Coimbra Things to Do

  • view from the bridge
    view from the bridge
    by Rita.E
  • Banco de Portugal (Coimbra, Portugal)
    Banco de Portugal (Coimbra, Portugal)
    by Redang
  • River Mondego (Coimbra, Portugal)
    River Mondego (Coimbra, Portugal)
    by Redang

Most Recent Things to Do in Coimbra

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Palace of Justice

    by solopes Updated Jan 5, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Coimbra - Portugal

    Located in Sofia street, the most traditional street of low Coimbra, this is one of the classical buildings that give character and personality to that street.

    Originally a school, in the 16th century, it became later a Noble's residence, until its final adaptation, 70 years ago, to the actual use.

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    Visit the tomb of Alfonso Henriques.

    by cachaseiro Written Jul 3, 2013
    The tomb og Alfonso Henriques.

    Portugals first king Alfonso Henriques is buried inside the Santa Cruz church in Coimbra.
    He lived in the 12th century and moved the capital of Portugal to Coimbra and was therefor buried there.
    Soon the capital was moved to Lisbon so you do not have lot's of royals buried there, but you have Alfonso Henriques there and he is probaply the most important king Portugal ever had as he was the one founding the nation after defeating the moors.
    He is resting up in the back of the church next to the altar and the place has free admission so you should for sure pop in to say hello to a guy who really made history back in his day.

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. The Cloisters II.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 4, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Christ?s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. The Cloisters.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 2, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cloisters
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Sacristy

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sacristy
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. The Pulpit.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Chapels.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne.
    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. National Pantheon.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    High Altar&National Pantheon
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Interiors.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne.
    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Sacristy III.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sacristy
    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz. Sacristy II.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne. And here is the pulpit made by Nicola de Chanterenne in 1521.

    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.

    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

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    Mosteiro de Santa Cruz

    by Oleg_D. Written May 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The monastery was founded in 1131 under the patronage of Dom Afonso Henriques the first King of Portugal and actual Father of nation. He granted that monastery to the order of Augustinian Canons. Among famous scholars of the monastery school was Saint Anthony of Lisbon better known to public as Saint Antonio of Padua, who joined the Grey Friars (Franciscan Order) at Coimbra. The Romanesque church was designed by the French master builder Robert. Unfortunately monastery was decaying step by step due to human negligence. Things changed totally in beginning of XVI century. King Manuel I being the wise ruler quite understood that his kingdom and nation urgently needed the national symbols. That’s why he decided to spend a lot of money received as the rewards for Portuguese geographical discoveries and colonial policy to restore that monastery.
    Manueline work of first quarter of XVI century includes the vaulting attributed to Boitaca and the throne dating from 1513 crowned with decoration alluding to the Portuguese geographical discoveries. King Manuel I also commissioned the rebuilding of royal tombs of King Afonso Henriques I and his son King Sancho I. Both tombs are Renaissance in style and are fruit of the work of Nicolas Chanterenne. The bodies of Afonso Henriques and Sancho I the first two kings of Portugal rest in elegant funerary chests in the chancel. There were neither Television and radio nor newspapers in the time King Manuel. But he well understood that a lot of pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela will visit this place and they will be deeply impressed with such magnificent Royal Tombs. And he also understood that the pilgrims will spread rumors about these luxurious tombs and magnanimity of Portuguese King and his Kingdom through all Christian World. Yes, he was the great national leader! The high altar with these Royal tombs became the National Pantheon. The facade of the monastery combines Romanesque structural elements with XVIth-century decoration around the main doorway. The Triumphal Arch in front of the church entrance dates from the 19th century. Behind the monastery buildings is the lovely Manga Garden which used to be the Monastery’s bath. Formerly known as the Manga Fountain, it formed the centerpiece of one of the 3 cloisters of the monastery. The XVIth century Cloister of Silence is Manueline in style and has four bas-reliefs with scenes of Christ’s Passion by Nicola de Chanterenne.
    Non commercial photo without flashlight and tripod is allowed.
    Mon. - Sat.: 9 a.m. – 12:30 – 5 p.m.
    Sun.: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
    Public holidays: mornings only.
    Free entry
    To visit the Sacristy, Chapter House, Cloisters and Exhibition:
    Ordinary ticket: € 2.50
    Age 65 & over, & students: € 1.50
    For school visits, permission must be obtained in advance from the Church.

    Related to:
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    • Architecture

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    Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha

    by Oleg_D. Written May 1, 2013

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    This female convent was founded in 1283 by the Abbess Dona Mor Dias and given to Clarisse nuns shortly afterwards. Dona Isabel of Aragon also known as the Queen St. Isabel took great interest in that convent and built a new church in Gothic style here. That monastery became later the resting place of Queen Isabel's remains and she herself became the Patron Saint of Coimbra. That church was consecrated in 1330. This monastery also housed the remains of murdered Dona Ines de Castro. Her remains were transferred to Alcobaca.
    The site of the convent proved a bad choice due to seasonal flooding from the River Mondego flowing nearby. In spite of all the drainage and conservation efforts the church and the Monastery were abandoned in 1677 and the community of nuns transferred to Santa Clara a Nova located uphill over of the original Monastery a few hundred meters away.
    The tomb of the Saint-Queen was also transferred there.

    Convent of Santa Clara is the National Monument Archaeological site of XIVth–XVIIth centuries now. Guided visits are available. There are shop and cafeteria with terrace in the Convent museum. Disabled access is available.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed inside of the buildings.

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    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Old Cathedral (Sé Velha) of Coimbra, Nothern Nave

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 28, 2013

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    Northern Nave
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    In the North nave of Cathedral you can see altar of XVI century. Unfortunately that altar is not in the ideal condition.

    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.
    Open:
    Daily: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., except Fri. 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.
    Note: Visits limited during services.
    Free admission
    Visit to the Gothic cloisters and the Biblical Garden:
    Ordinary ticket - € 1.50

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    • Religious Travel
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    • Architecture

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    Old Cathedral (Sé Velha) of Coimbra, Perspectives.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 28, 2013

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    ?Porta Especiosa? (Beautiful Gate)
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    Why SE? Because that acronym derives from Latin “Sedes Episcopalis” which means Episcopal Residence. The Old cathedral was founded by the first King of Portugal Afonso Henriques in second half of the 12th century and was consecrated in 1184. Its exterior designed by the French master Robert is sturdy and symmetrical, with narrow window-slits and crenellated roof.
    The main doorway shows obvious Islamic influence, while the side door, known as the ‘Porta Especiosa’ (Beautiful Door), attributed to João de Ruão (Jean of Rouen), has elegant Plateresque decoration of XVI century. The high altar retable, flamboyantly Gothic was made about 1498 by the Flemish sculptors Olivier de Gand and Jean d'Ypres. The Mannerist-style altarpiece in the Holy Sacrament chapel was made in 1566.
    At the square in front of Cathedral Dom Joao the Master of Order of Aviz was proclaimed King of Portugal Joao I.
    One thousand years old olive tree still grows near the apse of the Cathedral. This tree saw Afonso Henriques, Juan I of Avis and Saint Constable of Portugal Nuno Alvares Pereira.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.
    Open:
    Daily: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., except Fri. 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.
    Note: Visits limited during services.
    Free admission
    Visit to the Gothic cloisters and the Biblical Garden:
    Ordinary ticket - € 1.50

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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