Óbidos Local Customs

  • Rooster of Good Luck & Happiness
    Rooster of Good Luck & Happiness
    by LoriPori
  • Obidos - Portugal
    Obidos - Portugal
    by solopes
  • Obidos - Portugal
    Obidos - Portugal
    by solopes

Best Rated Local Customs in Óbidos

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    Azulejos

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Sep 16, 2009

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    Azulejos in Our Lady of Piety Oratory

    A fine example of glazed ceramic decorative tiles greets you as you enter the town of Obidos through its main gate, the 'Porta da Vila'. This custom derived from the hundreds of years of Moorish occupation and has been adopted by the Portugese and developed to a high state of art.

    This oratory, built in the 1700s and dedicated to Our Lady of Piety, provides a perfect place within the gate to put on a show for the town's visitors. As I was trying to take this photo, I had to jostle for position because of large crowd of French tourists had just disembarked from a bus and their guide was trying to explain this to them. At the same time, delivery trucks were trying to squeeze through this old and narrow gate!

    I was glad to escape up onto the battlements - but the scene was actually very quiet when we later exited through here.

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    Windmill

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Oct 16, 2004

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    Windmill at Obidos

    I like windmills and always want to take photos of them. However, on this trip, we had passed by a few early on in our jaunt around the country and, for one reason or another, I did not make the time to stop for a shot. I thought I had blown my chances until, as we were almost finished our trip, they started popping up on the hillsides in the Estremadura region northwest of Lisbon!

    This particular windmill, located just outside the town and photographed as I stood on the ramparts of its defensive walls, is representative of the type that you will mostly see in mainland Portugal. However, there is another style used in the Azores, with more Dutch flavour to it. The windmills in mainland Portugal were mostly used to grind the grain that was harvested from the fields.

    This windmill has a solid cylindrical base, made of either bricks or stone. The upper wooden section is able to pivot, allowing the sails (normally made of canvas) to catch the ocean breezes prevalent in this area. I recently saw an internet advert for the sale of a windmill exactly like this one (in fact, I think it is this very windmill) going for E135,000 for conversion into living quarters!

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    Whitewashed Houses & Ornate Chimneys

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Oct 18, 2004

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    Colourful Houses & Ornate Chimney

    This photo shows a hilly sidewalk scene in Obidos, illustrating some of the features common to the houses of this part of Portugal. The whitewash on their walls performs a number of functions, including protecting the walls from pests and deflecting the heat of the summer sun. It is also the custom to decorate the buildings with either blue or yellow highlight paint.

    Another carryover from the years of Moorish occupation can just barely be seen in the chimney of this house. Its decorative construction is common in these southern parts of Portugal, all the way to the Algarve, because this is where the Moorish occupation lasted the longest.

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    ROOSTER OF GOOD LUCK & HAPPINESS

    by LoriPori Written Jun 12, 2009

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    Rooster of Good Luck & Happiness

    According to local Portuguese legend, it was the crowing of a roasted rooster that saved a journeying pilgrim, condemned to hang for a murder he did not commit. This act of faith inspired the Portuguese to elect a new household mascot - the gaily painted ROOSTER OF GOOD LUCK AND HAPPINESS.
    You will find colourful, painted souvenir roosters everywhere you go in Portugal.

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    Internet access

    by micas_pt Written Feb 8, 2004

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    If you need or want to stay connected while visiting Obidos, you will find an Internet space in main street (Rua Direita). On photo you may see the main entrance to this space, which is identified with the yellow sign showing the Town Hall's website: www.cm-obidos.pt. This Internet space is opposite to church Santa Maria.

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    Miradouro

    by micas_pt Written Feb 8, 2004

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    Miradouro is the Portuguese word for belvedere or viewpoint. While strolling through Obido's main street you will notice this sign several times. If you follow the sign you will go into a belvedere and enjoy great views over the village and its surroundings. Be sure not to miss, as they can be quite pleasant on sunny days.

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    Azulejos

    by micas_pt Written Feb 8, 2004

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    Azulejos are traditional Portuguese tiles. If you notice carefully the houses and churches in Obidos you will see some beautiful examples of this ancient arts craft. Some of them are covered in azulejos, either inside or outside, and some of them will have smaller or bigger panels depicting some scene. Azulejos are hand painted tiles and can be found in blue and white shades or coloured, depending on theme, epoch and place.

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  • pão com chouriço and ginjinha

    by arasnosliw Updated Mar 29, 2005

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    local girl selling portuguese specialties

    While exploring the crooked streets of Óbidos, you will most certainly run into some local specialties. Try a bit of pão com chouriço (bread with sausage baked inside). Found at almost every bakery and breadshop, it is a tasty little snack. For drink, try the popular alcoholic beverage ginjinha. Ginjinha is a liquor made by fermenting ginja (similar to cherries) in brandy. Ginjinha is served in a shot form usually with a piece of the fermented fruit on the bottom of the cup, although it can also be served without the fruit. Although a little too sweet for my tastes, it is certainly something unique that visitors should try.

    Crikey, my accents are not showing up, so if you cannot read what I just wrote, it is "pao com chorico" without accents.

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    Local sweets, biscuits and cakes

    by angiebabe Written Nov 1, 2006

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    entrance rd from carpark and stalls with biscuits

    At the main entrance where the bulk of the tourists arrive by the busloads and cars to the carpark are stand by local women selling locally made biscuits, cakes and sweets.
    I enjoyed the opportunity to chat to one of them and discuss recommended ones ie her favourites and information about them, and bought two different types to try something of the locality.
    One was a huge biscuit with peanuts , for euro 80cents, and though quite hard and sweet, as already advised, it fed my liking for biscuits with peanuts (a kiwi thing! we make peanut biscuits from our famous Edmonds cookbook from way back in our childhoods!! but with cocoa) and it was rather delicious.

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  • get down and dirty with your food

    by arasnosliw Updated Mar 29, 2005

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    eat, drink, be merry

    I attended a medieval fair in Obidos, and so in this theme they tried to make us eat with our hands (or these ridiculously large forks). My clay dish full of meat and rice was pretty tasty; I forget the portuguese names of them. Espaldas??!

    Anyway, it was quite an amusing experience to eat with this fork that wouldn't even fit properly into my mouth. Drinking red wine under the hot sun certainly didn't help my coordination any.

    Pardon this photo; I look about half my age in it. Haha. Am I really that juvenile acting?

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  • belly dancing

    by arasnosliw Written Mar 25, 2005

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    shaking faster than I'll ever be able to

    So you might be thinking, "What, belly dancing is a local custom?" Well, I was attending a medieval festival in Obidos, and Portugal was ruled by the Moors (of North African descent) from the 8th to the 13th centuries. Hence, much of Portugal's culture has been influenced by their long presence. With that said, they were showcasing belly dancers as part of Portugal's mixed heritage, and the lady is supposed to represent one from that time period of their ruling. Yes indeed, the Portuguese have adopted belly dancing into their own culture.

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    Post Office

    by micas_pt Written Feb 8, 2004

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    On the right side of main street, close to church Santa Maria, you will find the post office. Post office in Portuguese is Correios. This particular Post Office is located on a mannor house. The opening hours are:
    . Weekdays: 9am to 12.30pm; 2.30pm to 6pm.

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    Medieval Fair - old fashion barbecued meat

    by MarioPortugal Updated Jul 25, 2006

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    2 more images

    During the Medieval Fair that annually has been taking place in Óbidos since 2002, and in this 2006 year it run from July 13th to the 23rd, MEAT is barbecued in really big portions, like the way of the old medieval times.

    Suggestion: you may check out my travelogue for more pictures of Óbidos' Medieval time.

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    The Aqueduct

    by MarioPortugal Updated Jul 29, 2006

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    a
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    Built by the order of Queen Catarina of Austria, wife of D. João III, King of Portugal.

    The Aqueduct is about 3 Km (approx 2 miles) long and was set to provide fresh water to the city.

    I've read on my recent research that Queen Catarina paid for the Aqueducts' full construction herself and got reimbursed with the property of some nearby agricultural fields. The Aqueduct was built in 1573.

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  • the lazy one

    by arasnosliw Written Mar 25, 2005

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    her all of 5 minute routine

    While the other belly dancer wearing red was strutting her stuff in the hot sun for hours, this one in yellow was a lazy little gal. Her counterpart would dance about 95 per cent of the time, while she put in a mere 5 per cent. I don't know if it was because she was lazy or because they didn't think she was good enough to do the bulk of performance. Her counterpart was certainly a lot better.

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Óbidos Local Customs

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