Castles and palaces, Lisbon

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  • Castles and palaces
    by Dymphna1
  • Castles and palaces
    by Dymphna1
  • The views from the balconies
    The views from the balconies
    by Paul2001
  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Castelo de São Jorge

    by King_Golo Written Jun 16, 2014
    A rare tourist-free moment in Castelo de S��o Jorge
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    Despite the fact that the 11th-century Castelo de São Jorge is considered one of Lisbon's most spectacular sights, I was somewhat disappointed by parts of it. First of all, this was due to the rather high entrance fee (€ 7,50). Second, the castle is very crowded. Third, there is not exactly that much to see, just a few walls.

    However, you do have a nice view from up there and some parts of it are more interesting than others. This is mostly true for the actual fortified part of Castelo de São Jorge. Towers in all directions provide great panoramas and the long and steep passageway leading down to St. Lawrence Tower is spectacular on its own. It served as a means to leave the castle or as a possible way to transport goods in during a siege. In one of the other towers is the famous Camera Obscura which provides visitors with a new view of Lisbon. Unfortunately, the queue was extremely long so we couldn't go in - there's access only once every 20 or 30 minutes.

    What I liked best, though, were the peacocks. I hadn't expected to come across a good dozen of these majestic birds. They were parading all over the place, and we were lucky enough to see a male spreading its tail. Apparently, the peacocks are used to all the enthusiastic tourists around them and like to show off every now and then.

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    Castle of São Jorge

    by jlanza29 Written Mar 23, 2014
    cool towers
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    The Castle of São Jorge is a Moorish castle occupying a commanding hilltop overlooking the historic centre of the Portuguese city of Lisbon and Tagus River. The strongly fortified citadel dates from medieval period of Portuguese history, and is one of the main tourist sites of Lisbon.

    One takes the popular trolley to the bottom stop and walk up … there is clearly mark signs you can also follow the large crowds …. entrance to the Castle is 7.50 Euro's and we spent about an hour and saw everything in a non rushed way. It's smaller than it seems !!!!

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    Castle on a Hill

    by Toughluck Written Feb 19, 2014
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    The Castle of São Jorge is a Moorish castle occupying a commanding hilltop overlooking the historic centre of the Portuguese city of Lisbon and Tagus River. The strongly fortified citadel dates from medieval period of Portuguese history, and is one of the main tourist sites of Lisbon.

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    St George's Castle

    by Dymphna1 Written Jan 4, 2014
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    We were able to walk through the castle as a classical guitar played making it extremely romantic. The castle is a ruins that is a step back in time. It is also a good place for little ones to be able to stretch their legs.

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    Casa dos Bicos

    by solopes Updated Dec 16, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal

    Built in 1523 by a Portuguese businessman impressed and inspired by Italian architecture, this odd house has nothing in common with traditional Portuguese architecture, but it is one of the most surprising buildings that survived the earthquake.

    Halfway from Terreiro do Paço to Alfama, it is easily seen (and the outside is the only thing you may see).

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    Castelo de Sao Jorge

    by antistar Updated Dec 12, 2013

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    Castelo de Sao Jorge

    Offering great views both of the castle itself, and the city from the castle walls, the Castelo of Lisbon is an easily visited and unmissable landmark of the city. Placed right on top of the Alfalma, the castle is built within old Moorish walls, and after the re-capture of the city it became the home of the royal family, before they moved down to the ill-fated Terreiro do Paco where the Prace do Commerico is now.

    The complex is great to wander around, with cool shaded walks along the ramparts with views down on the city below, and a system of towers and fortifications to climb and get lost in.

    It costs 3 euros to enter, and strangely you must buy the tickets at a building some way down the hill and set back from the road, so be on your look out for a ticket office to save yourself time and energy.

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  • Castelo Sao Jorge

    by opalzebra3 Written Sep 29, 2013

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    The Castelo Sao Jorge, with a commanding view of LIsbon, was the seat of power until the 15th Century when another castle was built. It suffered massive damage during the 1755 great earthquake and is now primarily a tourist attraction with its remaining walls and towers. It's a great place for viewing the Lisbon sights from the Carmo Monastery and Placa Figueira right below on the west side, to the Pantheon on the east side and the Cristo Rei Monument on the south side. There are also tame peacocks roaming around the castle grounds. The current entrance fee is Euro 7.50.

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    The Palacio Nacional de Pena in Sintra

    by Paul2001 Updated Sep 23, 2013
    The Palacio  Nacional de Pena
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    The Palacio Nacional de Pena on the outskirts of Sintra brings to mind what you imagine a fairy tale castle to look like. This might be because it was commissioned in 1840 by Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, the husband of Queen Maria II with the intent to look fantastical. The builder commissioned was Baron Eschwege and designed a palace so out of this world that it amazing for it's otherworld appearance. The palace was built on top of the foundations of a 16th century monastery.
    As you approach the castle you will be overwhelmed by the onion shaped towers that hang over head. Once you enter the first gate you wonder through a maze of courtyards which feature a multitude of weird carvings and statues staring down at you. The interior of the palace feature many chambers, bedrooms and dining rooms all extravagantly furnished. Unfortunately you cannot take pictures inside of the palace. You can however take pictures from the balconies of the fantastic views. I was fortunate as the weather was very clear and the views of the surrounding countryside was stupendous. The palace also has a decent café which sits on a veranda that overlooks the rest of Sintra. It was a great place to have a small lunch and sip on a beer.
    The Palacio Nacional de Pena is open from 10am to 6:30pm during the summer. It closes at 4pm during the winter season. The palace is closed down on Mondays.

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    São Jorge Castle

    by Karlithus Written Sep 3, 2013
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    Lisbon’s medieval castle stands atop the highest of the city’s seven hills and offers another vantage point with breathtaking views of the city. Most of the castle has fallen into ruin over the years, especially after the Great Earthquake of 1755. However, visitors can still climb the towers and walk along the crenellated ramparts.

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    Around the castle

    by toonsarah Written Apr 21, 2013

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    Rua Augusto Rosa
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    Although we didn’t visit the castle (Castelo de São Jorge) on this occasion, we did spend some time wandering the pretty narrow lanes around and outside its walls. At times in these streets it is easy to forget that you are in a European capital city and instead imagine yourself in a small village somewhere. The lanes twist upwards between the old houses, and every turn brings a small surprise – a black cat basking in the sun outside a front door, a café with just a couple of tables squeezed into a strip of pavement, a colourful window-box packed with spring flowers, or an interesting piece of graffiti.

    As we reached the top of our chosen path, below the walls of the castle itself, we found an oddity – an old-fashioned urinal, of all things, with an equally old-fashioned sign! This wasn’t the most fragrant of spots, but just above it an orange tree clung to the castle walls and lured us up to a more sweet-scented corner and to views of the hillside we had climbed.

    All that remained was to make our way back down, by a different route, and seek out some fresh seafood for lunch ...

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    Presidential Palace

    by solopes Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal

    The official residence of the President of Portuguese Republic is a palace built in the 18th century in Belém.

    It's possible to visit the palace but only in organized groups, booked through the palace's national museum.

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    Lisbon Castle

    by solopes Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal
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    It's far from being one of the best castles in Portugal, but its precious story, accessibility, great sights over the city, and the typicism of the surrounding quarters turn it in a mandatory visit.

    At the eastern end of tram 28 line, it is a natural stop, to discover the city descending to the centre.

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    First King

    by solopes Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal (Jordan's pic)
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    The conquest of Lisbon was a decisive step towards our nationality and independence.

    Afonso Henriques, our first king is celebrated everywhere, and the castle is no exception.

    Some people identify the small figure at the entrance as the king - it's a clear mistake: it's St Jorge and not the king whose statue is in evidence inside the castle.

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    St George's Castle

    by jumpingnorman Updated Feb 15, 2013

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    St George's Castle, Lisbon, Portugal Sept 2009
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    During a September 2009 trip with my sister, we went up the Gloria funicular and ended up in one of the viewpoints where we saw in the distance- a castle! "Let’s go there!, " we exclaimed together, haha...

    St George's Castle can be seen from several vantage points in the city and is dedicated to the patron saint of England, St. George in 1371. But its history dates back well beyond that ---- it's oldest parts come from the 6th century and "built and rebuilt" by Romans, Visgoths, Moors and so forth...

    So, we did not hesitate to just grab a taxi to bring us to what is known as the St. George’s Castle which, due to its high location, provides an amazing panoramic view of the city.
    Our cab driver was so entertaining and he even brought us up straight to the gate of the castle, passing through extremely small curvy cobblestone roads and it was all for just 5 Euros.

    The ticket office is few steps down from the castle gate – it is a separate little building and I think I just paid 5 Euros for the entrance if I am not mistaken. But whatever it was, it was worth is because the castle grounds were wonderful to walk around in. There are several towers and small walkways and places you could climb up to – but be very careful if you have kids because they are high drops! It is also easy to get lost among the maze-like turret but just follow the crowds and they will hopefully lead you to the exit. So, if you’re in a rush, just remember places you passed so you don’t get lost going back to the entrance.

    You can go up the towers and have amazing views of the city. You can explore the wonderful buildings, eat at the restaurant and also visit the archeological museum in three underground chambers with one of them being where "Vasco da Gama was once received by King Manuel."

    Another must-SEE castle in Lisboa!

    0900-1800 Closed Jan 1, May 1 and Dec 25

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    The useful palace

    by solopes Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal

    This beautiful palace from the 18th century (Foz Palace), right in the centre of Lisbon, is now used as the centre for social communication ant tourist office.

    Most of its richness was moved, and today some rooms may be rented for social or cultural events.

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