Coimbra Things to Do

  • view from the bridge
    view from the bridge
    by Rita.E
  • Banco de Portugal (Coimbra, Portugal)
    Banco de Portugal (Coimbra, Portugal)
    by Redang
  • River Mondego (Coimbra, Portugal)
    River Mondego (Coimbra, Portugal)
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Most Recent Things to Do in Coimbra

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    Portugal dos Pequeninos

    by solopes Updated Jul 6, 2014
    Coimbra - Portugal dos pequeninos
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    Made under the policy of Salazar's dictatorship, this garden intended to develop in the children the idea of empire, showing a rich and large Portugal, from Minho to Timor, passing through all the provinces and colonies.

    The empire was gone, democracy took its place, but the garden keeps being a funny place for the kids, and an excellent place for adults understand the architectural differences inside Portugal, and the insidious ways that can be used to manipulate children (and not only...).

    Entrance costs 8.95€ to adults and 5.95€ to seniors and children over 2 years, with special prices to families and school groups.

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    Santa Clara

    by solopes Updated Jul 6, 2014
    Coimbra - Santa Clara
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    A convent located in the hills facing Coimbra provides one of the best views of town.

    Furthermore, the church from the XVI century with the tomb of Isabel the "Rainha Santa" (Holy Queen), and the baroque cloister invites you in.

    Why not? It's cool!

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    Botanic garden

    by solopes Updated Jul 1, 2014

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    Coimbra -Botanic garden

    Planned by the Natural History Museum created by the Marques de Pombal (yes, the same that rebuilt Lisbon after the earthquake), the garden, close to the university, is a romantic place for student lovers, but also a real natural world.

    More than one million of different plants demonstrate the international cooperation, and statues, fountains, a laboratory, a chapel from the XVIII century and a library are part of that world.

    The western door (in the photo) was made in 1791 and dedicated to queen Maria I. But... most couples visiting it don't even notice...

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    Biblioteca Joanina

    by King_Golo Written May 23, 2014
    Slightly illegal picture of Biblioteca Joanina

    Having worked in Oxford for four years, I would say I'm quite used to lovely old-fashioned libraries. However, when I first set foot into Coimbra's Biblioteca Joanina my Oxford library memories simply seemed to fade away. I was stunned by the sheer beauty of this library. To me, it's one of the most spectacular buildings of the world. In fact, I'm not the only person to have recognized that: the Daily Telegraph mentions Biblioteca Joanina in its list of spectacular libraries.

    So, what's so special about it? Commissioned by King João V the Magnanimous in 1716 who financed it with earnings from gold production in Brazil and looking pretty normal from the outside, the library is a Baroque masterpiece from the inside. On the aptly named "Noble Floor" some 30,000 books are stored on its 72 shelves that are as majestic as can be. Decorated with Chinese motives and filigree carvings, they make up the most of the room, covering every wall. It took Manuel da Silva 40 months to complete all the decorations! Special ladder constructions enable the lucky ones who are allowed to borrow a book from here to access those stored in the upper half of the shelves. Looking up the shelves, you'll be amazed at the next spectacular part of Biblioteca Joanina - its painted ceiling by António Simões Ribeiro and Vicente Nunes. Best of all: the Noble Floor consists of three rooms, so there's a lot to admire!

    Still, this is not enough. The library's interior is kept at a constant temperature of about 19°C which is due to its enormously massive walls. According to the brochure on display, they are 2.11m thick! Moreover, the rooms are home to some rather strange inhabitants, namely bats. While you won't see them during the day, they come out at night and take care of the books by eating any insects that would normally be a dangerous enemy to old books. We were told that the massive wooden tables would be covered at night so that bat droppings - which weren't visible anywhere - couldn't destroy the valuable wood. Altogether, it sounded like a story to good to be believed, but it's true.

    Biblioteca Joanina is, in my opinion, a must-see for every visitor to Portugal. You can only see the library as part of a general visit to the university. At a price of € 8.50 or so, it may seem expensive at first, but it's definitely worth it. When buying a ticket, you will be told a specific time when you can enter the library. Don't miss it, or you've forfeited your right to visit it and need a new ticket. Tickets can be bought at the University Shop in the General Library.

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    Lush gardens

    by King_Golo Written Apr 27, 2014

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    Leaf silhouettes
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    Coimbra's Jardim Botânico is a beautiful space with lots of old trees, blooming flowers, an avenue of lime trees as well as some benches next to a fountain to relax and admire the view. There is also a huge Ficus Estrangularia tree just next to the greenhouses that you should not miss. We came here on a hot day and were grateful for some shade of which the lush gardens have more than enough.
    Founded in 1772, the Jardim Botânico is allegedly the fifth-oldest botanical garden in the world. Moreover, it's often described as one of the most beautiful ones as well. In view of this, we found it quite strange that there were hardly any people in the park when we went there. After all, it's only five minutes away from the city's main sights.
    The Jardim Botânico is divided into several parts. The upper part is dominated by a square of approximately 100x100m (Quadrado Central) with neat flower beds everywhere and paths crisscrossing it. A fountain marks the middle of it. Around the upper part, there are other less spick and span areas all of which were closed for the public at the time of our visit. The same was true for the lower part, the arboretum. It makes up the best part of a natural valley and immediately makes you forget that you are in the middle of a big city. The trees, among them 50 different species of eucalyptus and a bamboo thicket, are so high and their canopy is so dense that you will feel as though you are in some jungle.
    There is also the so-called Sky Garden, a sort of adventure park where you can navigate your way through the canopy of the trees. It was closed as well, but from what we could see the Sky Garden is huge and boasts some excellent routes high above the ground. I'll give it a try next time!
    The gardens are open daily from 9am to 8pm in summer and 9am to 5.30pm in winter. There is no entrance fee.

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    Palace of Justice

    by solopes Updated Jan 5, 2014

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    Coimbra - Portugal

    Located in Sofia street, the most traditional street of low Coimbra, this is one of the classical buildings that give character and personality to that street.

    Originally a school, in the 16th century, it became later a Noble's residence, until its final adaptation, 70 years ago, to the actual use.

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    Visit the tomb of Alfonso Henriques.

    by cachaseiro Written Jul 3, 2013
    The tomb og Alfonso Henriques.

    Portugals first king Alfonso Henriques is buried inside the Santa Cruz church in Coimbra.
    He lived in the 12th century and moved the capital of Portugal to Coimbra and was therefor buried there.
    Soon the capital was moved to Lisbon so you do not have lot's of royals buried there, but you have Alfonso Henriques there and he is probaply the most important king Portugal ever had as he was the one founding the nation after defeating the moors.
    He is resting up in the back of the church next to the altar and the place has free admission so you should for sure pop in to say hello to a guy who really made history back in his day.

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. The Cloisters II.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 4, 2013

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    Christ?s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne
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    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. The Cloisters.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 2, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cloisters
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    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    • Architecture
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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Sacristy

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sacristy
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. The Pulpit.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

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    Pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521
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    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Chapels.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne.
    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. National Pantheon.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    High Altar&National Pantheon
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Interiors.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne.
    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Sacristy III.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sacristy
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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