Markets, Lisbon

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  • Mercado da Ribeira
    Mercado da Ribeira
    by HORSCHECK
  • Mercado da Ribeira
    Mercado da Ribeira
    by HORSCHECK
  • Feira da Ladra market
    Feira da Ladra market
    by HORSCHECK
  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Along the Aisles: Bakery Sellers in Mercado

    by painterdave Written Jan 6, 2013
    Assortment Of Breads On Display
    2 more images

    In the middle of Mercado Alvalade Norte are numerous bakeries. The photos below show some of their specialties. These photos were taken from three different bakery sellers. Each one had something quite different from the other, and because we were there during a holiday season we found some interesting things on their shelf.

    What to buy: The bread in Portugal, to me, is similar to Tuscan bread, but it has salt added. The crust is similar and the texture inside is the same.
    Interesting to note that in restaurants they charge you for the bread, unlike restaurants in Italy, where you can actually ask for more at no charge.

    What to pay: This mercado is not expensive, except for the lobster and crab. So expect the bread to be less expensive that in a grocery type store, or where you shop at home.

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    • Women's Travel

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  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Mercado Alvalade Norte Bakeries: Bakery Specialties

    by painterdave Written Jan 6, 2013
    The Way In To Bakery Heaven
    1 more image

    Inside the Mercado are many bakeries. If you want juicy, sugar bakery items, choose the shop near the back entrance. This review is about that one, but I will also write another tip about the others located in the aisle ways.
    The back entrance shop is small but packs a wallop on your taste buds. Lots of Portuguese baked goods sit in two windows of the counter and beg to be tried. I particularly liked the multi layered rectangular pastry with what looked like a maple frosting on top. This was not maple, but was still mouth watering. These goodies will last until breakfast, which was why we bought them.
    The ladies who work the shop do not speak English, so we ended up pointing. This worked and everyone was smiling at the end. They got my cash, and I got something tasty.
    They also have baguette type breads, of which they have many types. We bought one for later, and it kept well.

    What to buy: White frosting covered, rectangular pastry......

    What to pay: Not expensive here

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  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Markets: Mercado Alvalade Norte

    by painterdave Written Jan 5, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Front of Market
    4 more images

    The Mercado Alvalade Norte was featured by Anthony Bourdain in his food show to Lisbon, and so we figured that it would be a good market to visit. Finding it farther from the center we took the metro to the station of the same name. It is about a 7 minute walk, but worth the time. It is a large market featuring all types of foods from fish to nuts. There are also some clothing sellers and several bakeries.
    If you leave from the front turn right and walk one block where you will find an awesome old coffee/tea shop. This is worth a visit.

    The market is open Mon-Sat from 7am until 7pm, saturdays has an earlier closing time.

    What to buy: Live Crab, Lobster and shell fish
    Bakery Goods

    What to pay: Prices are inexpensive
    no haggling

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    • Food and Dining
    • Family Travel

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  • deeper_blue's Profile Photo

    Markets: Thieves market

    by deeper_blue Written Nov 27, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Feira da Ladra or thieves market is in the Alfama district very close to the National Pantheon. It takes place on Tuesdays and Saturdays. There are all manner of souvenirs for sale from books and CDs to old coins and antiques. Don't forget to haggle.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Markets: Flea Market

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 6, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Lisbon's flea market is called locally the Feira da Ladra or "Thieves’ Market" (in the original Portuguese, it is a woman thief!). A market of this type is thought to have been in place in Lisbon since the 12th Century and the name Feira da Ladra was first mentioned in the 17th Century. Located just to the north of the Panteão de Santa Engrácia (National Pantheon) and the Igreja de São Vicente de Fora in Alfama, the market takes place twice a week on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The stalls sell mostly bric-a-brac ranging from the usual touristy stuff, to clothes, toys and antiques. There are a couple of interesting stalls with prints of old maps, old postcards and photos. It’s worth having a rummage around and remember to haggle!

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  • Turska's Profile Photo

    Markets: Feira da ladra

    by Turska Updated Mar 21, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Traditional "fleamarket".
    Even if the name means thiefs market,they say it´s all legal now.Tell you the truth,we didn´t think it´s all true..Some brand new clothes were strange cheap,and so were the cd´s and PS3-games,too.At least those were pirate-ones.
    But there is many interesting things also.Like some artisans,selling their handgrafts.And there might be some interesting things for antique-lovers,if you are lucky.

    It´s open every tuesday and saturday,and it´s starting from other streets before the "real" area.And it´s open until dark.At least they say so-we went at noon,so can´t say for sure.We didn´t see any thieves,but like at many other fleamarkets-you should take care of your wallet and other staff.

    What to buy: What ever ;)

    What to pay: Mostly the staff was very cheap,but some new things were more expensive than at other places.

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  • SOLODANCER's Profile Photo

    Lisbon's neighborhood mini-mercados: The little groceries of convenience

    by SOLODANCER Updated Dec 24, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A late nite mini-mercado in Bairro Alto

    Where to go quickly upon arrival for the basics as bottled water, a soap and shampoo you have overlooked to pack in your luggage, even a cup of fresh coffee and also a sandwich to nourish you of a practical meal in your late-night arrival when restaurants and the supermarket nearby already shut closed for the evening.

    This is a common scenario for so many of us in many trips arriving at our destination very early or mostly quite late already in the given normal business hours. And you ponder nervously where you might be able to obtain that necessary item of bottled water that is crucial to one's thirst at least thru the night into morning without resorting to go for the unknown local tap water with unexpected dire consequences. Of course this particular scenario can happen mostly to travellers on a budget travelling under odd flight schedule combinations and lodging at bed-and-breakfast inns or low-cost hotels rather than priced-hotels where can be found easy access to comforts at any time.

    One European city wherein one would never have to fear so much as being stranded from lack of the basic necessities at mostly any given time is Lisbon. The city is blessed with tons of neighborhood family-owned little stores called 'mini-mercados' in every street practically, convenient stores with very late closing hours selling the necessities from fruits and vegetables, food items and cold cuts, bottled water and wine, personal hygiene items, even a cup of fresh coffee. These are type of small stores just in the next street or around the corner from one's hotel which the concierge at your hotel will be glad enough to direct you to.

    The best thing I find about these mini-mercados in Lisbon is that there's always the entire family if not expectedly the presence of a matriarch running the store and ready to help you with your needs who very often inevitably will strike up a warm welcome which progresses into a wonderful exchange of common courtesies running off many a times into a good initial conversation which is a fantastic introduction to local ways and knowledge at one's command or exercise of the native language.

    What to pay: The prices at these mini-mercados tend to be always cheaper than the big supermarket chains.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Markets: Feira da Ladra

    by toonsarah Written Jun 12, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Engracia Church and market stalls
    2 more images

    This is Lisbon's Flea Market, or to translate the Portuguese accurately, “Thieves’ Market”. It is held every Tuesday and Saturday in the shadows of the Santa Engracia Church, or National Pantheon. CDs, books, clothes, stamps, coins, military objects, antiques, furniture, crafts and plain old junk can all be found, either on the various stalls or spread on blankets on the ground. You may just find a bargain, although for me a visit here is more about soaking up local colour and taking photographs than it is about shopping.

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  • halikowski's Profile Photo

    Markets: Praca de Espanha market

    by halikowski Written Apr 12, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You have to cross a bloody busy multi-lane traffic junction to get here, but if you do you find a nice little market. I bought some canvas sports pumps - good quality and nicely made - for just 10 euros.
    Besides shoes you can find household goods, tourist bric a brac, and one or two food stalls.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Feira da Ladra market

    by HORSCHECK Updated Nov 19, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Feira da Ladra market
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    The Feira da Ladra Market (Thieves Market) is Lisbon's most famous flea market. It takes place every Tuesday and Saturday from 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.

    The market is packed with all sorts of bric-a-brac from second hand clothes, used household goods, old records to wooden animals from the former Portuguese colonies. If you take your time you will find almost everything here.

    Directions:
    The Feira da Ladra Market is located at the Campo de Santa Clara in the Alfama district. Take tram #28 and get off near the Sao Vicente de Fora Church. The market is situated
    just behind the Church.

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  • Birsen's Profile Photo

    Street vendors: Feria da Ladra - Thieves' Market

    by Birsen Updated Oct 3, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Feria da ladra

    The stalls of the so-called "Thieves' Market" have occupied this site on the edge of the Alfama for over a century, laid out under the shade of trees or canopies. As the fame of this flea marketha grown, bargains are increasingly hard to find almost the mass of bric-a -brack, but a few of the vendors interesting wrought-iron work, prints and tile, as well as second hand clothes.

    open every Tuesday and Saturday 7:30 am - 1 pm

    What to buy: Tiles, ceramics, books, collectibles

    What to pay: Tiles, ceramics 1€ up to 50€ or more...

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  • PALLINA's Profile Photo

    Feira de Ladra: the best flea market in Lisbon

    by PALLINA Written Aug 27, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the Alfama, this is the best flea markets of Lisbon. You can find everything and when I write everything I really mean it (azulejos, clothes, CDs, books, pottery, second hand car tires, skateboards, condoms stored under the sunlight…) The atmosphere is great and justifies the visit, especially if you like to take photos to people (pay attention, not everybody like it!). I disliked the 80% of the goods to be sold but the remaining 20% was amazingly strange and cheap. Bargaining with sellers (in a very strange language like English-Italian-Spanish) was also very funny.

    What to buy: Second hand goods

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Markets: Mercado da Ribeira

    by barryg23 Written Oct 28, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mercado da Ribeira
    1 more image

    Mercado da Ribeira is the most famous market in Lisbon and it has been in the same spot since the 1930s in a building opposite Cais do Sodre station. We visited relatively late in the day at lunchtime so there was little left other than the fruit stalls. There is a nice buffet restaurant upstairs where you can get a huge meal for about 6 Euro.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Mercado da Ribeira

    by HORSCHECK Written Jul 15, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mercado da Ribeira
    1 more image

    The Mercado da Riberira is Lisbon's most popular food and fish market. It exists since the end of the 19th century, although the current market hall dates from 1930. On the ground level is an unbelievable selection of fish, seafood, meat, vegetables, fruits and flowers on offer. The upper level is home to a sort of centre for regional art and gastronomy.It also provide nice views down to the market stalls.
    The Mercado da Ribeira is opened daily from 7:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m.; except Sundays.

    Directions:
    The Mercado da Ribeira is located just across the street from the Cais Sodre train station You can get there by Metro (station "Cais Sodre", green line) or with tram #15.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Mercado da Ribeira: Mercado da Ribeira

    by sue_stone Written Jan 26, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    beautiful tiles inside the lobby of the building
    2 more images

    If find yourself down by the Cais do Sodre train station, look across the road and you will see the Mercado da Ribeira. This is a large market, topped with a Moorish-style dome.

    The cities main food market is open from 6am, selling everything from inky octopus and fresh seafood to fabulous fruit and vegies. On Sunday mornings there is a Collectors fair.

    The 2nd floor of the market has been converted into a touristy 'cultural centre' and it sells locally produced items such as port and honey, and also sells handicrafts.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

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