Churches and monasteries, Lisbon

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    Church of S. Domingos

    by anaanes Written Apr 27, 2013

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    You never had seen any church like this.

    This churh has been built in 1241.
    In 1506 was in this church where the Portuguese Inquisition beguns with the condemnation of miles of jews to the fires.
    At 13th August of 1959 a violent fire destroyed the church. In 1994 the church was opened to the public again but with most of the damaged of the fire.
    The decision to show the damage made by the fire is a tribute to all the jews condemned to die in the inquisition fires in this church.

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    Penha de França - Church and Overlook

    by J_Antunes Written Apr 25, 2013

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    Penha de Fran��a
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    At 110meters high, is the hill of France, how it would translate in English. The name comes from the image of our lady of France that was inside the church.

    This old Lisbon neighborhood has a beautiful overlook over the north part of the city and a church/convent. This old church was destroyed in the 1755 earthquake killing hundreds of people that were in a mass inside. In the XIX century was completely restored to the old glory.

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    Church of Nossa Senhora da Conceição Velha.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 17, 2013

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    This church with its fabulous portal was built in Lisbon between 1502 and 1534. Dowager Queen Eleanor of Portugal, also known as Eleanor of Viseu founded the Confraria da Misericórdia (confraternity of charity) in 1498 and King Manuel I endowed the building of former synagogue known in previous times as Casa da Judiaria Grande to that Confraternity in 1502. Then confraternity converted that abandoned synagogue into Roman Catholic Church. Famous Southern Portal with the scene of Annunciation in Manuelino Style was built in 1533-1534 according to orders of King Joao III. There is figure of Roman Pope Leo X (pontificate 1513-1521) is on the tympanum of the Church. His real name was Lorenzo Medici (1475-1521) and he was known as Pope the Atheist.
    Unfortunately there is nothing interesting inside of that church. Interior is the typical baroque of XVIII century. The reason is very simple. Manuelino Portal is the on only part of the old church survived that disastrous earthquake of 1755.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed in the church.

    Admission is free but please don’t forget that any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Open from 08:30-19:30

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    Saint Anthony

    by solopes Updated Mar 17, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal

    Born in Lisbon and dead in Padua, Saint Anthony is the patron of Lisbon (and of Padua too). His church was destroyed by the earthquake of 1755 and rebuilt afterwards with popular subscriptions, especially from children who create a tradition of asking for a dime to the saint ("Um tostão para o Santo António". That's why the floor is full of coins.

    Saint Anthony is also the saint of marriages, introducing the tradition of a prayer in the church before the ceremony. Since the middle of last century another tradition was born: The state pays the marriage of poor people, that accept to marry in a common ceremony in June 13th, largely covered by TV and media.

    The church stays very close to the Cathedral.

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    Carmo Convent

    by solopes Updated Mar 9, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal
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    Built in the 14th century by the hero of Aljubarrota, Nuno Alvares Pereira, celebrated in Praça da Figueira, and especially in Batalha, this convent was seriously destroyed by the earthquake of 1755, and it was never totally repaired.

    Now it stands as a reminder that another earthquake is coming, no one knows when, and meanwhile, it is used as the Archaeological Museum. It's almost impossible to visit Lisbon without seeing it, and it is easy to reach using the lift of Santa Justa

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    Sao Vicente

    by solopes Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    Lisbon - Portugal
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    Close to the Pantheon and Alfama, this church, following an Italian style, it's not a top attraction, but it has some beautiful chapels, and adjacent to it an old monastery with good panels of Portuguese tiles and other interesting details.

    You may also visit the tombs of the kings of the fourth and last dynasty.

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    Sé de Lisboa

    by Ines_ Written Dec 21, 2012

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    Sé (which stands for Sedes Episcopalis), was founded in 1150 to commemorate the defeat of the Moors three years earlier and the conquerors built the sanctuary on the spot where Moorish Lisbon's main mosque once stood. Inside you can see the beautiful stained glass, the 13th-century cloister and the sacristy. Today it's a national monument.

    The entrance is free (it’s great in the summer when outside the temperature is high!) but to enter the cloister and sacristy there’s an entrance fee of 2.5€ or together 4€.

    The church is open every day until 7 pm. The other parts close at Sunday and holidays and daily at 5pm.

    Subway: Terreiro do Paço, blue line
    Tram: 12, 28
    Bus: 37

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    Convento do Carmo

    by Ines_ Written Dec 19, 2012

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    Carmo’s convent and church ruins are in Largo do Carmo in Baixa. This church was built in 1423 and at that time it was the biggest church in Lisbon. Today, this gothic church is in ruins due to the great earthquake in 1755.

    Even if partially destroyed is still worth a visit as its beauty and mysticism didn’t go away. The outside of the church can be seen in Rossio and you can access the church either by foot, Santa Justa’s lift, subway (Baixa/Chiado) or tram 28

    The museum is open from Monday to Saturday (10:00am to 17:00pm)
    Prices are 1.50€/2€

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    The Mosteiro dos Jerónimos in Belem-The Cloisters

    by Paul2001 Written Oct 10, 2012

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    As wonderful as the church at the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos is, it would be a shame not to visit the adjoining cloisters. Here you will see some of the best examples of Manueline architecture in Portugal and certainly the best you will in find in the vicinity of Lisbon. To enter the cloisters, you have to approach the entrance to the right of the west portal of church. The entry fee is 6 Euros. Once you enter you will overpowered by the splendidly carved columns and turrets of the two story cloister. There are also a serious of gargoyles that overlook the cloister.
    The cloisters where completed in1544 after the main church of the monastery. Inside the chambers that surround the cloister there are several rooms and chambers that are dedicated to important figures in Portuguese history. They include Luís Vaz de Camões, Fernando Pessoa and Herculano. Be sure to visit all of this because if found that no aspect of the cloisters disappointed.

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    Mosteiro dos Jerónimos in Belem

    by Paul2001 Updated Oct 4, 2012

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    The Mosteiro dos Jer��nimos
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    The Mosteiro dos Jerónimos in the Belem neighborhood outside of Lisbon, is probably the most remarkable example of Portugal's famed Manueline architecture monuments. This stupendous monastery was built by Dom Manuel in 1505 in honour of Vasco de Gama who discovered the sea route to India in 1498. De Gama's tomb is housed inside of the monastery.
    The first thing you notice when visiting the monastery is the stunning stone carvings that line the Main Portal on the south side of the building. I doubt that there was a better example of Manueline architecture anywhere else in Portugal that match this portal.
    The entrance to the church is through the west portal. The church is free to enter and is open Tuesday to Sunday but closed on Monday. Upon entering the church you notices the very thick pillars that reach up to the brilliantly carved ceiling. One is reminded of a forest canopy as you walk underneath. To the right is Vasco de Gama's tomb. As you wander around the church you will notice the excellent carvings on the pillars. It is a shame that the place is so crowded, as you feel that you are being hustled through it. Please be very quiet here as it is a place of worship. The guardians will actually tell you to shush if you make too much noise.
    When you leave the church you should turn to the right and visit the cloisters.

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    Casa dos Bicos - José Saramago Foundation

    by J_Antunes Written Sep 30, 2012
    Casa dos Bicos

    Casa dos Bicos is a very peculiar building in the Lisbon city centre. It was built in the XVI century with an inspiration of two palaces in Italy. With the earthquake significant parts of the house collapsed but the façade remains. Today it became the foundation of José Saramago, the Portuguese writer awarded with the Nobel Prize.

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    Conceição Velha Church

    by J_Antunes Updated Sep 30, 2012
    Concei����o Velha Church

    Unfortunately, most of the times, this beautiful church is closed. The highlight is the manueline portic, one of the few of this architectural style, dating back to the XVI century and that resisted the 1775 earthquake.

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    Basilica da Estrela

    by solopes Updated Sep 21, 2012

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    Estrela - Lisbon - Portugal
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    At the westernmost stop of tram 28, a big church from the 18th century, keeps the tomb of queen Maria I. That queen orederd the building of this church to pay a promise made if she had a male son. She did, but the child died before the end of construction with smallpox.

    Facing the church there's a pleasant small garden with the same name.

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    Sao Roque

    by solopes Updated Sep 7, 2012

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    Sao Roque - Lisbon - Portugal
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    A discreet facade hides one of the best collections of portuguese treasures - the church of S. Roque also called Misericordia.

    Just in the centre of town it is a simple building with four different chapels in each side. Each one of them is a masterpiece, but the chapel of S. Joao Batista, made in lapis-lazuli is astonishing. Simply... don't miss it.

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    S Domingos

    by solopes Updated Aug 23, 2012

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    Lisbon - S Domingos
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    Several million people pass, each year, by this church, in the heart of Lisbon. Who dares to enter? Less than 1%. Work, for locals, or prevailing highlights to tourists, give no time for that.

    But, having time, why not?

    Did you know that, damaged by the earthquake of 1755, this church was rebuilt using the remains of the Royal Chapel, also destroyed in the same cataclysm?

    Did you know that, in 1954, a fire burned the entire interior that still keep evidences of it?
    No need to enter, but, since you are there… having time...

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