Plazas and squares, Lisbon

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  • Fountain at Rossio Square
    Fountain at Rossio Square
    by anaanes
  • D. Pedro IV Statue
    D. Pedro IV Statue
    by anaanes
  • D. Pedro IV Statue
    D. Pedro IV Statue
    by anaanes
  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Statue of King José I

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 6, 2010

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    Located in the centre of Commercial Square is the equestrian statue of King José I which was inaugurated in 1775. This bronze statue, the first monumental statue dedicated to a King in Lisbon, was designed by Joaquim Machado de Castro, Portugal's foremost sculptor of the time.

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    Figueira Square

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 5, 2010

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    Meaning Fig Tree Square, this square lies to the north-east of Praça de Dom Pedro IV/Rossio Square and was mostly occupied by the Hospital Real de Todos os Santos (All-Saints Royal Hospital) before the earthquake of 1755. The area was then turned into a large market before a large covered market of 8,000 m² was built in 1885. This market existed until 1949, when it was demolished, and since then the square has been an open space.

    In 1971 a bronze equestrian statue representing King John I (1357-1433), by sculptor Leopoldo de Almeida, was inaugurated in the square. The monument also carries medallions with the effigies of Nuno Álvares Pereira and João das Regras, two key characters in the 1385 Revolution that brought John I to power.

    Be careful if you want to take a closer look at the statue as the square is a major traffic hub with bus and metro stops.

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    Statue of Dom Pedro IV

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 5, 2010

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    The current name of the Rossio (Praça de Dom Pedro IV) pays homage to Pedro IV, King of Portugal as well as first Emperor of Brazil (as Pedro I). His bronze statue, erected in 1874, is seen on top of a column in the middle of the square. However, the name of the square has never been accepted by the public.

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    Praça de Dom Pedro IV/Rossio Square

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 5, 2010

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    Formerly known as The Rossio, this centrally located square has been one of Lisbon's main squares since the Middle Ages. It has been the setting of popular revolts and celebrations, bullfights and executions, and is now a preferred meeting place of Lisbon natives and tourists alike. The Rossio became an important place in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries, when the population of the city expanded to the lower area surrounding the Lisbon Castle hill. The name "rossio" is roughly equivalent to the word "commons" in English, and refers to a commonly owned terrain. Most buildings around the Rossio date from the reconstruction of the Pombaline Downtown (Baixa) carried out after the great 1755 Lisbon Earthquake.

    The current name of the Rossio pays homage to Pedro IV, King of Portugal as well as first Emperor of Brazil (as Pedro I). His bronze statue, erected in 1874, is seen on top of a column in the middle of the square. However, the name of the square has never been accepted by the public. Surrounding the square are a few cafes, the ubiquitous McDonald's, the splendid National Theatre of Dona Maria II to the north, Rossio Train Station and shops.

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    Restauradores Square

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 5, 2010

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    This rectagonal square (if that makes sense!) is located at the southeast end of Avenida da Liberdade, near Rossio square. The square is dedicated to the restoration of the independence of Portugal in 1640, after 60 years of Spanish domination. The obelisk in the middle of the square, inaugurated in 1886, carries the names and dates of the battles fought during the Portuguese Restoration War, in 1640.

    The monument was designed by António Tomás da Fonseca, with statues symbolising "Independence" and "Victory" by sculptors Simões de Almeida and Alberto Nunes.

    The square is surrounded by 19th and early 20th century buildings with the best being the Palácio Foz (Foz Palace), built between the 18th and 19th centuries and boasting magnificently decorated interiors, and the old Eden Cinema (now a hotel), with a beautiful Art Deco façade dating from the 1930s, a work by architect Cassiano Branco.

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    Jardim do Príncipe Real

    by 64novpt Written Nov 18, 2010

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    The garden with an area of 1.2 ha, was designed in the English romantic love and arranged around a large lake with an octagonal fountain.
    In 1863 the Water Company completed construction of a water reservoir there, the "Reservatório da Patriarcal" that, in addition, to supply the garden made the connection with several fountains in the city: Século, Loreto and S. Pedro de Alcantara. This reservoir is part of the EPAL Water Museum.
    The official name is Jardim França Borges in honor this Republican journalist, a bust was placed there in 1915.
    On the month's last saturday you can find a fair with contemporary crafts, author pieces and antiques. It began as a spontaneous initiative of a group of citizens has become today an exhibition that takes place regularly.

    Buses: 58 and 100; Metro: Rato

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    Praça da Figueira

    by mikey_e Written Aug 24, 2010

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    Statue of Dom Luis
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    The Praça da Figueira is a charming square that is just east of Rossio and much quieter than the Praça Dom Pedro V. It was originally a hospital for use of the city residents until the massive earthquake in 1755 and was rebuilt by the Marquês do Pombal afterward. The market here continued to function outdoors until 1885, when a covered market was built. The market functioned until the 1950s, when the Fascist government decided to abolish it. The Praça is a pleasant little space in the centre of the city with plenty of restaurants and hotels, as well as traditional shops, but without the traffic and noise that dominates many other sections of the capital’s core. There’s also a large status of Dom Luis in the centre of the square, erected in the 1970s. During the summer, there are also various events that are held in the square.

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    Restauradores Square

    by tim07 Updated Feb 25, 2010

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    This large square in the centre of Lisbon commemorates the country's liberation from 60 years of Spanish rule in 1640.

    In the centre of the square is a 30 metre high obelisk. On its pedestal are two bronze figures depicting Victory an Freedom. On the squares west side is Foz Palace. This was formerly the residence of the Marquis of Foz, it's now a national tourism office.

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    Praça dos Restauradores

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 17, 2009

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    Pra��a dos Restauradores - Lisbon
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    The Praça dos Restauradores is a busy square at the North side of center Lisbon.

    It has its own metro station and many bus stops. The Rossio train station and the Elevador da Glória are adjacent.

    In the center of the square is the Obelisk and the sculpture that commemorates the 1640 restoration of Portugal's Independence from Spain; no wonder that the street leading North from this square is called the Avenida da Liberdade (Liberty Avenue).

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    Praça Luis de Camôes

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Dec 8, 2009

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    Pra��a Luis de Cam��es - Lisbon
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    The Praça Luis de Camôes square is a small busy square adjacent to the Igreja de Nossa Senhora do Loreto Church.

    In the center of the square is a big statue of the Portuguese poet Luis de Camôes that was erected in 1867.

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    Praça da Figuiera

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 3, 2009

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    Dom Jo��o I statue
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    The Praça da Figuiera square is in the heart of Rossio.

    The old trams that rides along the square gives the square a historic appearance.

    The square center is favored by local scate boarders, who show their skills around the Dom João I statue.

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    Rua Augusta

    by rcsparty Written Nov 28, 2009

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    This is a lively pedestrian zone, just inside the arch coming from Praca do Comercio. It is covered in mosaic patterns and lined with boutiques and open air cafes. I spent an entire afternoon, just bouncing from café to café, enjoying watching the crowds and the beautiful weather.

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    Praca da Figueira

    by rcsparty Written Nov 28, 2009

    This square was once the city’s main marketplace. The square is surrounded by cafes, hotels, and shopes, and centered by a statue of Joao I, which was erected in 1971. It is yet another square in Lisbon that you can enjoy a relaxing drink, while you people watch. There are also some great views of the castle from here

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    Praca dos Restauradores

    by rcsparty Written Nov 28, 2009

    This square, and the obelisk that dominates the center, commemorate the liberation of Portugal from Spain in 1640. The bronze figures on the pedestal depict Victory and Freedom. The names and dates on the sides are from the battles of the War of Restoration. The square is lined with trees and has plenty of cafes to enjoy a few hours watching the crowds.

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    Rossio

    by rcsparty Written Nov 28, 2009

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    This square has been the stage for bullfights, festivals, parades and even the burning of heretics during the inquisition. In the center is a statue of Dom Pedro IV, the first emperor of Brazil. The square was paved with patterned mosaics in the mid 19th century, of which, only the central section survives today. This is another great square to just sit an relax.

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