Azulejos (tiles), Lisbon

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  • Azulejos (tiles)
    by J_Antunes
  • Azulejos (tiles)
    by Oleg_D.
  • Azulejos (tiles)
    by Oleg_D.
  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    National Tile Museum, part V.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 10, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oooooh!!!!
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    That wonderful museum is billeted in the building of former Convent of the God Mother. The Convent was founded in 1509 by the Dowager Queen Eleanor (1458-1525) and she was the widow of the King Joao II. That’s why monastery although not luxurious but decorated in the Munuelino style so typical for the Portuguese Architecture of the first quarter of XVI century. That museum tell’s you the story of traditional Iberian art of decorative tiles. It typical Moorish art was firstly adopted and developed by the artisans of Christian Kingdoms. Then typical national schools appeared. This museum makes you familiar to the Portuguese Azulejo Art. You can see the oldest examples of those tiles made in XV-th century. You can learn the technology and even think about to open your own workshop! That place is worth to visit and I can insist that nobody can understand Portuguese culture without at least basic notion about the art of azulejo! Azulejos are everywhere in Portugal and they make our life more beautiful!
    There is church in the Convent and it survived the earthquake of 1755. Church decorated with giant azulejos panels.

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    National Tile Museum, part IV (Church)

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 8, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    That wonderful museum is billeted in the building of former Convent of the God Mother. The Convent was founded in 1509 by the Dowager Queen Eleanor (1458-1525) and she was the widow of the King Joao II. That’s why monastery although not luxurious but decorated in the Munuelino style so typical for the Portuguese Architecture of the first quarter of XVI century. That museum tell’s you the story of traditional Iberian art of decorative tiles. It typical Moorish art was firstly adopted and developed by the artisans of Christian Kingdoms. Then typical national schools appeared. This museum makes you familiar to the Portuguese Azulejo Art. You can see the oldest examples of those tiles made in XV-th century. You can learn the technology and even think about to open your own workshop! That place is worth to visit and I can insist that nobody can understand Portuguese culture without at least basic notion about the art of azulejo! Azulejos are everywhere in Portugal and they make our life more beautiful!
    There is church in the Convent and it survived the earthquake of 1755. Church decorated with giant azulejos panels.

    Opening Hours:
    Tuesday to Sunday from 10h am to 18h pm. Last entry at 17h30 pm.
    Closed: Mondays, Easter Sunday and the holidays: New Year’s Day, May 1 and Christmas Day.
    Fee:
    Normal ticket: 5 €

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    National Tile Museum, part III.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 8, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    That wonderful museum is billeted in the building of former Convent of the God Mother. The Convent was founded in 1509 by the Dowager Queen Eleanor (1458-1525) and she was the widow of the King Joao II. That’s why monastery although not luxurious but decorated in the Munuelino style so typical for the Portuguese Architecture of the first quarter of XVI century. That museum tell’s you the story of traditional Iberian art of decorative tiles. It typical Moorish art was firstly adopted and developed by the artisans of Christian Kingdoms. Then typical national schools appeared. This museum makes you familiar to the Portuguese Azulejo Art. You can see the oldest examples of those tiles made in XV-th century. You can learn the technology and even think about to open your own workshop! That place is worth to visit and I can insist that nobody can understand Portuguese culture without at least basic notion about the art of azulejo! Azulejos are everywhere in Portugal and they make our life more beautiful!

    Opening Hours:
    Tuesday to Sunday from 10h am to 18h pm. Last entry at 17h30 pm.
    Closed: Mondays, Easter Sunday and the holidays: New Year’s Day, May 1 and Christmas Day.
    Fee:
    Normal ticket: 5 €

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    National Tile Museum, part II.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 8, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    That wonderful museum is billeted in the building of former Convent of the God Mother. The Convent was founded in 1509 by the Dowager Queen Eleanor (1458-1525) and she was the widow of the King Joao II. That’s why monastery although not luxurious but decorated in the Munuelino style so typical for the Portuguese Architecture of the first quarter of XVI century. That museum tell’s you the story of traditional Iberian art of decorative tiles. It typical Moorish art was firstly adopted and developed by the artisans of Christian Kingdoms. Then typical national schools appeared. This museum makes you familiar to the Portuguese Azulejo Art. You can see the oldest examples of those tiles made in XV-th century. You can learn the technology and even think about to open your own workshop! That place is worth to visit and I can insist that nobody can understand Portuguese culture without at least basic notion about the art of azulejo! Azulejos are everywhere in Portugal and they make our life more beautiful!

    Opening Hours:
    Tuesday to Sunday from 10h am to 18h pm. Last entry at 17h30 pm.
    Closed: Mondays, Easter Sunday and the holidays: New Year’s Day, May 1 and Christmas Day.
    Fee:
    Normal ticket: 5 €

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    National Tile Museum.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 8, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    That wonderful museum is billeted in the building of former Convent of the God Mother. The Convent was founded in 1509 by the Dowager Queen Eleanor (1458-1525) and she was the widow of the King Joao II. That’s why monastery although not luxurious but decorated in the Munuelino style so typical for the Portuguese Architecture of the first quarter of XVI century. That museum tell’s you the story of traditional Iberian art of decorative tiles. It typical Moorish art was firstly adopted and developed by the artisans of Christian Kingdoms. Then typical national schools appeared. This museum makes you familiar to the Portuguese Azulejo Art. You can see the oldest examples of those tiles made in XV-th century. You can learn the technology and even think about to open your own workshop! That place is worth to visit and I can insist that nobody can understand Portuguese culture without at least basic notion about the art of azulejo! Azulejos are everywhere in Portugal and they make our life more beautiful!

    Opening Hours:
    Tuesday to Sunday from 10h am to 18h pm. Last entry at 17h30 pm.
    Closed: Mondays, Easter Sunday and the holidays: New Year’s Day, May 1 and Christmas Day.
    Fee:
    Normal ticket: 5 €

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    • Arts and Culture
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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Museu Nacional do Azulejo (Tile Museum)

    by Martin_S. Written Nov 3, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museu Nacional do Azulejo, Lisbon, Portugal
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    Tiles, especially in the color blue are a way of life in Portugal, you will see them everywhere. Used as decorations for everything, from the walls of staircases, to the lintel above a door or even the kitchen sink, they enter every level of life here. Hence the Tile Museum.
    They have some excellent displays that explain also the making of the tiles themselves as well as the colors used. In addition they have taken the musuem one step further, they have made excellent use of BRAILLE so that those who cannot see, CAN, in at least a small way enjoy the vibrance of the Portugese tiles.
    You can find a nice pamphlet on the museum at:
    http://www.turismodeportugal.pt/PORTUGU%8AS/AREASACTIVIDADE/PRODUTOSEDESTINOS/Documents/15%20-%20Museu%20do%20Azulejo.pdf

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  • veigapaula's Profile Photo

    Museu do Azulejo - Tile Museum

    by veigapaula Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museu do Azulejo
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    1509
    Queen Leonor founds the Madre de Deus convent, occupied by Discalced Franciscans from the first rule of St. Clare.
    The convent, which also belonged to the queen’s household, subsequently underwent magnificent architectural and luxurious decorative programmes. It owned an outstanding legacy of jewellery and works of art that was assembled over several centuries.
    The ground floor of the Claustrim and the Queen Leonor Chapel (or Arabic Room) date from the foundation of the convent.
    1551
    King João III orders the start of a construction programme supervised by royal architect Diogo de Torralva.
    C. 1698
    Decoration work on the nave in the church. Dutch painter Willem van der Kloet was commissioned to produce tile panels.
    1746-1759
    Major construction work is carried out during the reigns of King João V and King José, financed by the gold brought from Brazil. They were covered in gilded carvings, tiles, paintings, polychrome marbles and exotic woods, turning the convent into one of the most exuberantly Baroque buildings in Portugal.
    1746-1750
    Construction of the new sacristy in the church.
    1834
    Suppression of the religious orders in Portugal.
    1867
    The building is acquired by the state and annexed to the Maria Pia Sanatorium, when Church property is sold off.
    1871
    Definitive closure of the convent after the death of the last nun.
    1872
    The start of construction work at the convent using a project by José Maria Nepomuceno to adapt the monastic buildings to a sanatorium and to install a small museum.

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  • Savana66's Profile Photo

    Why tiles?? find out at the National Tile Museum

    by Savana66 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    room11

    I decided to write this tip because Ive had a few people ask me "why tiles" or "why does everybody mention tiles everytime they speak of portugal?". I do not hold the truth for this one since many other countries have excelent tile work, but I think that getting to know the history of tiles in this country can tell you much about our history.
    If you choose to do so, I believe you should visit the "National Museum of Tiles". The museum is well organized and you can get the historical and cultural details on each of the pieces exposed.
    I truly think its worth the visit if its your kind of tourism.

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  • dcwizard's Profile Photo

    Museu Nactional do Azulejo (ceramic tiles)

    by dcwizard Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Museu Nacional do Azulejo is located in the former convent of Madre de Deus, founded in 1509 by Queen Leonor, widow of King João II and sister of King Manuel I. The building posseses noteworthy architectural spaces integrated in the visit route of the museum. The very old base of the collection covers a period between the 15th and beginning of the 19th centuries. It has been subsequently enriched with new pieces that allow the setting up of a route between archaic painted ceramic tiles (azulejos) from the second half of the 15th century and contemporary tile production.

    Opening hours
    Tuesday: 2.00 - 6.00 p.m.
    Wednesday to Sunday: 10.00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.
    Closed on Monday

    Entrance Fee
    3 Euros

    Library
    Opening hours: 10.00 - 12.30 a.m. and 2.00 - 4.00 p.m.
    Shop / Book shop
    Coffee Shop/ Restaurant
    Access for the handicapped

    Educational Services
    Guided visits and workshops for groups. Prior booking required.

    Free admission
    (Upon presentation of relevant card)
    - Children under 14
    - Members of APOM/ICOM, Academia Nacional de Belas Artes, Academia Portuguesa de História and Academia Internacional da Cultura Portuguesa
    - Accredited researchers
    - Journalists and tourism industry employees working in a professional capacity
    - Institutional sponsors of the museum
    - Employees of IPM and IPM-related organisations
    - Sundays and bank holidays, until 2.00 p.m.
    - “Prestige” Card holders (Protocol of Patronage / IPM and Fundação BCP)
    - Lisboa Card holders
    Discounts
    (Upon presentation of relevant card)
    50% - Senior citizens (over 65); Young people aged 15-25; Teachers
    60% - Youth Card holders

    Family Ticket
    (For families with two or more children)
    50% off the admission price for one of the parents

    IPM Season Tickets
    2 days - 5 Euros
    5 days - 8 Euros
    7 days - 10 Euros

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  • schmechi's Profile Photo

    Azulejos

    by schmechi Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lisbon Azulejo

    You'll see them everywhere in Lisbon: So called Azulejos, ceramic tiles used as facades of the houses or as interior decorations. Often they are composed mosaic-like to artistic wall-pictures.
    You'll see plenty of them just striving threw the city, but if you are intrested in this typical Portugese art, visit "Museo Nacional do Azulejo" (closed on Mondays). Beyond other fancy works of art, you'll see the most appreciated show-piece, an image of the pre-earthquake Lisbon before 1755.

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  • Dariana's Profile Photo

    Tiles-a national symbol

    by Dariana Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    corner in Madre de Deus church

    Portugal has a 500 years tradition in manufacturing tile that is one of the most original form of art. First imported from Sevilla the art of azulejos became a national symbol.Everywhere in Lisbon you can find azulejos: fom cathedral domes to cervejerias,benches and houses`façade.But the best place is Museu Nacional do Azulejos housed in the former convent of Madre de Deus.The church and its sacristy is remarkable for its rich ornamentation and in the hole museum there are a lot of stories told in tiles.

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  • katerina-dale's Profile Photo

    visit the National Museum of Azulejos in Lisbon

    by katerina-dale Updated Apr 4, 2011
    ex:azulejos in the station of Oporto

    As a traveller to Portugal you will certainly see a lot of places where the art of poruguese tiles is shown, from houses to parks and palaces, to the underground in Lisbon...

    But if this intrigues you enough and you would like to know more, than the best placeto visit is this museum, which is housed in a lovely old monastery.It is not huge so its visit will not take a whole day, 2-3 hours only.

    I was so amazed from the variety and the complexity of portuguese tles, and art in its won right. In his museum you get to learn the history of this art from its infancy to today's influence from modern art. It is a lovely experience.

    You also get to see a wonderful mosaic of tles which show Libon the way it used to be in the 19th century (I think).

    In addition you can also see part of the Monastery which is very ornated.

    Unfortunately visitors are not allowed totake photos int the rooms with the tiles. But you never forget waht you saw in this museum.

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  • SOLODANCER's Profile Photo

    A Convent that tells the story of tiles

    by SOLODANCER Updated Aug 6, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A 16th century tile panel at the Museu do Azulejo

    There probably isn't any place anywhere which presents and tells a great story about tiles and tile-making but in Lisbon. And it is therefore most appropriate city to have this great art and its long history associated with and having accompanied as well a succession of invasions, resultant wars and occupations, where the setting itself is as resplendent, evocative and grand as the art it represents and displays.

    The superlative and unique Museu Nacional do Azulejo (Tile Museum) is where one should go to see a whole panoply of tiles - ancient and old to the new - and experience a full enjoyment of its long artistic development and history. The museum itself is housed within and as part of the former Convento da Madre de Deus and its magnificently baroque and roccoco-style church which is worth a visit before or after the museum.

    The history of tile-making and its subsequent adaptation in Portugal to the country's architectural landscape came about as the direct result of the Moorish invasion and rule during the 8th century when Portugal became an unwilling serfdom of the fanatical Almoravids followed by the more tolerant Almohads which established a caliphate in Seville and Cordoba to which most of Portugal at this time subject to. Tile-making and processing is exclusively the origin of the Moors who first introduced them to the land of Al-Andalous (Spainish Andalucia) during the 1500's and then onwards to Portugal. The tiles of moorish-design are distinctively recognizable by its geometrical designs and flourish, heavily glazed and long-fired. By around 1600's, Portugal developed its own style and technique evolving into what is mostly known as the blue and white pattern, thus the name Azulejos.

    The museum is an eye-opener to everything tile work, granted that the visitor of course as I do has a real fondness for tiles. The first floor covers the tile-making techniques onwards to the entire history of tile expansion with amazing displays of decorative and invididual pieces filling up the rest of the museum. The most famous of them all is the 36 meter long blue and white wall panel panorama of ancient Lisbon prior to the 1755 earthquake which destroyed most of the city.

    The adjoining convent and church of Madre de Deus founded in 1502 by Queen Leonor, widow of King Joao II, is likewise filled on its walls with these blue and white azulejos depicting the life and story of both St. Francis and St. Anthony.

    To cap this marvelous visit, the visitor should also spend time at the convent's gorgeous Moorish cloisters and then unwind to have a meal or coffee or tea in the museum's restaurant and pleasantly tranquil garden.

    The museum is open everyday except on Mondays. Sunday is free admission.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Pavilhão dos Deportes

    by mikey_e Updated Jun 7, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the azulejos

    Inside the Parquê Eduardo V you will find a gift from Brazil to Portugal on the anniversary of its independence. It is a building that is now suffering from serious colonial rot that is covered with massive azulejos. The tiles describe the history of Portugal's discoverers and the battles they fought. Perhaps the saddest part of the experience is the neglect this site has suffered, but it is well worth the trip if you are interested in the art of azulejos. As a bonus it is not far from the Gulbenkian Institute.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Azulejo Museum

    by barryg23 Written Oct 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museu Nacional de Azulejo
    4 more images

    Portugal is famous for its azulejos, decorative ceramic tiles, which can be seen in churches, buildings, houses and even some pubs and restaurants all across the country.

    The Museu Nacional do Azulejo is a good place to visit if you have any interest in azulejos. There is an impressive collection of tiles dating from the 16th century, right up to the present day. One of the star exhibits is Portugal’s longest azure, a huge panorama of Lisbon more than 30 metres in length. The museum also explains the intricacies of how the tiles are produced.

    Two things to note about the museum: even though the most recent guidebooks to Lisbon both claimed there was free entry on Sundays, this was not the case (entrance cost is 3 Euros). Also, it can be difficult enough to get here by public transport as the museum is out in the east of the city beyond the train station. We took a bus from Praca da Comercio to Santa Apolonia station and then walked the remaining two kilometres.

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