Fátima Local Customs

  • Fatima - Portugal
    Fatima - Portugal
    by solopes
  • Sinners or saints?
    Sinners or saints?
    by Imaniac
  • Burning a candle
    Burning a candle
    by Imaniac

Most Recent Local Customs in Fátima

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    Promises

    by solopes Updated Dec 16, 2012

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    Fatima - Portugal

    It's common in Portugal when facing dramatic situations (disease, trouble in a birth of a child, even scholar examinations) to make a promise, most of them to "Nª Srª de Fátima". And those promises generally include walking to Fatima on foot (sometimes hundreds of kilometers) or crossing the sanctuary kneeling.

    To soften those pilgrims suffering a long walkway was built in marble, and there is always someone painfully sliding on it.

    When I approached the man to ask permission to take his family photo, the deficient woman in the wheelchair had some agitation, that the kneeling woman translated - she wants to kiss you. Well, sometimes is not so difficult to bring happiness to simple people.

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    • Religious Travel

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    The 13th of the month

    by mikelisaanna Updated Jul 7, 2006

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    The 13th days of the months of May through October are Fatima's busiest days. Those were the days when the shepherd children had their visions of VIrgin Mary in 1917, and pilgrims still come to Fatima on those days every year.

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    • Religious Travel

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    Sinners

    by Imaniac Updated Apr 10, 2004
    Sinners or saints?

    People come to Fatima from all over the world, but especially from Portugal to pay for their sins. They do this by walking across the square on their knees. The distance between one end of the square and the other end is enormous, twice as big as the Vatican Square. I wouldn't want to be in their shoes (or knees). Ultimately this is what Fatima is so famous for.

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    • Religious Travel

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    ex-voto

    by call_me_rhia Written Mar 9, 2004

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    at the ex-voto shrine

    Just before rwaching the hapel of the apparitions, in the corner, there's a sort of shrine where people bring wax objects as ex-votos, to be burned. One common votive gift, beside was candles, are casts of the afflicted body part (especially hands and legs): by burning them, pilgrims request healing for that part of the body

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    Burn a candle

    by Imaniac Written Oct 26, 2003
    Burning a candle

    In catholic religions it is a custom to burn a candle for your loved ones. This is aldo the case in fatima. But instead of burning a candle you throw it into a huge open fire. Not only normal candles are burnt, but also candles in the shape of body parts. For instance you burn a candle in the shape of a leg, to pray for your mother who just had her leg broken.

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    3 Children

    by TinKan Written Mar 25, 2003

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    The 3 children

    The Blessed Virgin Mary it is said appeared six times to three shepherd children near the town of Fatima in Portugal between May 13th and October 13th 1917. Appearing to the children, she told them that she had been sent by God with a message for every man, woman and child living in our century. Coming at a time when civilization was torn apart by war and violence, she promised that Heaven would grant peace to the entire world if her requests for prayer, reparation and consecration were heard and obeyed.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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Fátima Local Customs

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