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Most Viewed Favorites in Lisbon

  • internet cafes

    by arasnosliw Updated Oct 6, 2004

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    Favorite thing: There's not a multitude of internet cafes in Lisbon, but the ones around Rossio and Restauradores are the most expensive and busiest. I went to a few in Bairro Alto that offer free internet with a purchase of a drink or food item on the menu. Costing only a few euros, I could satisfy my appetite and use the internet unlimitedly. What a deal!

    internet cafe in Lisbon

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  • a2lopes's Profile Photo

    Tourist Information desks

    by a2lopes Updated Mar 20, 2009

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    Favorite thing: You can find tourist information and buy the Lisbon Card (discount in museums and restaurants + free transports in the city) and taxi vouchers at the following points:

    Airport (arrivals) | Phone: +351 218 450 660
    winter/summer | 7am-12pm

    Palácio Foz, Praça dos Restauradores | Tel.: +351 213 463 314
    winter/summer | 9am-8pm

    Rua Augusta - kiosk | Tel.: +351 213 259 131
    winter/summer | 10am-1pm; 2pm-6pm

    Praça do Comércio | Phone: +351 210 312810
    winter/summer | 9am-8pm

    Train station of Santa Apolónia | Tel.: +351 218 821 606
    winter/summer | 8am-1pm (Tue – Sat)

    Rua do Arsenal, 25 | Tel.: +351 210 312820
    winter/summer | 10am-6pm

    Jerónimos Monastery (Belém) - kiosk | Tel.: +351 213 658 435
    winter/summer | 10am-1pm; 2pm-6pm (Tue – Sat)

    More info.

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  • patriotism

    by arasnosliw Written Jul 27, 2004

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    Fondest memory: I've come to realize that the Portuguese are very proud of their country. Many people criticize Americans for being very patriotic, but I feel as if it is even more so here. Sure, the 2004 EURO (hosted in Portugal) certainly tied the country together and gave them a sense of unity. Still, they know they are proud even if they don't want to admit it, and I respect them for that.

    there's a flag hanging from almost every window

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Chiado

    by sue_stone Written Jan 26, 2006

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    Favorite thing: On the edge of one of Lisbon's hills is the Chiado district, located between Baixa and Barrio Alto.

    This area is full of style. For starters, take a walk along Rua Garrett, which is lined with upmarket fashion shops, elegant cafes and jewellery stores. Browse in the Armazens do Chiado department store....even if it is just to use the toilets ; )

    Fondest memory: Pop into the landmark that is Cafe A Brasileira for a quick coffee and a sweet treat. Then take a wander to see the Teatro Nacional de Sao Carlos (Opera House), one of Lisbon's first neo-classical buildings. Also near by, if you have the time I hear that the Museu do Chiado is worth a look, though we didn't go in.

    We entered Chiado by two interesting methods - we rode the Elevador de Santa Justa up one time, and another we arrived on the number 28 tram. But really, it is just up the hill from Baixa, so easy to find.

    Nearest metro: Baixa Chiado

    Teatro Nacional de Sao Carlos Cafe A Brasileira beautiful buildings inside Armazens do Chiado
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Travel Guide

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Dec 2, 2004

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    Favorite thing: About 2 months before we left Canada for Portugal, I bought a DK Eyewitness Travel Guide book (for about US$30) in order to get some background information on this new (to me) country. After looking at Fodors and Lonely Planet as well, I picked DK because it is totally loaded with colour photographs, maps and helpful hints. It really made a huge difference to us to be able to see the various attractions and read the detailed descriptions of each one.

    The book even has various suggested tour routes with all the relevent details, such as the Serra de Sintra drive or even one near Evora to see ancient cromlechs! For Lisbon, it also provided us with detailed street maps of the different sections of the city as well as another entire chapter on the delights in the area immediately surrounding Lisbon. There are sections describing the time-line of Portugal's history, its various rulers down through the ages, local food customs and a whole wealth of information!

    It's useful restaurant phrases and a small Portugese/English phrase section all came in very handy! To get maximum enjoyment out of your trip, I strongly suggest that you get a guide book of any description to give you some understanding of the culture and attractions of the country that you are visiting!

    DK Eyewitness Travel Guide
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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Catch the number 28 Tram!

    by sue_stone Updated Jan 26, 2006

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    Favorite thing: A real tourist 'must do' in Lisbon is to take a ride on the Number 28 tram! This cute little yellow tram winds its way up and down Lisbon's hills...it is kind of an 'unofficial touirst tram'.

    Travelling from Largo Martim Moniz, it clanks its way up through the Alfama & Graca districts, before crossing through Baixa, climbing back up to Chiado and finishing at Campo Orique.

    Fondest memory: There are numerous stops along the way, and you can ride from beginning to end if you like for the small cost of around 1.20euro per ticket (or use your travel card)

    I would highly recommend a fun ride in the number 28. The timetable and stops are outlined on the website - http://www.carris.pt/en/horarios/e028_1.pdf

    No. 28 Tram on the tram
    Related to:
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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Baixa

    by sue_stone Written Jan 26, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Baixa runs from magnificent Rossio down to the huge Praca do Comercio. Possibly the true heart of Lisbon, Baixa was re-built after the 1755 earthquake in a grid systems of streets all dedicated to particular trades.

    These days most of these businesses have been replaced by tourist focused cafes, chain stores and leather shops, but you still come across the occasional gem, making a wander around Baixa's streets a must.

    Fondest memory: Pedestrianised Rua Augusta is the main tourist drag, and a great place for a stroll and a shop. It is lined with a selection of shopping options, with a particular slant towards leather goods shops, selling lots of handbags and shoes....paradise! There are also plenty of cafes to keep everyone satisfied.

    Take a wander off Rua Augusta and you may stumble across a surprise or two....live the Elevador de Santa Justa or a diet-breaking pastelaria.

    Nearest metro: Baixo Chiado or Rossio

    Teatro Nacional de Dona Maria II in Rossio Praca da Figueira Praca do Comercio Elevador de Santa Justa treats in the window on Rua Augusta
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Barrio Alto

    by sue_stone Written Jan 26, 2006

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    Favorite thing: The Barrio Alto is Lisbon's 'High Town', overlooking the Baixa and tempting you to explore its medieval alleyways.

    The narrow cobbled streets are lined with run down looking buildings which house numerous bars and restaurants - shabby looking on the outside, but hiding sleek interiors. This area is the heart of Lisbon's nightlife and was refreshingly deserted when we were here during the day.

    Fondest memory: Residents look out from balconies above the streets, with their washing strung overhead and their cats sitting in the windows sleepily watching the world go by.

    The fun way to enter this district is via a comical ride on the delightful Elevador da Gloria.

    Nearest Metro: Restauradores

    Barrio Alto streets beautiful Azulejos riding Elevador da Gloria up to Barrio Alto more gorgeous Azulejos in the district shady streets make for poor photos!
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Where to get money

    by ncfg Written Aug 28, 2004

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    Favorite thing: In Lisbon you will not have any trouble to find banks and ATM machines to take Euros, the currency used in Portugal.
    There are several Banks ( BES, BCP, GGD and others). On my pic you can see the huge building of Caixa Geral de Depositos (CGD) in Lisbon.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Jacaranda trees

    by toonsarah Written Jun 12, 2009

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    Fondest memory: Although I have been to Lisbon on two previous occasions, the most recent visit was my first in the Spring, and I was thrilled to discover another element to the city’s charms, its jacaranda trees. They were in full blossom, and their soft mauve haze seemed to drift above my head as I strolled the streets, or beneath my feet as I looked out from my hotel balcony. They were particularly eye-catching in the Largo do Carmo, set against the weathered grey stone of the ruined convent.

    This beautiful tree is more commonly seen in more tropical climates: South America, Africa, northern Australia and the southern states of the US. I have never seen them in any profusion in Europe but Lisbon’s sunny climate clearly suits them and they thrive here. Does anyone know if one would grow in England?!

    Jacaranda trees in the Largo do Carmo Jacaranda blossom Jacaranda tree View from my balcony

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Graffitti

    by toonsarah Updated Jun 12, 2009

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    Favorite thing: While graffiti can be rightly said to be a scourge of the city, you will find many examples which in my view demonstrate that the line between vandalism and art is very ill-defined. These examples were all photographed in the Bairro Alto on my recent visit, apart from the last which was taken in the Alfama some years ago. They are a million miles from the ugly tags and paint-sprayed scrawl of regular graffiti, and personally I think they enhance rather than mar the city’s streets. It would be good if the authorities might make the same distinction and clean up all the unsightly examples while retaining these little gems.

    Much of this graffiti is created with the use of stencils, and in doing some research I came across a website with some more interesting examples of this (as well as an older image of the picture of the artist covering himself with paint, photo 2, which shows it before later graffiti had partially defaced it).

    In the Bairro Alto In the Bairro Alto In the Bairro Alto In the Bairro Alto In the Alfama
    Related to:
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  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Lisbon is Located HERE

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Located about 2/3 of the way down Portugal's western Atlantic coastline, Lisbon is the bustling, yet amazingly friendly capital of Portugal. We had been advised to take our time while there, spend a few days enjoying the many things that the city has to offer before zooming off on our round-the-country trip!

    It was excellent advice! We really enjoyed our far too short time there (4 nights) and would love to have another go at the city!

    This map also shows our eventual route around Portugal, taking us an additional 9 days to complete (2500 km or 1600 miles). Please check out my 'Algarve' page to see how we made out with the first part of our road trip on the southern coast!

    Lisbon Location
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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Pattern underfoot

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Apr 25, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Distinctive black and white mosaics, known as Calçada, or Portuguese Pavement are a feature of the squares and pavements in Lisbon. It seems no two are the same, the patterns used complimenting the space they cover, whether an expansive square or a narrow footpath. Abstract, geometric, traditional and modern, flowers, stars, linear, swirling - there seems to be no limit to the variety or ingenuity of the designers.

    Whilst the technique dates back to Roman times, the black and white style favoured in Portugal was first introduced to the country in 1849 when the distinctive wave pattern pavement known as "the wide sea" was laid in Rossio Square in Lisbon - it's still there today. They're rather beautiful and, I should think, incredibly labour-intensive to lay.

    Watch your steps

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    A big problem

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated May 5, 2008

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    Favorite thing: There's just so much about Lisbon that is charming but, oh dear, do they have a problem with graffiti! It is everywhere - defacing beautiful old buildings, scrawled over the trams and elevadores, on shops and houses, windows and doors, worse in back streets but very few streets seem to escape the blight altogether. There are few places these days that don't have some problem with the wretched stuff but Lisbon's truly was one of the worst I've seen.

    A modern scourge

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  • mazzap's Profile Photo

    Look Up & Look Down

    by mazzap Updated Mar 19, 2006

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    Favorite thing: When walking around, don't forget to look up........& down too, but watch where you're going of course!

    The beautiful cobbled designs all over the streets & squares of Lisbon & surrounding towns really are eyecatching. Sadly, many of the footpaths that are made in this style are falling into disrepair. I should imagine it's an ongoing full-time job keeping them up to standard though.

    And of course, don't forget to look up & admire the ornate balconies and architecture around this city!

    This design gave a visually undulating effect! A nice home with a view! A beautiful design!
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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