Fun things to do in Porto

  • Things to Do
    by jorgejuansanchez
  • Things to Do
    by Cristian_Uluru
  • Casa da Musica
    by Cristian_Uluru

Most Viewed Things to Do in Porto

  • Monumento ao Infante D. Henrique

    by arasnosliw Written Nov 9, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    a.k.a. Monument to the Infante D. Henrique, this statue stands in front of the old Palácio da Bolsa. This statue was erected in 1900 in memorium of Dom Henrique's 5th centennial anniversary of his death. The architect was Tomás Costa.

    The prince is depicted as a warrior pointing pointing to the sea, with two winged creatures at the base representing the triumph of the country at sea and of faith.

    sorry for the distraction!

    Was this review helpful?

  • trams

    by arasnosliw Written Nov 9, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The system of eléctricos (trams) in Porto can take you all around the city. Although Porto is a rather condensed town, it may be a good idea to ride these old-fashioned trams if you have an aversion towards hills. The trams started running in the late 1870s, and while many lines were shut down, several have been reopened in current times.

    The tram pictured here is line #1, which runs along the waterfront of the Douro.

    pardon my maluco amigo italiano in the photo

    Was this review helpful?

  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Church of St. Francis

    by magor65 Written Jul 5, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The church of St. Francis and Palacio da Bolsa (Stock Exchange) make one edifice, as the latter was built on the site of the former Franciscan monastery.
    Completed in 1425, the church of St. Francis is said to be the best example of Gothic style in Porto. What immediately draws a visitor's attention is a large rose-window in the main facade.
    But it's the Baroque interior that makes everybody gasp in amazement. Its opulence and decorative richness is suitable for a ball-room rather than a church. Almost everything drips with gold. Gilded wood covers the aisles, pillars and chapels, arches and sculptures. The clash between the wealth of the place and the vow of poverty that the Franciscans should follow, made the authorities close the church for worship. So it is more like a museum today.
    Don't miss an impressive "Tree of Jesse" carved in wood and gilded. It shows a family tree of Jesus with twelve kings of Judah. The sculpture is crowned with the figure of Mary and the Child.
    Unfortunately, taking photographs in not allowed.
    There is a small entrance fee.

    church of St. Francis
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    National Museum of Soares dos Reis

    by Oleg_D. Written Oct 3, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museum is situated in the Carrancas Palace built in the end of XVIII century. It was founded in 1833 during the Portuguese civil war of 1820-1834 between so-called liberals and absolutists. Since 1832 the former King of Portugal Pedro IV who was also former Emperor of Brasilia under the name Pedro I became the leader of liberals who won the Civil war. That’s why the tour starts from the exhibition dedicated to Don Pedro. You can see his portrait and his uniform of officer of Casadores (light infantry).
    When Portugal became the Republic then new government conducted the reform of Portuguese museums in 1911. It was decided to give this museum the name of outstanding Portuguese sculptor Antonio Suares dos Reis the author of famous statue of “The exile”. The same time museum receives some of his sculptures because according to government decision museum had to be specialized on the fine arts. That’s why now you can see there nice paintings and sculptures and also decorative arts.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod.
    Regular tickets – 5 euros.
    Open:
    Tuesday: from 14.00 to 18.00
    Wednesday through Sunday: from 10.00 to 18.00
    Closed on Mondays, 1st of January, Easter Sunday, 1st of May and 25th of December

    Pedro IV by John Simpson Uniform of Pedro IV Main staircase Soares dos Reis sculptures Count Ferreira by Antonio Soares dos Reis
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • nhcram's Profile Photo

    A Baroque Gem

    by nhcram Updated Jan 11, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This charming house used to be the home of the former poet Guerra Junqueiro. It is an 18th century baroque building and has such a peaceful feel to it. The house has a collection of the poets’ private collection of rare ceramics and furniture. Unfortunately we did not spend long in here but long enough to appreciate this gem of a house.

    In the walled garden

    Was this review helpful?

  • Folbi's Profile Photo

    Views on the old town (ribeira)

    by Folbi Updated May 8, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The best views on Porto and the Ribeira are from Vila Nova de Gaia (southbank of the Douro). From Porto, you can go there by foot across Ponte D. Luis.
    When on the northbank and walking from Castelo de Queijo (near "Parque da Citade" at seaside) to the Douro you will also be able to take a boat at some point on your way to go across on the southbank and continue your walking to Vila Nova de Gaia.

    Ribeira from Vila Nova de Gaia
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Majestic Cafe

    by suvanki Updated Jan 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This cafe was established in 1921, and still remains much as it was in those times.The Majestic was the place for artists, revolutionaries,merchants and business people to meet and chat/debate over a drink or meal. Also, it was a meeting place for society ladies to see and be seen.

    Entering from bustle of the modern pedestrianised Rua Santa Caterina , The Majestic offers a step back in time.

    Leather covered benches line the walls of this rectangular shaped cafe.
    Marble topped tables and carved wooden seats offer further seating options, to while away the time relaxing over a drink or meal.
    Old mirrors, and plaster reliefs of cherubs etc. cover the walls, and at the far end, beyond the grand piano and dark wood bar is a stained glass window, overlooking a conservatory like area, with a few potted palms. The ceiling is quite decorative too, with plaster cornices, and roses encircling the glass lamps.

    The waiters are attired in white 'uniform' jackets and black trousers, while senior staff wear black long jacket suits.
    The toilets downstairs, although maintaining an air of bygone times, are modernised with movement sensitive lighting, automatic hand dryers etc.

    Apparently this cafe fell into disrepair from 1964, but then in 1983 reopened after restoration work.

    Poetry readings, piano concerts and photography exhibitions sometimes take place here

    I only had a pot of tea (with a complimentary biscuit), and I'm afraid I didn't check out the menu too closely for food offered and prices.I did purchase some postcards depicting the cafe in olden times, and my waiter gave me an information sheet about the cafe.

    Well worth a visit!

    Majestic cafe, Porto
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • nhcram's Profile Photo

    Remains of the day

    by nhcram Written Jan 11, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the 11th and 12th century there was a medieval wall and the wall had three gates and a narrow entrance. Here are some of the remains of that wall, the rest of which probably lie beneath the houses in the area.

    Remains of the medieval wall.

    Was this review helpful?

  • IneXisTenZ's Profile Photo

    Car tour

    by IneXisTenZ Written Feb 18, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A car ride through the Alto Douro Wine Region
    When travelling by car, in order to prepare yourself for the long-awaited meeting with the river, the first thing you must do is take a deep breath and steel yourself for a journey that will take you constantly up and down hills and along narrow, winding roads.

    You will encounter pleasant peaceful towns, landscapes dominated by vineyards that follow the contours of the terrain, castles evoking the Christian Reconquest, and a never-ending series of different views over one of the world’s most breathtaking landscapes.

    Beginning your journey in Peso da Régua and passing through Pinhão, you should follow the EN 322-3, which will cross over the plateaux that protect the Douro valley, taking you on to Alijó. Then follow the route of the EN212 between Alijó and Carrazeda de Ansiães, crossing over the River Tua, and continuing along the EN214 to Vila Flor.

    Leaving Vila Flor by the IP2 to Torre de Moncorvo, you can take the EN220 and EN221 to Barca d´Alva, passing through Freixo de Espada à Cinta. From Vila Nova de Foz Côa to the River Douro, passing through São João da Pesqueira, you should then take the EN 222, which will bring you back to Pinhão. Whenever possible, allow yourself to turn off onto the minor roads in the lower-lying areas. On the left bank, there are two highly recommended detours: the EN 222-4, which takes you down the valley to the Quinta do Vesúvio, and the EN 324, which leads to the imposing castle at Numão .

    Was this review helpful?

  • IneXisTenZ's Profile Photo

    A pleasant ride by the seaside

    by IneXisTenZ Written Feb 18, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A pleasant ride by the seaside. The Tam Mseum
    Take the No. 18 tram at the stop in Rua do Carmo (near the Praça dos Leões), which will take you to the romantic Foz do Douro, situated at the point where the River Douro meets the Atlantic. On the way, you will pass the Igreja do Carmo, a church that stands out in particular because of its side wall covered with azulejos, a clear demonstration of what is a distinctly Portuguese art. After circling around the imposingly neoclassical Hospital de Santo António, the tram moves downhill towards the river. Ask for the Tram Museum (Museu do Carro Eléctrico) and make sure to visit it. It will help you to learn more about the history of this particular form of transport in Porto. Take the No. 18 tram once again and continue on to Foz. The ride along the Avenida Montevideu, offering you a sweeping view over the ocean, is an unforgettable journey at any time of the year. Pleasant-looking café terraces and restaurants follow on from one another in a long line, immediately in front of a series of small beaches. Just what you need on a summer’s day!

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Ponte Dona Maria Pia and Ponte de S Joao

    by suvanki Updated Apr 17, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Ponte Dona Maria Pia iron railway bridge was in service between 1877 and 1991. It was a single line track. Designed as a double hinged arch, pillars re-inforce the strength of the structure.

    It is considered to be the first great piece of work by Gustavo Eiffel. His bridge was started on 5th January 1876, and was completed on 31st November 1877.

    King Dom Luis and his wife Queen Dona Maria Pia (Who the bridge is named in honour of) attended the inauguration ceremony.

    The Ponte Dom Luis 1 is often mistakenly attributed to Gustavo Eiffel.

    In 1991, the Ponte S. João (S. João Bridge) replaced the Ponte Dona Maria Pia, although as you can see, it still is an interesting and aesthetically pleasing bridge!

    Edgar Cardoso designed this 20th Century railway bridge. It is a simple looking design with a portico and three arches (two measuring 125m and one of 250m), divided by supporting pillars.

    The inauguration took place on S. João Day - which was on 24 July 1991.

    Ponte Dona Maria Pia  and Ponte de S Joao Ponte Dona Maria Pia Ponte de S Joao and Ponte Dona Maria Pia
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Beaches

    by antistar Written Aug 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anyone wanting to swim in the Atlantic ocean should go to the Algarve, or at the very least move 20km south of Porto to Espinho. Porto's beaches look wonderful, but are cursed by the proximity of the great Matosinho port.

    Beaches, Porto

    Was this review helpful?

  • portgrl's Profile Photo

    Tait House

    by portgrl Updated Jun 3, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tait House, is a space of rare beauty, landscaped green area, in the central zone of the City of O' Porto. Protected for high walls, the Tait House still keeps a deep characteristic mark of the English families who had inhabited it.

    Between many it is to detach who gave the name to it, William Tait, British citizen, owner and inhabitant in this house from 22 of April of 1900, supplied, on trader to the wine of O' Porto, becoming excellent person of the time, studious that it was of the fauna and flora, and author of The Birds of Portugal - London 1924.

    Belonging to the Porto City Council it contains one of the most notable and complete numismatics collections,playing an important role in the study of Greek, Hispanic, Arabian and Portuguese numismatics.

    This is without doubts a place of obligator sight for the apreciadores of the magical symbiosis of the green, the water and pleasent sunset.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Folbi's Profile Photo

    Placa Da Liberdade

    by Folbi Updated May 8, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Really nice place in the heart of the city center. A little bit spoiled by the road works and the work for the underground but when you first arrive to Porto from the airport that's where the AeroBus stops and it leaves you with a nice first impression of Porto (and not the last).

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Igreja dos Clerigos

    by antistar Updated Dec 15, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This small oval church is set directly under the Torres dos Clerigos and was built by the same architect. The most impressive part of the church is the marble retable, the structure behind the altar (pictured). You can also get great views of the busy Rua dos Clerigos from the front of the church, staring down the hill at all the busy shoppers.

    Entry is free.

    Retable, Igreja dos Clerigos, Porto

    Was this review helpful?

Porto Hotels

See all 67 Hotels in Porto

Latest Porto Hotel Reviews

Eurostars Das Artes Hotel
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Dom Henrique Hotel
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
HF Fenix Porto
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Albergaria Miradouro
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
HF Ipanema Park
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 3 Reviews
Tivoli Porto Hotel
2 Reviews
Beta Porto Hotel
Bad (2.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Ipanema Porto
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Hotel Tryp Porto Centro
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Residencial Pao de Acucar
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Gaia Hotel
1 Review

Instant Answers: Porto

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

29 travelers online now

Comments

Porto Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Porto locals.
Map of Porto