Alcobaça Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by J_Antunes
  • Things to Do
    by J_Antunes
  • Things to Do
    by J_Antunes

Most Recent Things to Do in Alcobaça

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    Going north

    by solopes Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    Leave Alcobaca towards Leiria, and, after 7 kms, stop a couple of minutes in Aljubarrota, to ear the funny story (not for 7 spanish soldiers) of the "padeira". Continue to S. Jorge, where you may visit the museum of the most celebrated battle in Portugal. Proceed to Batalha, and dedicate a reasonable time to the monastery (UNESCO heritage, and specially, my marriage place in 1979). I forbid you to miss the "Capelas Imperfeitas", a gem where you can see mixed four architectural styles. Take your time... It deserves it.

    Lunch time shall take you 12 kms north, to Leiria, but don't stop there. Proceed straight to "Marrazes" and enjoy the adventure of eating at "Tromba Rija". It's an overwhelming experience, sometimes requiring a previous reserve. If you have the misfortune of not getting a table, walk across the street to "Casinha Velha". You won't regret.
    Now it's time to go back to Leiria, and with such a powerful lunch, you are strong enough to climb to the castle. The views are interesting. Coming down, walk a while in the narrow streets around "Praca Rodrigues Lobo".
    The way back to Alcobaça can be done via Marinha Grande, where, with time, you may go to the excelent Glass Museum, in the center of town. Finnaly, 7 kms before Alcobaca, Atlantis is a superior class crystal producer, with visitor center and shops, close to the recently opened to the public beautiful convent of Cós

    Batalha - Portugal Alcoba��a - Portugal Leiria - Portugal Marinha Grande - Portugal
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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça

    by Oleg_D. Updated Feb 16, 2013

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    The Alcobaça Monastery is one of the first foundations of the Cistercian Order in Portugal. It was founded in 1153 as a gift to Bernard of Clairvaux, shortly before his death, from the first Portuguese King, Afonso Henriques, to commemorate his victory over the Moors at Santarem in March 1147. The foundation of the monastery was part of the strategy by Afonso Henriques to consolidate his authority in the new kingdom and promote the colonization of areas recently taken from Moorish hands during the Reconquista.
    The building of the monastery began in 1178, some 25 years after the arrival of the Cistercian monks in the Alcobaca region. Initially, the monks lived in wooden houses, and only moved to the new stone monastery buildings in 1223. The church was completed in 1252. The finished church and monastery were the first truly Gothic buildings in Portugal, and the church was the largest in Portugal. The last touch in the mediaeval ensemble was given in the late 13th century, when King Dinis I ordered the construction of the Gothic cloister, the Cloister of Silence.

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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça, part II.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Feb 10, 2013

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    Columns and walls are devoid of decoration, as required in Cistercian churches, and the interior is very brightly illuminated by rows of windows on the walls and rose windows on the main façade and transept arms. But that doesn’t mean church had no sculptures and icons. All statues and benches were used as the fire wood by the French troops during Peninsular War. A lot of the church property disappeared during the Civil War of 1820-1834. Anyway the internal structures of the church are still stunning the visitors. I was very impressed.

    The main chapel, like in Clairvaux, is surrounded by a gallery (ambulatory) and has a series of radiating chapels. The aisles are covered by simple Gothic vaulting.

    Opening Hours
    October to March
    From 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. (last admission at 4.30 p.m.)
    April to September
    From 9.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. (last admission at 6.30 p.m.)
    The ticket office closes 30 minutes before the Monastery’s closing time.
    Closed: 1 January, Easter Sunday, 1 May and 25 December

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça, part VII.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 9, 2013

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    The chapel of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux the famous Cistercian and instigator of the Second Crusade is located in the South side of the transept. It has a sculptural group depicting the "Death of Saint Bernard" made in XVII th-century. In each side of the chapel are buried Kings of Portugal Afonso II and Afonso III.
    Opening Hours
    October to March
    From 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. (last admission at 4.30 p.m.)
    April to September
    From 9.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. (last admission at 6.30 p.m.)
    The ticket office closes 30 minutes before the Monastery’s closing time.
    Closed: 1 January, Easter Sunday, 1 May and 25 December

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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça, part VI.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 9, 2013

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    Royal Pantheon is situated in the so-called Neo Gothic Chapel. The entrance to Neo Gothic Chapel is in the South wing of the transept near the King Pedro tomb. The Royal Pantheon has the 13th century tombs of the Queens of Portugal, Urraca of Castile and Beatrix of Castile, married respectively to Kings Afonso II and Afonso III. There are also smaller tombs of unidentified princes. The most decorated tomb is that of Queen Urraca who died in 1220.

    Opening Hours
    October to March
    From 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. (last admission at 4.30 p.m.)
    April to September
    From 9.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. (last admission at 6.30 p.m.)
    The ticket office closes 30 minutes before the Monastery’s closing time.
    Closed: 1 January, Easter Sunday, 1 May and 25 December

    The Queen Urraca's tomb The Queen Urraca's tomb
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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça, part V.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 9, 2013

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    OK, why the Inez de Castro’s tomb is so interesting for me and what kind of valuable information I receive from it’s bas-relief. OK! There are a lot of figures of men at arms carved on the tomb sides. That means any researcher of that period can see the appearance of Portuguese man at arms of last quarter of XIV. So, the Portuguese knights or “homen de armas” during the battle of Aljubarrota were looking like as the guys on the tomb. Thanks to unknown master!

    Men at arms Men at arms Man at arms Man at arms Man at arms
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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça, part IV.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 9, 2013

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    The Inez’s tomb is decorated with scenes from the life of Jesus Christ, including the Crucifixion and with the Last Judgment. And her tomb is much more interesting for me because it provides a lot of valuable information about the last quarter of XIV century.

    The Inez de Castro's tomb The Inez de Castro's tomb The Inez de Castro's tomb The Inez de Castro's tomb The Inez de Castro's tomb
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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça, part III.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 9, 2013

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    There are tombs of King Pedro I and his mistress Ines de Castro assassinated in 1355 under the orders of Peter's father King Afonso IV in the transept of the church. After becoming King, Pedro ordered the remains of his beloved to be transferred to her tomb in Alcobaça and, according to a popular legend, made her be crowned as Queen of Portugal and ordered court members to pay her homage by kissing her decomposing hand.
    Nobody knows who made the tombs of Pedro and Inez but they are among the best works of gothic sculpture in Portugal. The King’s tomb is supported by lions and half-men half-beasts in the case of Inez, and both carry the recumbent figures of the deceased assisted by a group of angels. The sides of Pedro's tomb are magnificently decorated with bas-reliefs showing the scenes from Saint Bartholomew's life, as well as scenes from Pedro and Inez's own lives.

    The tomb of Pedro I The tomb of Pedro I The tomb of Pedro I The tomb of Pedro I The tomb of Pedro I
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  • gubbi1's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Don Pedro I.

    by gubbi1 Written May 1, 2012

    Inside of the monastery church, close to the tomb of Inês de Castro, you will find the one of Don Pedro I. He lived from 1320 to 1367. Already during his youth Dom Pedro had problems in the relation to his father King Afonso IV. He organized a forced marriage to strengthen the relation to Castile. Once grown up Pedro refused the marriage. Later Afonso managed another forced mariage for Pedro. With his new wife also Inês de Castro came into his life and they fell in love. Once his wife died at the birth of their child, Dom Pedro officially went into relation with Inês de Castro. But Afonso ordered her to court and sentenced her to death. As Dom Pedro became king he ordered two tombs for him and Inês, which he requested to be placed into the monastery church side by side to be close to her once he was dead.

    Tomb of Don Pedro I, Alcobaca, PT
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    Tomb of Inês de Castro

    by gubbi1 Written May 1, 2012

    Inside of the monastery church you will find the tomb of Inês de Castro. She was born in 1320 and died in 1355 because she got executed. King Afonso IV. father of Don Pedro I. was against the relation of Don Pedro I. to Inês as she became Pedros loved on after his wife died as a consquence of giving birth to their child. King Afonso found a reason to put her on court and there she was sentenced to death.
    After Don Pedro I. became king, he ordered the production of his and her tomb, which were set up in the monastery church side by side to be close together.

    Tomb of In��s de Castro, Alcobaca, PT
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    Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça

    by gubbi1 Written May 1, 2012

    According to a saying it was Afonso Henriques who promised to Saint Maria that he would donate a monastery if he could recapture the stronghold of the moors in Santarem. He managed and shortly after donated the monastery here in Alcobaca. This donation has ben proofed to have taken place in 1153. In 1833 the monastery was abandoned by the monchs, but nowadays is an important touristic site.
    The monastery church is the largest of Portugal. Inside you can visit beautiful cloisters and see the very richly decorated tombs of Don Pedro I. and Inês de Castro.

    Mosteiro de Santa Maria, Alcobaca, PT Mosteiro de Santa Maria, Alcobaca, PT Mosteiro de Santa Maria, Alcobaca, PT
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  • dila's Profile Photo

    Monastery of Alcobaca

    by dila Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The abbey of Santa Maria de Alcobaca was founded in 1153 by the first Portugees king Afonso Henrigues.

    open
    9.00 to 17.00 october to march
    9.00 to 19.00 april to september
    closed on 1 januari, good friday, easter sunday, 1 may and christmas day

    guided visits by reservation only
    tel +351 262 50 5120 / 8

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    Ginja by the Glass at the Capador

    by MarioPortugal Written Oct 23, 2006

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    The Capador is a tavern established in 1919. It the past visitors in Alcobaça were welcome to guard their horses in the back room, that very same back room where nowadays the general public seat, drink and chat.

    More recently this tavern become known for its ginja by the glass. Tradition still brings a lot of the older customers and senior people as well, which is good. Funny curiosity is that the Capador has been able to reinvent itself. Nowadays younger crowds fill the seats during the evenings. Specially on Friday's & Saturday's nights.

    Coming to the Capador and ask for a ginja is a must. It will keep the tradition alive.

    Unfortunately the ginja being sold by the glass is not the best I've ever tried. It's not even the traditional David Pinto's ginja made in Alcobaça !! - The owner claims the David Pinto's ginja is way too expensive. Anyway, just for the sake of the tradition and also for the fun of enjoying a shot of ginga, it's worth to pay the Capador a visit.

    a b c d e

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    The Cardinal's Cloister

    by mikelisaanna Written Jul 9, 2006

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    The Cardinal's Cloister is the middle of Alcobaca's three cloisters. It was built as an addition to the monastery in the 1500s. It is currently closed to the public, but you can get a view of it from the rooms off the second floor of the adjacent Cloister of Silence.

    The Cardinal's Cloister
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    The Cloister of Silence

    by mikelisaanna Written Jul 8, 2006

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    The Cloister of Silence is adjacent to the monastery's church and is a cloister that encloses a courtyard with orange trees. It has two rows of walkways surrounding it, both of which are open to the public.

    The Cloister of Silence with its orange trees A hallway in the Cloister of Silence
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