Day trips: Sintra, Cascais, Alcochete..., Lisbon

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  • Day trips: Sintra, Cascais, Alcochete...
    by anaanes
  • Day trips: Sintra, Cascais, Alcochete...
    by anaanes
  • Regaleira Estate - House
    Regaleira Estate - House
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    Carcavelos

    by anaanes Written Apr 21, 2013

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    Spend a day on the beach in Carcavelos or just have a great lunch/dinner in one of the beach restaurants.
    It's also a good option to take some Surf / bodyboard lessons. There's plenty of Surf Schools on the beach. I recomend Angel's Surf School (contacts below).

    It's very easy to get to Carcavelos, just pick the train in Cais do Sodré.

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    • Surfing
    • Beaches

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    Capuchos Convent

    by anaanes Written Mar 20, 2013

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    Capuchos Convent, Sintra, Lisboa, Portugal
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    Officially named Mosteiro de Santa Cruz da Serra da Sintra, Capuchos Convent is a historical convent from the 16th century it embodies the ideal of fraternity and universal brotherhood inherent in the values of the Franciscan monks who lived there.
    Once there you can image how life was there. It's a very green an unique spot.

    How to get there: Pick the train to Sintra at the Rossio train station.

    About Sintra: Sintra is a fairytale village: very beautiful with its own legends and small details.
    There's a lot of beautiful palaces to see there like Pena Palace, Monserrate Palace, Moorish Castle, Capuchos Convent, Regaleira Estate, Royal Palace, etc.

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    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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    Pena Palace

    by anaanes Updated Mar 20, 2013
    Pena Palace, Sintra, Lisboa, Portugal
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    Pena Palace was the first romantic palace built in Europe. Is a very colorfull palace with an amazing sightseing and a big garden witch hides lots os details (bridges, pergolas, fountains, etc)!
    On 7th July 2007 it was selectd as one of the seven wonders of Portugal. You can't miss it!

    How to get there: Pick the train to Sintra in the Rossio Station

    My suggestion of day trip:
    Pick the train to Sintra in ther middle of the morning. Geting there go have your lunch on Apeadeiro (restaurant near the train station).
    After lunch go to the village center and to Piriquita (local business) to buy a Travesseiro and a Queijadinha (and a bottle of water! this treats are really sweet!).
    Sit down in the stair of Sintra Palace and enjoy your dessert!
    In the village center look for the bus to Chalet condessa d'Edla, nuy your tickets and start visiting the chalet, then go to Pena Palace ant at last to Moorish Castle.
    In an afternoon you can see the 3 places becaise they're near each other.
    At the end of the day go back to Lisbon an relax a while in your hotel room.
    The go to the downtown to dinner and enjoy the sightseeing on Lost In restaurant bar.

    About Sintra: Sintra is a fairytale village: very beautiful with its own legends and small details.
    There's a lot of beautiful palaces to see there like Pena Palace, Monserrate Palace, Moorish Castle, Capuchos Convent, Regaleira Estate, Royal Palace, etc.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Regaleira Estate

    by anaanes Updated Mar 20, 2013

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    Regaleira Estate - Initiation Well
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    Is the most amazing garden I ever seen!
    I don't know why the turism in Portugal keep skiping it from the tourist guides. This place is an UNESCO World Heritage!
    This garden has a lot of details like benches, fountains, caves and an enigmatic system of tunnels. Their symbolism has been interpreted like a espiritual path between light and darkness.
    There's a lot of mythologic representations here, specially to the mythologic Greek God Pan.

    How to get there: Pick the train to Sintra in the Rossio Station

    My suggestion of a day trip:
    Get there by the morning an visit Sintra Palace. Then have lunch on Apeadeiro Reataurant but don't ask for desset. Go back to the village center and go to Piriquita buy a Travesseiro and a Queijadinha (and a bottle of water! this treats are really sweet!).
    Sit down in the stair of Sintra Palace and enjoy your dessert!
    Take the walk to Regaleira Estate, and spend there the afternoon.
    Take the train back to Lisbon and relax a litle in you hotel room.
    Go have dinner on Terreiro do Paço and then walk to Cais do Sodré and visit Pensão Amor.

    About Sintra: Sintra is a fairytale village: very beautiful with its own legends and small details.
    There's a lot of beautiful palaces to see there like Pena Palace, Monserrate Palace, Moorish Castle, Capuchos Convent, Regaleira Estate, Royal Palace, etc.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Estoril

    by solopes Updated Feb 1, 2013

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    Estoril - Portugal

    Mandatory for anyone spending more than two days in Lisbon, a trip along the coast until Cascais allows you to see some beautiful beaches lined with classical palaces and modern villas. Estoril joins the best of the several beaches with the Casino that now has got some competition in Lisbon but keeps being a highlight in Lisbon's coast.

    It's also commonly planned a trip to Sintra and/or Ericeira starting or ending in Estoril's coast. In my opinion, "ending" will be the best solution, because most of night animation may be found in this area.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Architecture

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  • Ines_'s Profile Photo

    Daytrip: Sintra

    by Ines_ Written Jan 31, 2013

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    Sintra is Portugal’s fairytale place. It is beautiful, has lots of legends, it’s the perfect place for romance and has some of the most amazing constructions of the country. Sintra is a small village close to Lisbon that you can reach by train in 40 minutes.

    The reason why Sintra is most famous for is Palácio da Pena, but there are other places you should definitely visit: Monserrate, Capucho’s Convent, Regaleira’s Farm, Castelo dos Mouros and the village itself. Don’t forget to try Sitra’s traditional sweets!

    There is still a great part of unspoiled nature in Sintra and places with amazing views that you can discover by yourself if you go by car.

    My Sintra Page
    Sinta's Parks

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    Daytrip: Cascais

    by Ines_ Written Jan 31, 2013

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    Cascais is a village close to Lisbon with much to offer to its visitors. Lying close to the Atlantic Ocean there are plenty of beaches to enjoy and also museums, restaurants, gardens and natural landscapes to enjoy.

    The most well-known museum is Paula Rego’s House of Stories, one of our most famous painters. Even if you don’t like painting the museum from the outside is still worth a look.
    I think the best thing to do in Cascais is just walk around, see the village, walk in the beaches and the marine and visit the forth where inside you’ll find a small town, recently renewed with nice stores.

    Not so close from the center you have Boca do Inferno (Hell’s mouth) a rocky place to appreciate the sea and a beautiful sunsets. At last, and I think this beach is just for people who have car, Guincho’s beach: one of the most beautiful beaches in Portugal and very well known specially for sports. It is specially good in low season.

    To get to Cascais from Lisbon catch a train from Cais do Sodré. It's 30/40 minuts and the prices are inexpensive.

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    Sintra and Palácio da Pena

    by AlPhilip Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you ever come to Lisbon you must go to Sintra. It's an amazing place, far from all the city problems, where you can relax in its marvelous nature, stroll around the beautiful and historic city center, or visit Palacio da Pena.

    Palacio da Pena is the most complete and notable example of Portuguese architecture in the Romantic period. It stands on one of the rocky peaks of the Serra de Sintra, and blends in a surprisingly fortunate manner with its natural background of greenery and crags, testifying to the aesthetic potentialities of the project.

    The Palace dates back to 1839, when the King Consort Dom Fernando II bought the ruins of the Hieronymite Monastery of Nossa Senhora da Pena and started to adapt it for use as a residence, according to his Romantic taste. It has astonishing views of the nearby city of Cascais.

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    Sintra

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 8, 2010

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    Sintra as viewed from the Moorish Castle
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    Sintra lies about 30km (18 miles) from the centre of Lisbon and is many Royal Palaces, used by generations of Portuguese royalty prior to the 1910 revolution. The surrounding hills are surmounted by the remains of a Moorish Castle and by the nineteenth-century Pena Palace, all of which have made it a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    Its history dates back to at least the 8th or 9th century when the Moors built the Castelo dos Mouros (or simply, Moorish Castle) which overlooks down on the town and surrounding countryside. King Afonso Henriques recaptured the town in 1147 and promoted the development of the region by granting a foral (letter of feudal rights) to the inhabitants of Sintra and its castle in 1154. The decline of the castle began in the 15th century, when most of the population settled downhill, in today's old quarter of Sintra. It was around this time that the Sintra National Palace, said to be the best preserved medieval Royal Palace in Portugal, was built in the centre of the old town, making it the highlight tourist attraction in Sintra town itself. The mixture of Gothic, Manueline and Moorish styles in the present palace is, however, mainly the result of building campaigns in the 15th and early 16th centuries. More palaces were built in the surrounding hills which add to Sintra's rather touristy feel.

    The best way to get to Sintra is by taking the train from Lisbon's Rossio station. This is how I got here and tickets only cost €4 return plus trains leave every 10 minutes or so and take about 40 minutes. Once here, the best way of getting around all the sites, which are fairly spread out from one another, is to take the circular 434 bus. Tickets are only €4.60 for the whole day and can be purchased from the bus driver. If you choose to walk be warned that the trek to the Pena Palace and the Castelo dos Mouros can be a daunting, steep up-hill, one-hour climb from the city centre.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    A day in Cascais

    by toonsarah Updated Jun 23, 2009

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    A back street in Cascais
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    If you fancy a change from the busy streets and noise of the city, why not take a day trip to Cascais? Only just over 30 minutes away by train, this little town has plenty to offer. There is an appealing blend of authentic local life and tourist-focused facilities. Fishing boats bob in the harbour just offshore from the town beach, locals shop or chat in doorways in the winding back lanes just a stone’s throw from the busy restaurants in Luís de Camões Square, traditional houses decorated with azulejos panels sit almost side by side with fashionable shops.

    Spend your day strolling those same back lanes, following the path beside the sea to the rocky scenery of the Boca do Inferno, eating ice cream at the historic Santini gelataria or freshly caught fish and seafood in the open-air restaurants, browsing the shops or simply relaxing on the beach or in a friendly bar. There are no major sights, apart from the afore-mentioned Boca do Inferno and a citadel currently (May 2009) being restored to be opened up to the public, so there is no pressure to pack a lot into your day. And even the train ride itself is a delight, especially if you sit on the left hand side (on the outward journey) to make the most of the sea views.

    There is much more information about Cascais on my separate page about the town.

    Directions Trains run regularly from Cais do Sodre station, a few minutes' walk west of the Praça do Comércio, and the journey time averages 35 minutes

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    A day in Sintra

    by toonsarah Written Jun 12, 2009

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    View of Sintra
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    In contrast to Cascais, Sintra is packed with sights, and in a day you can only sample a few of them, especially if it as hot when you visit as it was when we were there. But I gather such temperatures are rare, and a trip to the hills of Sintra could be a great way to escape the city heat. My one day there has certainly given me a strong liking for the town and I would love to return to see more of its delights.

    Sintra is home to no fewer than three national palaces: the Palácio da Vila, or Palácio Real (Royal Palace), the Palácio da Pena and the Palácio de Queluz. There are also two other palaces of note, the Monserrate Palace and Quinta da Regaleira, as well as a Moorish castle perched on top of a hill. The town itself, though rather touristy, has plenty of charm, as well as all the facilities you need for a day trip or longer stay.

    The town has been the favoured home of royalty and nobility since the 13th century, although its history goes back even further to the founding of the Moorish castle several hundred years before that. It flourished especially during the 14th to 16th centuries, when the Royal Palace was several times expanded and elaborated upon, and was then rediscovered by the Romantics, including Lord Byron, in the early 19th century and given a new lease of life. It is not difficult to see why it appealed to them, as this mix of somewhat wild countryside and romantic architecture matched their ideals of beauty perfectly. Their enthusiastic admiration of its virtues led to further, sympathetic, development including the forestation of the Serra de Sintra and the construction of sumptuous revivalist buildings such as the Palácio da Pena.

    Today’s Sintra continues this tradition of romance, and if this sort of landscape appeals to you I can really recommend a visit to the gardens of the Quinta da Regaleira in particular. There is more about this, and my all too brief visit to Sintra, on my separate page (to follow) about the town.

    Directions Catch a train from Rossio Station in the heart of Lisbon. The journey takes about 30 minutes, and Sintra’s station is only a short walk from the centre. Once there you’ll need taxis, or horse-drawn carriages, to get to some of the further-flung sights.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Natural Park of Arrabida

    by J_Antunes Updated Dec 6, 2008

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    Although terribly spoiled by a nearby cement factory and some quarries it is still a must. It is composed by a big and lusty mountain, covered with primitive vegetation, woods and lovely beaches. The park itself has almos 11.000 acres and the highest point has 380 meters.

    Its biggest architecture highlight is probably the Arrábida Convent wrapped up in a pious legend. It began in 1215, when the english merchant Haidebrant brought in his ship an image of Our Lady with Jesus infant, carved in stone and retired from the chapel of a Benidictine Convent. The image disappeared during a storm in portuguese waters and with Lisbon at sight. However, the ship succeded in turning the Espichel Cape, and arriving finally to Alpertuche, were the sea was peaceful. The sailor, resting from the storm, sighted an intense light in the top of the Arrabida Mountain, which he climbed up amid the thicket. He soon found the miraculous image. He then sold all his possessions and ordered the construction of a chapel, where he proposed himself to live alone. Some decades past, the Duke of Aveiro, D. João de Lencastre, asked the Superior General of the Franciscan Order to send a small community of friars to live in the Arrabida retreat. The duke, visiting Guadalupe, contacted an important spanish nobleman, to whom he explained his idea. This nobleman was to come the famous Friar Martinho de Santa Maria, after having founded the Arrabida Convent. The invitation was so accepted, and the recovering of the built areas (with the Memory Chapel) was studied afterwards, together with the utilization of the surrounding grounds. The New Convent is located in the hillside, its whiteness animating the prevailing green.

    About 1.5 kilometers of the convent complex, we can see the small chapel of Bom Jesus. This temple presents a singular architecture and decoration. The reasons and the sense of this building are frequently object of varied interpretations. The octagonal form of the chapel and of the altar is one of the controversial matters. The building of the chapel was ordered by D. Álvaro de Lencastre in the 14th century, and the author of its plan was the friar Afonso da Piedade.

    There are several stone figures - today very mutilated - that flank the access to the temple yard. The chapel is topped by an arched roof, with a minaret and glassed tiles covering. The four doors that opened to the celebrations area are located in the superior floor, to where lead two flights of steps. The altar is quadrangular, of artistic design and good carving, formerly gilt, and tradition says that here have been simultaneously celebrated four masses. A great tabernacle, also with four porticos, holds within a smaller one, where there was an image of a small Jesus infant.

    The nearby town of Azeitão is also a must. It is full of nice palaces and churches, many visitable wine cellars (with the renowned moscatel wine), fountains, a museum of a local poet, the typical cheeses and wonderful local sweets. You can see more in the guide http://www.azeitao.net/azeitao/guia_AZEITAO.pdf (only in Portuguese but you can see the images).

    The beaches are wonderful, although some get to the shade of the mountain at the end of the afternoon. The most known one is Portinho da Arrabida. A ver small and nice town by the sea with small hotels and a small XVI century fortress today transformed in museum dedicated to the oceans. It is open from Thuesday to Saturday from 10h-16h and at Saturdays from 15:00-18:00.

    Arrábida waters are excellent to dive. Companies such as the diving centre of Portinho da Arrábida offer this activity (Phone 212183656 or 917503669). Sal (http://www.sal.pt/) does also many activities in the park such as hiking, boat trips, trips to see the dolphins, etc...

    In the direction of Setúbal there are some fortresses and the Pousada of São Filipe with a wonderful view over the Sado River and sea.

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    Watching the birds fly...

    by J_Antunes Updated Nov 8, 2008

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    Foto of Flamingos (copyright Rosa Gamboias)

    Lisbon is surrounded by some natural reservations. The natural park of Sintra-Cascais, the Natural Reservation of the Tagus Estuary, the Natural Reservation of the Sado Estuary, the Fossil Cliffs of Caparica and the Arrábida National Park.

    The first one I'll like to talk about is the Tejo Estuary Natural Reservation. It is one of the most important natural reservation in Europe and the biggest wetland in Portugal. There are more than 194 regular species of birds passing through this area, salt production areas and old canals.

    How to visit it?
    Alcochete city hall (town in the south bank of Tagus near the Vasco da Gama Bridge) has a boat (Alcatejo, a typical boat) travelling through the Tagus. A normal ticket costs 5,50€ (you can contact the tourist office of Alcochete +351 21 234 86 55 or e-mail them posto.turismo@cm-alcochete.pt).
    Vila Franca de Xira city hall has also a boat that does tours in the river. It is a traditional boat from that village fully restored. Trips are held from May to November and you can contact them through the phone number +351 263 285600, +351 263 285 605 (Tourist Office), +351 969 022 529 (cell phone); Fax: 263 271516 or E-mail: turismo@cm-vfxira.pt.
    Tours for You is a tourist operator that does tours with experts on bird watching in several natural reservations. You can see more details in http://www.toursforyou.pt/Eng/Portugal/birdtagus.htm.
    SPEA, a non profitable association of bird watching, does throughout the year, many field trips to watch the birds in several places of the country and many of them in the Tejo Estuary. Contact them through (www.spea.pt or spea@spea.pt).
    Birds and Nature Tours is another tourist operator that does tours in the Tejo Estuary to see the wildlife (http://www.birds.pt/indexen.html). Besides the tours they also offer courses on birds identification. The tour depends on the number of people going, but the 80€/half day is as expensive as it can get.
    Transtroia does many cruises along the Tagus departing from the city of Lisbon. There are routes to see the birds, others for fishing, others just to see the city. (transtroia.com, phones(+351) 218 952 046, (+351) 213 712 205, (+351) 213 830 266, (+351) 935 375 805 e-mail: transtroia@mail.telepac.pt).

    There is also available a pedestrial walk starting in Alcochete town and automobile routes (check in Alcochete tourist office, in Largo da Misericórdia or the Natural Park Headquarters in Av. Combatentes da Grande Guerra,1, ALCOCHETE, Phone: 21 2341742).

    The best time to visit is between Spring and Summer when there are more birds to see.

    Take time and fly with the birds!

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

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    daytrip to cascais.

    by cachaseiro Written Sep 7, 2008

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    cascais
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    a visit to cascais is a very good thing when you have been to lisbon for a few days and need to breathe a little again after wonderful and chaotic lisbon.
    cascais is a small seaside town in the outskirts of lisbon and a bit of a fancy place these days, but the place still has a lot of original charm too.
    there is a nice beach there, s if you are lisbon and feel like a day on the beach, then cascais is not a bad choice.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel

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    Cabo da Roca

    by woodstockties Written Feb 9, 2008

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    magnificent view on the cliffs and ocean
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    Cabo da Roca is the most western point of the European continent.
    At the cape stands a watchtower and a monument with geographical data and a text from Camões:
    Onde a terra acaba e o mar começa (the place where the land ends and the sea begins).
    There's also a restaurant where you can buy a certificate to prove you've been there.
    Along the cliffs you can walk splendid. The view over the rough ocean is breathtaking.
    Cabo da Roca is situated about 30 km west of Lisbon.
    The busline between Sintra and Cascais stops here every hour.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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