Grand structures and architecture, Lisbon

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  • Grand structures and architecture
    by anaanes
  • Grand structures and architecture
    by anaanes
  • Rossio Train Station
    Rossio Train Station
    by anaanes
  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Monastery to museum

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Jan 27, 2012

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    Photo: Stark reminder - Convento do Carmo

    The Elevador de Santa Justa will take you straight up (and I mean straight up - it's a vertical lift) to the higher reaches of Chiado. The lift's exit brings you right to the level of the extraordinary ruin of the Convento do Carmo, a stark reminder of the damage wrought on the city by the catastrophic earthquake of 1755.

    Built of pale grey - almost white - stone, its lancet windows and nave open to the sky, it stands like a ghost of lost Lisbon, an evocation of the mediaeval city that disappeared into rubble. Now it houses the city's Achaeological Museum, some of the pieces distributed among the columns and bays of the roofless nave whilst the apsidal chapels house more precious and less weatherproof artifacts, including Roman and Visigoth pieces, some fine royal tombs and Andean mummies - an eclectic mix!

    Entry fee for Convento and fare payable for elevador.

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    Casa dos Bicos: Fanciful and unique, then and now

    by berenices Updated Dec 6, 2011

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    Casa dos Bicos (House of the Spikes) was constructed in 1523 and owned by a son of the viceroy of then Portuguese India, Brás de Albuquerque. It was built in the Alfama neighborhood and was so named for the diamond-shaped spikes adorning its entire facade. It was patterened after some urban palaces in Italy where Albuquerque stayed for some time, though he incorporated Manueline style of architecture in the windows and portals. Manueline is a Portuguese late Gothic architectural style named after the King who promoted this unique style whose designs were inspired by the great discoveries, e.g. ropes (used by the ships).

    Part of the building was destroyed during the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755, and in the late 19th century was bought by a codfish trader from the original owner. For years, it was a warehouse for dried codfish until the Lisbon municipality acquired it in the 1960s.

    Very recently, the building was restored in order to serve a new function -- to be the new office of the Saramago Foundation, which will also house the entire collection of the Nobel Laureate. More important, Saramago, who died in 2010, himself chose to have his ashes buried in front of the house, under an olive tree.

    Thus, today, the place can be visited for its history, its uniqueness, and its new role as the resting place of one of Portugal's most important figure in modern times.

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    Rossio Station

    by solopes Updated Aug 31, 2011

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    Rossio Station, Lisbon
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    The most central train station has been closed for sometime, due to problems in the tunnel.

    Now reopened with a face-lift, this neo-manueline building is the most impressive in the short connection between Rossio and Restauradores. But don’t limit yourself to the look of its facade: go inside and see its beautiful roof.

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    Monument to Christ

    by ruki Written Aug 16, 2011

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    This monument is the similar as the famous statue in Rio de Janeiro. It built in 1959 and have 28 m high. It opens its arms to Lisbon, and there is a sweeping view of the city and the 25 de Abril Bridge from the top of the 82 m high pedestal. You have an elevator for climbing.

    To see monument use ferry from Cais do Sodre Station across the river to Cacilhas, and then take a 101 bus outside the station that stop right by the monument

    Open: 9 am- 6 pm

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    Bridge 25 april

    by ruki Updated Jul 25, 2011

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    This bridge is completed in 1966. At the first it was named as a Salazar, and after revolution changed its name in April 25 (1974).
    It could be said this this bridge is Golden Gates twin sister (because of its appearance it looks like a American bridge in San Francisco)
    This bridge on the Tejo river is 21th largest bridge in the world (2277m).

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    Torre de Belem Belem Tower

    by dila Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Torre de Sao Vicente de Belem
    Build between 1514 and 1520 designed by Fransico da Arruda.
    open
    winter 10.00 - 17.00 Oct.-April
    summer 10.00 - 18.30 May-Sept
    last entry half hour before closing
    closed on
    monday, 1 januari, easter sunday, 1 may, 25th december
    entrance
    adults 4 euro
    Dual Ticket (Mosteiro dos Jerónimos/Torre de Belém): € 8
    Tour Ticket: Lisboa Monumental (Mosteiro dos Jerónimos/Torre de Belém/ Palácio da Ajuda): € 10
    Group Ticket (according to the number of visitors): 100 up to 200 visitors (5% discount); 201 up to 500 visitors (10% discount); more than 500 visitors (20% discount)
    65 and older and disabled by showing a suitable card: € 2
    Youth Card: € 1,6
    Family Card (parents with two or more children under 18, 50% discount upon the ticket price of one of the parents - mother or father): € 2

    Free Admission:
    Children till 14 years old
    Sundays and Holidays till 2.00 pm
    For individual teachers and students (maximum 15 vistors) or teachers and students on study visit, subject to previous booking and a suitable document from school or college
    Lisboa Card

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    Padrão dos Descobrimentos

    by gordonilla Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Exterior 1
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    The Monument of the Discoveries was built to commemorate Portugeese maritime discoveries. Openedin 1960 to commemorate the 500 year anniversary of Prince henry "the Navigator" who was the man behond the discoveries being made.

    It is 52m high and is in the shape of a ship's prow - there are 33 Portugeese personalities shown from the time of the discoveries.

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    Praco Do Comercio

    by littlesam1 Updated Dec 8, 2010
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    Walking to the waterfront in downtown Lisbon you will find the beautiful square Praco Do Comercio. Here you can find places to sit and people watch while enjoying the tranquility of the waterfront. Just behind you will be the bustling city of Lisbon, but for a few moments you forget the city and enjoy the water front. I love to take photos of equestrian statues when I travel. Here in Praco Do Comercio I found the grand Equestrian Statue of King Jose I.

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    Arco das Amoreiras

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 8, 2010

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    Built in 1748, this arch transports the aqueduct over a road and into the Mãe d'Água (Mother of the Water) reservoir which is now the Water Museum. Although the project was still unfinished, the aqueduct finally started to bring water to the city of Lisbon, a fact celebrated in the construction of this commemorative arch.

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    Aqueduct

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 8, 2010

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    Built between 1731 and 1748 to bring the city its first clean drinking water, Lisbon's remarkable aqueduct is made up of 109 stone arches, which were the tallest stone arches in the world when they were built. Its total length is 18km (12 miles), but the most visible part are the 35 arches crossing the Alcantara Valley (the best views are from Campolide train station), the tallest of which rise to a spectacular 65m (213ft) from the ground with a span of 29m (95ft). Astoundingly, it all survived the 1755 earthquake.

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    Water Museum/Mãe d'Água

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 8, 2010

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    Designed by the architect Hungaro Carlos Mardel, in 1752, its construction lasted until 1834. Utilized to receive and distribute the waters of the Aqueduct and for being an essential component of water supply to the city of Lisbon, it has a capacity of 5,500 cubic meters. At its west façade, Amoreiras street, is the house of the Registry, where they measured the flow of water circulating through underground tunnels, into the fountains of the city. You can walk up onto the roof terrace for some great views over the city and see inside the aqueduct. I was the only one visiting when I was there and so had this impressive feat of engineering all to myself.

    Open: 10am-6pm Mon-Sat, closed Sundays. Admission: €2.50.

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    Arco da Victoria

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 6, 2010

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    Opening towards Augusta Street, which links the northern part of Commercial Square with the other traditional Lisbon square, the Rossio, the original project by Eugénio dos Santos planned a triumphal arch, but this was only realised in 1875. This arch, usually called the Arco da Rua Augusta, was designed by Veríssimo da Costa. It has a clock on the other side and statues of Glory, Ingenuity and Valour (by the French sculptor Camels) and those of Viriatus, Nuno Álvares Pereira, Vasco da Gama and, of course, the Marquis of Pombal.

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    Portal de Nossa Senhora da Conceicao Velha

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 6, 2010

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    The Portal de Nossa Senhora da Conceicao Velha is all that remains from the Igreja de Nossa Senhora da Misericordia, which was destroyed in the 1755 earthquake. It had originally been commissioned in the 15th century by the widow of King Joao II, Leonor, on the site of an old synagogue. Decorated with a rich profusion of Manueline details, with an emphasis on angels, flowers, armillar spheres and the cross of the Ordem de Cristo, the Portal further displays the Virgem Maria (Virgin Mary) protecting with her mantle historical figures namely Pope Leao X.

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    Panteão de Santa Engrácia

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 6, 2010

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    Originally built as a church between 1682 and 1712, this impressive building was converted into the National Pantheon in which important Portuguese personalities are buried. It is located in the neighbourhood of Alfama, close to another important Lisbon monument, the Monastery of São Vicente de Fora.

    The current building of the Church of Santa Engrácia substituted previous churches dedicated to a martyr of the city of Braga, Saint Engrácia. The first church dedicated to the Saint was sponsored by Princess Maria, daughter of King Manuel I, around 1568. In 1681, building of the current church began after previous structures collapsed. However, in 1712, the architect died. King John V lost interest in the church, concentrating his resources in the gigantic Convent of Mafra. The church was left unfinished until the 20th century and eventually a dome was added.

    It was then reinaugurated in 1966, during the government of the Dictator António de Oliveira Salazar, and turned into a National Pantheon. The personalities buried here include the Presidents of the Republic Manuel de Arriaga, Teófilo Braga, Sidónio Pais and Óscar Carmona, Presidential candidate Humberto Delgado, writers João de Deus, Almeida Garrett, Guerra Junqueiro and Aquilino Ribeiro and fado singer Amália Rodrigues. There are cenotaphs to Luís de Camões, Pedro Álvares Cabral, Afonso de Albuquerque, Nuno Álvares Pereira, Vasco da Gama and Henry the Navigator.

    Open: 10am-5pm every day except Mondays. Admission: €3.00

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    Roman Theatre Ruins

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 5, 2010

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    Located above Lisbon's Cathedral and across a small road from a museum about it, Lisbon's Roman Theatre was probably constructed at the beginning of the empire (1st half of the 1st century AD) and remodelled in AD 57 in Emperor Nero's time. It's the only one found in Portugal and had a capacity to hold between 3,000 and 5,000 spectators. It was abandoned as a scenic space in the 4th century and made the most of for private use where it remained buried until it was rediscovered 1798. Visible today are parts of the rows of benches, the orchestra and the stage's subjacent pavement.

    Open: 10am-1pm & 2-6pm Tues-Sun. Closed Mondays. Admission: Free.

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