Parks and the Zoo, Lisbon

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  • Carlos Lopes sports pavilion
    Carlos Lopes sports pavilion
    by ValbyDK
  • Parque Eduardo VII
    Parque Eduardo VII
    by ValbyDK
  • Monumento ao 25 de Abril
    Monumento ao 25 de Abril
    by ValbyDK
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Oceanographic Aquarium - El Oceanográfico

    by breughel Updated Feb 27, 2011

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the best and largest aquariums with those of Barcellona and Seville in Spain.
    Really worthwhile visiting.
    Outside the centre of Lisbon on the Expo 98 site. Easiest is to go there by taxi (they are not expensive in Lisbon) but ask the driver to bring you the "Oceanografico" not just at the general entrance which is still far away from the Aquarium.
    The "Oceanografico" is composed of five parts on three floors:
    The Global Ocean in the centre of the building is an impressive 1.000 m2 and 5.000 m3 tank with a depth of 7 m with four massive 49 m2 (each!) acrylic windows on its sides and smaller windows at the corners. The water temperature is kept at a mild level so that about 100 species share this aquarium. Sharks, rays, among others are swimming around.
    Quite amazing is the ocean sunfish, Mola mola, it is the heaviest known bony fish in the world. In French we call him Poisson Lune (moon fish).
    There are four other parts: North Atlantic, Antarctic, Temperate Pacific and Tropical Indian each with their specific fauna and decor.

    Open
    Summer – 10.00 h
    Ticket office close – 19.00 h, Exhibits close – 20.00 h
    Winter – 10.00 h
    Ticket office close – 18.00 h, Exhibits close – 19.00 h

    Entrance prices: normal 12 €; 4 - 12 yr 6€; seniors 6,50 €.
    Photos allowed without flash.

    The OCEANÁRIO has a restaurant ÁGUA E SAL which is comfortable and good.

    Sunfish, Diver feeding the Manta ray Coral sea El Oceanografico
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    • Beaches

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    Jardim Botânico;Museu Nacional de História Natural

    by 64novpt Updated Nov 18, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Until around 1985 the Sciences College was here in the building at the entrance, now it's the Natural History Museum. The Botanical Garden of Lisbon University is a scientific garden, designed in the mid-nineteenth century. It's was "our" garden while students at the college. It's a National Monument since Nov 4, 2010.
    The enormous diversity of plants collected by its first gardeners from the four corners of the world where there were territories under Portuguese sovereignty, represented the importance of the colonial power Portugal.
    In the heart of Lisbon and in sharp contrast with its bustle, the colors and shades, smells and sounds of the Garden give peace and delight.

    When to visit:
    Summer (1 April to 31 October):
    During the week: open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
    Week ends and holidays: open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

    Winter (1 November to 31 March):
    During the week: open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    Week- ends and holidays – open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    Closed on Christmas and New Year’s day

    How to get there:
    Metro: Rato station, yellow line
    Buses: 58, 92, 711, 790

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    Jardim Botanico: an oasis in the heart of the city

    by berenices Updated Sep 28, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Botanic Garden was created in 1873 to impress and to inspire, and it does, even more to this day. In the heart of Lisbon, it is almost difficult to imagine an area that is so separate, so special as to transport the visitor to an honest-to-goodness garden of giant trees and plants so varied, stately and beautiful, that can be reached by only a few steps or a turn from the busy and noisy street.

    The garden is located in 4 hectares of land, and is a living museum of flora from various parts of the world, collected from various expeditions in Africa, Asia, and Brazil in the 18th century and brought to Lisbon. It is thus, not just a garden for aesthetic purposes or for leisure, but is a scientific one -- these plants were specimens studied along these years by botanists and researchers from the Polytechnic Institute. Today, the garden is being managed by the Museum of Natural History.

    There is an entrance fee to go in, but if you visit the Museum of Natural History which is the building in front, the ticket includes entrance to the garden. On entering, don't be mislead by the smallish square untidy garden on the left...that's not the one. Keep going until you reach the wide steps with the imposing statue, which is the real entrance to the garden. You will see the old Lisbon observatory on your left, dilapated and run-down now, as you stand on the top of those steps.

    A very nice place to spend an afternoon in -- there are benches where you can relax, and since the garden runs on several levels and makes some turns, it's quite easy to find a corner for yourself.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Family Travel

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    Parque Eduardo VII

    by tim07 Updated Feb 23, 2010

    Named after the British monarch Edward VII who visited the city in 1903, it's the largest park in central Lisbon. Box hedging and walkways rise uphill from Marques de Pombal Square, giving the visitor sweeping views of the city.

    The park has two greenhouses full of tropical plants, ponds, palms & cacti. Opposite these is a tiled sports pavillion dedicated to Carlos Lopes, the Portuguese athelete who won the marathon at the Los Angeles olympics.

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  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    Parque Eduardo VIII

    by Andrew_W_K Updated Jul 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A large and impressive park on a fairly steep hillside overlooking the city and the Tagus river in the distance. There are well kept and interesting botanical gardens within easy reach of the city centre. Much of it indoors and a very modest entry fee. If you are in Lisbon out of season it can be quite cold and the botanical gardens serve as a warm refuge.

    The botaical Gardens Cacti in the botanical gardens Parque Eduardo VIII

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  • J_Antunes's Profile Photo

    Windmills...

    by J_Antunes Written Mar 24, 2009

    Lisbon is a windy city and in times long gone the hills that are now covered by buildings were covered by farms and fields. To transform the cereals into bread several windmills were built. Some remain in Monsanto but in ruins. In Restelo district there is a small park with two old windmills a heritage of these times. These windmills were built in the XVIII century for the dominican irish nuns of the convent of Bom Sucesso.

    The park has 5 acres, an amphitheater for shows, nice trees, a lawn and some views over the city.

    Windmills
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    The Amusement Park at the Lisbon Zoo

    by mikelisaanna Updated Nov 30, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the entrance to the Lisbon Zoo, there is a small amusement park with a number of rides for smaller children. Our daughter Anna especially liked the bumper cars and the carousel.

    There is no admission charge for the amusement park. You pay for individual rides as you ride them.

    Anna enjoying the bumper car ride
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips

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    Parque Eduardo VII

    by J_Antunes Written Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the most important park of the Lisbon city center. Dating back to 1903 it was named after Eduard VII the english king that visited Lisbon in the previous year confirming the alliance between the two countries.
    The park is quite interesting has 5 hectares, some sportive facilities, the Carlos Lopes pavillion, a nice view over the city and a jewel inside Lisbon the Estufa Fria.
    Estufa Fria is a 8.100 sqm of gardens inside some greenhouses and full of exotic species. Entry costs 1,61€. This place is almost in the left side of the park when you are climbing to the belvedere.
    Every year the Lisbon book fair is held in the central area of the park.
    In the top there is a controversial monument dedicated to the revolution of the 25th of April.

    Estufa Fria Parque Parque belvedere estufa Fria
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Coelho Memorial

    by keeweechic Written Aug 25, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the centre of the part is a small memorial which was placed there in 1904 and dedicated to Lisbon’s first newspaper Chief Eduardo Coelho. The ‘Diario de Noticias’ was founded by Coelho in 1863 and ran its operations for 25 years. The small statue in front of Coehlo’s memorial is of a newspaper boy.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Estrela Garden

    by keeweechic Written Aug 23, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Right across from the Basilica da Estrela are some lovely gardens which are very popular with families. There are both local and exotic trees and plants and a small lake with ducks and statues. Also within the gardens is a childrens playground and a café. The gardens are open from 7.00am to midnight.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Jardim Zoologico

    by keeweechic Written Aug 23, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It sounds like the Lisbon zoo has been greatly improved on to what it used to be like and has modernised itself to the betterment of the inhabitants. The zoo was opened in 1905 and one of the main features is the gardens. Some of the attractions at the zoo include a reptile house, dolphin shows, cable car which gives an aerial view of the park and an amusement park.

    Open 10.00am to 6.00pm during the cooler months and to 8.00pm during the summer months.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Zoo
    • Architecture

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    Edward VII Park Facilities

    by keeweechic Written Aug 22, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Also within Edward VII Park there is the Carlos Lopes pavilion which was built in 1932 and named after a Portuguese athlete. There is also a swimming pool, tennis court, gym and a restaurant. The park was originally called Liberty Park but renamed to reiterate the anglo-Portuguese alliance.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Edward VII Park

    by keeweechic Written Aug 22, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is one of Lisbon’s largest parks and was named after Englands Edward VII. Right down the centre of the park is a pattern of box hedges which stretch from the top of the hill right down to Marques de Pombal Square. Within the park there are also patterned mosaic paths, a hothouse and greenhouse containing ponds, and both tropical and exotic plants.

    The park is open from 9.00am – 5.30pm daily.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Botanic Garden

    by Aitana Written Aug 3, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Botanic Garden was commanded by the King of Portugal to Marquis of Pombal in 1768, as a part of the Ajuda Palace. It would be a garden for his children, both playful and educational. It was projected by an Italian botanist, with the aim to study and gather the widest collection of plant species.
    Today, it still has one of the largest collections of subtropical vegetation in Europe. There are over 18,000 species from all over the world.
    Its dense vegetation and exotic plants make it one of the most calming spots in the city. It covers 3.5 hectares, but the high walls make it almost invisible from the surrounding streets.

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    Breathtaking Oceanario

    by pikuu Updated Jun 4, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fabulous world. Thousends species from the water world: fishes, mammals, invertebrates. And this amazing atmosphere when you standing in the darkness observing luminous underwater world with the most peculiar animals you've ever seen.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    This meeting with mantas, lunar medusas, sharks, giant crabs, barracudas, coral reefs, shoals of colourful fishes, octopuses and finally with the ceasar of the main aquarium, colosal Sunfish is impossible to describe. You feel it, you have got thousends of impressions in your mind but you can't describe all of them. No proper words, no chances to link all the images, sounds and visions. The expeditions for hours and even days.

    Aboslutely MUST SEE place.

    All the useful details you will find here:
    www.oceanario.pt

    Jellyfish like mushroom Manta - the queen of Oceanario Shark form Lisbon Oceanario
    Related to:
    • Aquarium

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