    NEVER, but really NEVER, applaud when listening to Fado de Coimbra (typical portuguese type of music). People will be offended if you do so. Instead, if you really like what you are listening just give a slight cough on the end of each song.
    Sometimes, groups of universitary students join on the street, at night, and sing fado for a couple of hours... believe me, it's worth to watch/ listen to.

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  • Chus69's Profile Photo

    QUEIMA DAS FITAS

    by Chus69 Updated Apr 28, 2003

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    This is a great party where people enjoy with music, drinks and food during near a week in June. I'm waiting my sister send me a photo of this cultural event. It takes place around all the cuty, and all is sound, colour and beer!!

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    Imperial memories

    by solopes Updated Dec 22, 2013

    People strongly condemn the objectives behind the building of a theme park named "Portugal dos Pequeninos" - propaganda to the nationalist regime of Salazar.

    Several decades later the park remains, its political purposes are gone (most young people don't even understand how it worked) but the park keeps being attractive to children, and a nice instrument for any adult to identify the architectural difference from north to south Portugal, and even in some places where Portuguese have been and let their signs.

    ...And also to understand how education may be manipulated to build convictions and illusions.

    Coimbra - Portugal Coimbra - Portugal Coimbra - Portugal Coimbra - Portugal
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    "Bazofias"

    by solopes Updated Aug 3, 2011

    People in Coimbra treat the river with love, even forgiving its occasional excesses. That's why the river is locally called "O bazófias", which means the brag.

    As a matter of fact flooding is not serious in Coimbra, but the same may not be said about the planes from the city to Figueira da Foz. A small weir is closed almost all year, giving the river a look that risks to make visitors think that its nickname is unfair.

    Coimbra - Portugal
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    • Historical Travel

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    Long term lodging

    by solopes Updated Dec 22, 2013

    "Republicas" is the name given in Coimbra for collective lodging managed by the students.

    You have the contacts of all the known republicas in:

    http://www.regiaocentro.net/lugares/coimbra/universidade/republicas/index.html

    Many students do also rent a room, alone or with some friends. It's common to have advertising in the universities in September.
    The students association - http://www.academica.pt/Default4.aspx?tabId=1865 is also a good place to search.

    Both pages are only in Portuguese, but... with not start to learn right now?

    Coimbra - Portugal
    Related to:
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    • Arts and Culture

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  • evilprebil's Profile Photo

    Praxe

    by evilprebil Written Feb 11, 2007

    One of the most interesting traditions in Portugal is Praxa, which is basically the traditional hazing of freshman in the universities by the older students. Widely spread throughout Portugal, it was highly evident in the town that housed the oldest university (700 years).
    We saw lots of silly things (such as a sort of elephant chain of 30 freshman walking in the middle of campus) and heard lots of singing which I am sure would have been hilarious if our knowledge of the language had allowed us to understand.
    As with any other tradition, there are of course people who take things to far, but it seemed to be more or less enjoyed by all. Very interesting to see. This was the end of September so I imagine thats the best time to experience it.

    Also, there is Quiema das Fitas (burning of the ribbons) at theend of the school year.

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    • Study Abroad

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  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Graffiti

    by King_Golo Written Aug 21, 2014

    I've hardly ever seen a city with as many graffiti as Coimbra. While very often graffiti are just bloated letters with a sprayer's tag, Coimbra's graffiti is almost always political. We've seen lots of interesting and most often quite left-wing messages, and unlikely as it may seem, they sometimes even add to the appearance of a building. Granted, quite a few destroy the clean image of a cream-coloured facade, but on a dilapidated old building - why not?
    Being an old university city, Coimbra must produce its fair share of politically interested and active students. We were still surprised about the sheer amount of graffiti. As my Portuguese is virtually non-existent I'd like to use this tip as a task for the VT community. Can you help me translating the Portuguese graffiti on my pictures? Thanks in advance!

    Please help with translating the graffiti! Please help with translating the graffiti! Please help with translating the graffiti! Please help with translating the graffiti!
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    • Arts and Culture

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  • ginguba's Profile Photo

    Taste it!

    by ginguba Written Mar 11, 2003

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    Still in Piodão, in any of the shops, you can buy the traditional honey and aguardente de medronho (it's an arbutus berry brandy) - hot- and some cool craftwork.

    shop

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Coimbra Local Customs

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