Cascais Local Customs

  • Picture of the harbor from our hotel
    Picture of the harbor from our hotel...
    by Lindaonwheels
  • Main square overlooking the Harbour
    Main square overlooking the Harbour
    by LoriPori
  • Town Hall
    Town Hall
    by LoriPori

Most Recent Local Customs in Cascais

  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Cascais is still a fishing town.

    by cachaseiro Written Jun 13, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Despite having evolved in to an upper class neighbourhood the past few decades, Cascais has still kept the fishing business going and it´s something they work hard on keeping and they celebrate the fishermen every year with a festival in august nd the locals are generally proud to still have a functioning fishing community and in my opinion this is something that makes the place a lot more attractive as it´s then more than just another holiday town with hotels and beaches.

    Fisherman in Cascais.
    Related to:
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lindaonwheels's Profile Photo

    Drink the local wine! Eat Seafood!

    by Lindaonwheels Written Nov 9, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Don't miss the table wine in Portugal. It is "green wine", a white wine that is decanted before it is "ready". therefore it is low in achoholic content and you can drink it like water! The "JUMBO" grocer there had hundreds of brands of this same wine. It is called "Vinho Verde", is served everywhere. Bring home a few bottles. I have only found 2 bottles of it since I got back to the US.

    Also, I strongly advise you to order fish or any seafood while in Portugal. They don't know how to do "steak" that we would recognize in the US. Seafood is great!

    Picture of the harbor from our hotel

    Was this review helpful?

  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Have some bitoque

    by marielexoteria Written Sep 28, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bitoque is a Portuguese dish made of biff, a fried egg (yolk on top), salad and rice or fries. We wanted something to eat the first night and were recommended to have this dish at Casa de Bitoques, a couple of meters away from O'Neill's and it was very, very good and not expensive at all.

    Bitoque
    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    WONDERFUL AZULEJOS - TILES

    by LoriPori Written Jul 10, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Perhaps one of my favourite things about Cascais, is the Wonderful AZULEJOS or Tiles, samples of which can be seen throughout the town from tiled street signs, tiled houses, tiled facades, etc.
    Pic # 1 Tiled sign at Cascais Town Hall
    Pic # 2 Tiled "Rua do Farol de Santa Marta"
    Pic # 3 Blue & white tiled building
    Pic # 4 Tiled mural of Cascais Harbour
    Pic # 5 Tiled facade of Cascais Town Hall

    Tiled sign at Cascais Town Hall Tiled Rus do Farol de Santa Marta Blue & white tiled building Tiled mural of Cascais Harbour Tiled facade of Town Hall

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    CALCADA PORTUGUESA

    by LoriPori Written Jul 6, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Portuguese Pavement or CALCADA PORTUGUESA is the traditional paving technique used in most pedestrian areas in Portugal and is quite prominent here in Cascais, especially in the Main Square. Black and white stone tiles are in the shape of waves to represent the sea.
    Workers - calceteiros - spend long hours laying the stones, usually for little pay, so it's no wonder that it is a dying art form.
    These paved sidewalks can also be hazardous, as they are so slippery after a rainfall. I just about fell on my butt a few times. I actually saw one lady trip and fall after getting the heel of her shoe caught on the stones which aren't always even.

    Main square overlooking the Harbour Town Hall Downtown street paved in tiles

    Was this review helpful?

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Pavements

    by toonsarah Written Jun 21, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is not just in the big cities such as Lisbon that the Portuguese display the craft known as Calçada Portuguesa. Here in Cascais too you will see the characteristic black and white mosaic patterns created through the use of small square cobbles. They are seen to particular advantage in the large square by the harbour, the Praça 5 de Outubro, where the wave-like patterns seem to mimic the water beyond. In the shopping streets too the same techniques are used to great effect.

    But there are concerns that this may be a dying craft. It is hard to attract young people to work as calceteiros, as those who lay the stones are called, as the work is laborious and not well-paid (you can see two calceteiros, photographed repairing a pavement in photo 2). Also, the stones can be slippery when wet (or even when dry, as I can testify) and are out of line with the modern emphasis on health and safety. I think it would be a real shame however if the craft of Calçada were to disappear, as these distinctive pavements are one of the elements that set a Portuguese town apart from its counterparts in other Mediterranean countries.

    Cascais pavement Mending the pavement in Cascais

    Was this review helpful?

  • DAO's Profile Photo

    PORTUGUSE FOR VT MEETINGS

    by DAO Updated Jun 10, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ordering Beer in Portuguese:

    I'm thirsty. Where can I get a good beer? Tenho sede. Onde posso beber uma cerveja?

    Is there a tavern nearby? Onde fica o café/bar/pub mais próximo?

    I would like a beer, please. Queria uma cerveja, por favor.

    A half pint of lager, please. Uma fino, por favor. (NORTHERN PORTUGAL)
    Uma imperial, por favor. (SOUTHERN PORTUGAL)

    I would like a half pint of strong ale, please. Queria uma Tuborg, por favor.

    A pint of black beer, please. Queria uma cerveja preta, por favor.

    ...draft beer... ...cerveja imperial... (SOUTH)
    ...fino... (NORTH)

    Cheers! Saúde! (or) Tchim Tchim!

    I love you guys! Can I buy you another beer? Voces são demais! Posso-vos pagar outra cerveja?

    I need a taxi. Could you call one for me, please? Eu preciso de um táxi. Poderia telefonar e chamar um taxi, por favor?

    Where's the restroom/loo? Onde fica a casa de banho?

    **please note - this is lifted directly from the wonderful website linked below**

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Budget Travel
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • mazzap's Profile Photo

    A Game to 'Confuse the Tourists'?

    by mazzap Updated Apr 2, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Seen in Cascais along a pathway - somehow this example does not seem to follow the normally perfect patterns of the "Calçada Portuguesa" that are usually enjoyed by all who choose to look down as they walk!

    My guess is that a bored workman purposely replaced this drain cover incorrectly just to see if anyone noticed! Well I did!

    Something seems wrong here....
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • ncfg's Profile Photo

    Azulejos

    by ncfg Updated Aug 30, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Cascais, just like in others towns and places in Portugal, the famous gazed tiles called by Azulejos are in several places, like houses, churches facades and interiors.

    This photo was taken on the Marechal Carmona Park, notice the beautiful tiles on the wall and the gracious pheasant that stands on the top of the wall.

    Note: the pheasant is real not painted on tiles! :-)))

    See more pics on my travelogue.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • TinKan's Profile Photo

    A little Bica

    by TinKan Written Aug 15, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As you may have found out by now, I love coffee and have to stop at every cafe anywhere I go. And the beach is no exception.

    You can find a few little coffee places along the beach area during the summer months. Stop in and have one of the best coffees in the world.

    Bica
    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • firework_101's Profile Photo

    Wierd Portuguese Customs

    by firework_101 Written Jul 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Every Second Sunday and Monday , in remembrance of Monte Piton, women in cascais meet in the town center, take off all their clothes and run around nearly naked for two days. It's quite a spectacle. bring your camera. Leave your girlfriend at home.

    Monte Piton Marathon
    Related to:
    • Gay and Lesbian
    • Women's Travel
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • TinKan's Profile Photo

    Shoping the local way

    by TinKan Updated Nov 9, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are in Cascais on the first or third Sunday of the month make sure you go to the bullring market. If you want it …. it is here.

    This is a good place to get tee shirts and pottery at local prices. This is a big market with everything you could ever want and a whole lot of stuff you do no. Do not argue too much with the gypsy’s, as you will have to fight with them all.

    The start of the market
    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Churches

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 6, 2009

    While exploring the old Cascais village you will bump into several churches, besides the 2 well-known Igreja de Nossa Senhora da Assunção and the Nossa Senhora dos Navegantes.

    Cascais - Church Cascais - Church at Praha Reinha
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Cascais

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

26 travelers online now

Comments

Cascais Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Cascais local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Cascais sightseeing.

View all Cascais hotels