Unique Places in Portugal

  • Nazare's North Beach
    Nazare's North Beach
    by HORSCHECK
  • Casa de Ramalde - Porto
    Casa de Ramalde - Porto
    by solopes
  • Parque Dr. Manuel Braga (Coimbra, Portugal)
    Parque Dr. Manuel Braga (Coimbra,...
    by Redang

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Portugal

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    Quinta de Aveleda.

    by cachaseiro Written Oct 23, 2012

    Quinta de Aveleda is is the biggest producer of vinho verde in Portugal and a place that has a very nice manor house with a huge garden that is very nice too.
    They also have a shop there where they sell their wines aswell as other portuguese specialities.
    You can have tastings there too if you book in advance.

    Quinta de Aveleda is located in a town called Penafiel which is a little north East of Porto in the northern part of the country.

    Quinta de Aveleda. Quinta de Aveleda. From the garden at Quinta de Aveleda. The old gate at Quinta de Aveleda. The goathouse at Quinta de Aveleda.
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    Estação de São Bento in Porto

    by Paul2001 Written Oct 19, 2012

    The Estação de São Bento is a small but stunning railway station that is essentially a suburban train station for the city of Porto. It is remarkable for the fine azulejo (blue tiles) panels that adorn the walls of the station. For many including me, this is the first attration one might come across when arriving in Porto. The station itself is where you pick up trains to nearby cities like Braga and for the Duoro Valley.
    The station was opened in 1916. The Azulejo panels are the creation of Jorge Colaco who was the most important azulejo creator in Portugal at that time. There are more that 20,000 tiles here. Don't be in a hurry and rush through this place on the way to your hotel. Instead spend sometime gazing at these works.

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    Chaves.

    by cachaseiro Written Oct 15, 2012

    Chaves is way up in the very north of Portugal right by to the Spanish border.
    It's a town with quite a bit of roman influence including old roman baths and an old roman bridge over the river.
    It has a very pretty old towncenter with traditional stone houses that has wooden balconies which is something that you only see in very few towns in Portugal.
    Chaves has two old castles right in the center of town, one of them turned in to a military museum.
    The town is really pleasant and is quite green aswell with nice parks and walkways and it's a good place to hike and bike.

    Chaves. Street in Chaves. Traditional houses in chaves. The townhall in Chaves.
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    The Citadel of Cascais

    by traveldave Updated Aug 6, 2012

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    The Citadel of Cascais comprises the Fort of Nossa Senhora da Luz de Cascais and the Tower of Santo António Cascais. It was constructed by King João IV in 1488 as a small fortress that was part of a defensive line of fortresses on the right bank of the Tagus River that protected the sea approaches to Lisbon.

    In 1580, Spanish forces led by the Duke of Alba took the fortress, which led to the union of the Portuguese and Spanish crowns. In the late sixteenth century, the fortress was enlarged by King Felipe I of Spain, turning it into a citadel and giving it its present low profile and star-shaped floor plan.

    The citadel was converted into a summer palace by King Luís I in 1870, and it was used as a royal summer residence up until 1908. King Carlos I had an interest in marine biology, and installed Portugal's first oceanographic laboratory in the citadel in 1896. Nowadays part of the Citadel of Cascais serves as the summer residence of the Portuguese president.

    The Citadel of Cascais is located in the center of Cascais, just to the southwest of the Largo 5 de Outubro. A fine example of an early Portuguese fortress, the citadel is one of the town's most popular tourist attractions.

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    Madeira.

    by cachaseiro Written Feb 12, 2012

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    Madeira is located well off the coast of Portugal and has a nature that is very diverse from the mainland because of it´s vulcanic origin.
    It´s an island that rises up to almost 2000 meters above sealevel and has some of the most dramatic nature in europe and because of that it is very popular with hikers from around the world who come there to hike the famous levadas.

    Madeira has also been a favorite for the rich for many years.
    The british upperclass has taken a particular liking to the island and the place is full of 4 and 5 star hotels and it´s not a discount island that is for sure.

    Madeira is connected to the world with many flights so should you want to visit then you can easily get there from the portugese mainland aswell as from most western european countries.

    Madeira Island. Camara dos lobos on Madeira. Coastal path om Madeira. Madeira. Madeira.
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    Lamego.

    by cachaseiro Written Jun 7, 2011

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    Lamego is located around 10 kilometers south of the Douro river and it´s a bustling university town that is best known for the pilgrim site calles "Nossa senhora dos remedios" which is on top of a mountain that can be reached by climbing a very impressive baroque stairway that has several hundred steps.
    Apart from being a impressive monument you have a really good view from the top of there and the view itself is enough reason to pay a visit to Lamego if you are in the region.

    Nossa senhora dos remedios at Lamego.
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    Estremoz.

    by cachaseiro Written Jun 7, 2011

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    Estremoz is in northern Alentejo and not the most obvious place to stop, but the town has quite a bit of charm and it´s famous for being the capital of marble in Portugal as there is a huge amount of marble in the area.
    Even some of the cobblestones in Estremoz are made of marble and it´´s a lively town with some decent shopping and quite a few nice little cafes if you just happen to stop there while on the way to another town and just want to stop there for a snack and a quick visit.

    Estremoz.
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    Marvao.

    by cachaseiro Updated Jun 7, 2011

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    Marvao is a gorgeous little town right by the spanish border in northern Alentejo.
    It´s an old fortified town that has seen many battles over the years, mostly with the spanish, but these days it´s a peaceful little town with narrow winding streets and great views.
    This is not the kinda town you come to that easily, but if you have the chance to go there then you really should.
    The place is lovely.

    Marvao. Marvao.
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    Castelo de Vide.

    by cachaseiro Written Jun 6, 2011

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    Castelo de Vide is quite off the beaten track very near the spanish border.
    It´s a very prety and interesting town though that used to be the enter of the jewish community in Portugal and it is also the birthplace os Salgeiro Maio who was one of the young captains from the portugese armey that was behind the peaceful revolution in 1974.

    Castelo de Vide is situated on a mountain top and has a castle residing on top of town and the streets and narrow and winding and the town is a real treat to visit.
    You have various types of acomodation there, so you can stay overnight in town if you feel like and i would recommend that.

    Castelo de Vide. Statue of Salgueiro Maio in Castelo de Vide. Castelo de Vide.
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    Café Majestic in Oporto

    by jorgejuansanchez Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is a lovely Art Deco café from the Belle Epoque. One of the three remaining cafes of its kind in Europe after Prague and Budapest (the one in Paris does not exist anymore). It is in downtown. Just for curiosity you should visit it and order a cup of tea to appreciate its charm. It was a meeting point of poets and artists in the twenties of the XX century.

    Rua de Santa Catarina 112

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    Montemor - o - novo

    by salinhopt Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Montemor-o-Novo has constructed the future anchored in its historical, rich past of memories. There it cements its identity and it is clear its force and difference face to all the other places of the World. An identity that affirms its presence in the Alentejo, region where the Man molded and knew to keep in long of the times a "language", a culture, an architecture, only in the country and the Europe. Another world, another rhythm.

    Portugal - Montemor - o - Novo

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    Alandroal

    by salinhopt Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The beautiful Arabic sounding name of Alandroal betrays the town's cultural roots. Its origins are proudly emblazoned on the city coat of arms, which shows that it belongs to the Order of Aviz. You may like to take a walk from the hill fort of Castelo Velho through the historical center of Terena to the ruins of the Castle of Juromenha. If your visit coincides with the first Sunday after Easter, you should stop to see the festival of Nossa Senhora da Boa Nova at the sanctuary of the same name

    Portugal - Alandroal castle

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    Coimbra

    by traveldave Updated Nov 21, 2010

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    Portugal's third-largest city after Lisbon and Porto, Coimbra has about 430,000 inhabitants in its metropolitan area. The city was founded on a hill overlooking the Mondego River, and the impressive historical buildings on the hill's summit form a skyline that is an iconic symbol of the city.

    The area that would one day become Coimbra was first settled by Germanic peoples from about 465 to 468 A.D. The Romans occupied the area from 586 to 640 A.D., but the town never prospered under their rule, nor did they leave any significant monuments. The town only began to flourish under the Moors, who moved into the area in 711 A.D. It became a trading center between the Muslim south and the Christian north. The Moors called the settlement Qulumriyah, which was eventually corrupted by the Portuguese into Coimbra.

    The town was taken from the Moors by Ferdinand the Great in 1064. The first king of Portugal, King Alfonso Henriques later moved his capital from Guimarães to Coimbra, which served as the nation's capital until 1255.

    During the Middle Ages, the city was divided between the upper city, or Cidade Alta, and the lower city, or Cidade Baixa. The aristocracy and members of the clergy lived in Cidade Alta, and Cidade Baixa was the home of the lower classes and the center of trade and commerce. Nowadays, Cidade Alta contains most of the city's great buildings and monuments, and Cidade Baixa is characterized by narrow, cobbled streets.

    Coimbra is also home to Portugal's largest and oldest university. The University of Coimbra was founded in 1290, but was not permanently established in Coimbra until 1537. It is one of the oldest universities in Europe, and is the oldest university in the Portuguese-speaking world. The university is located on a hill overlooking Coimbra, and forms a distinctive part of the city's skyline.

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    Cascais

    by traveldave Updated Nov 19, 2010

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    Like its neighbor, Estoril, Cascais is popular with the young international crowd. The town became a fashionable resort in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when King Luís I moved his summer palace there. The royal presence attracted members of the Portuguese aristocracy, who built magnificent vacation villas in the surrounding hills, transforming the town into a resort area. Nowadays, fashionable shops and restaurants line the pedestrian streets of the town.

    Cascais is about 19 miles (30 kilometers) from Lisbon, and is part of that city's greater metropolitan area. It is home to many members of the Portuguese monied elite, and is therefore one of the richest municipalities in the country.

    Cascais was first settled in the twelfth century, at which time it became an important fishing port. During the Middle Ages, the town benefitted from maritime commerce, since it was a port of call for ships on their way to Lisbon. At the same time, the Cascais area was a center for agriculture, producing wine, olive oil, grains, and fruits.

    In 1488, King João II built a fortress on the town's harbor as part of a defensive line of fortresses protecting the sea approaches to Lisbon. It was taken by Spanish forces in 1580, which led to the union of the Portuguese and Spanish crowns. The fortress and town were also occupied by the French during Napolean's invasion of Portugal in 1807.

    The fortress was converted into a royal summer residence by King Luís I in 1870. Because of the royal presence, many improvements to the basic infrastructure of Cascais were carried out, including construction of better roads to Lisbon and Sintra, and the building of a casino and bullring. Cascais was also the first town in Portugal to have electric lights.

    The town's main square (pictured here) is the Largo 5 de Outubro.

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    Estoril

    by traveldave Updated Nov 19, 2010

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    The resort town of Estoril is located about 18 miles (29 kilometers) west of Lisbon, near the mouth of the Tagus River on the Atlantic coast. Its casino and cultural and sporting events attract visitors from all over the world.

    The area that would one day become Estoril was first inhabited by the Phoenicians. They were followed by the Romans who settled in the area around 2,000 years ago, and then the Moors occupied the town until they were expelled during the reconquest in the twelfth century.

    In the centuries that followed, Estoril became a major fishing port. However, it was a sleepy village with little or no recognition from the outside world. Estoril first became popular at the turn of the twentieth century for its therapeutic spring waters. And in the years before the Second World War, businessman Fausto Cardoso de Figueiredo and his partner Augusto Carreira de Sousa built the Casino Estoril and developed the town into a seaside resort.

    During the Second World War, Allied and Axis spies were drawn to neutral Portugal. They engaged in international espionage and secret diplomacy. This brought about an atmosphere of intrigue and mystery to the town. The war caused the downfall of most of Europe's monarchies, and Estoril became a place of exile for many European kings and aristocrats, among them Miklós Horthy, the regent of Hungary; King Juan Carlos I of Spain; and King Carol II of Romania. The presence of royalty and aristocracy set the stage for the town's current sophistication and cosmopolitanism.

    Nowadays, Estoril is a seaside playground for Portugal's elite and the international jet set. International cultural and sporting events attract visitors from all over the world. Some of the major events staged in Estoril include the Estoril Fashion Festival, the Estoril Open de Portugal (tennis), the Estoril Circuit (motorsports), the Audi Med Cup (sailing), the Estoril Surf Girls (women's surfing), the Estoril Golf Open, and the International Lusitano Horse Fair.

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Portugal Off The Beaten Path

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