Madeira Island Local Customs

  • Carneval in Madeira.
    Carneval in Madeira.
    by cachaseiro
  • Preparing for carneval in Madeira.
    Preparing for carneval in Madeira.
    by cachaseiro
  • Carneval in Madeira.
    Carneval in Madeira.
    by cachaseiro

Best Rated Local Customs in Madeira Island

  • pikuu's Profile Photo

    yummy Milho Frito

    by pikuu Written Oct 30, 2006

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    Milho Frito

    This simple dish is one of my best Madeira tradition discoveries. English translation is fried corn. But it has no connection with corn-cob, seeds or popcorn.

    Milho Frito is the collection of small cubes prepared from corn-flour and ingredients and fried in deep oil or olive. Crispy outside and soft inside this is a good companion for meat or fishes. I like it very very much with tuna steak.

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    Azulejos

    by sachara Updated Mar 10, 2005

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    entrance airport

    Azulejos are the painted tiles, which tell a story. Several tiles are combined to a complete motif in a tableau. The colours are mostly blue and white.

    Everywhere at Madeira island you can discover these azulejos, at benches, fountains, public buildings, churches. Even in the airport, entering the building, in the corridor from the platform to the luggage hall, the first you see are these striking azulejos.

    The art of making and painting tiles came originally from Rome and Byzantium.

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    Camacha

    by sandysmith Written Nov 7, 2003

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    basket weaver at work

    The small village of Camacha is just a few kilometres above the city of Funchal and is known as the Maderian capital of culture being the centre of its willow craft industry.
    The village itself is small - two churches one modern, one traditional - so most people just come to see the basket weaving workshop and buy some of its produce in the large touristic shop here. The workshop is in the basement here.

    If coming independently here (rather than on a tour) I would recommend the levada walk to the Jasmin Tea House - allow abou 2-3 hours for this.

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    Get ahead get a hat!

    by sandysmith Updated Oct 30, 2003

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    is it a tea cosy!

    Well according to my Madeira guidebook to blend in like the locals these hats are the thing to wear. Well I reckon I just look daft ;-0
    Don't know why the locals need to wear these hats to keep their ears warm when the climate is warm all year round - would have thought it was more suitable to Tibetans!

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  • pikuu's Profile Photo

    Poncha da Madeira - memories on your tongue

    by pikuu Updated Oct 28, 2006

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    The Madeira resident & Poncha fan:)

    Writing about great products of Madeira soil (like: wine, liquers, banana or mango) I promised the recipe for home-made Poncha da Madeira.

    You need:
    - one measure of alcohol called "aguardente" which is white wodka made from sugar cane
    - a little of sugar cane honey (specific kind of honey, different than 'normal')
    - fresh lemon juice nad orange juice (roughly 2-3 lemon to 1 orange measure)
    Stir it and stir and stir again....
    And you have you own Poncha. Particular proportions are secret of every producer. So you can try and find you own golden mean.

    The taste is excellent. You can drink the chilled in the hot-time or 'normal temperature' during the awful autumn.
    Salud!!

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    Arraiais

    by salinhopt Written Sep 30, 2003

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    Madeira Island - Arraial do Monte

    To enjoy the Madeirense favourite weekend activity you must find a suitable arraial, which occur every weekend throughout the summer. Passear means to meander. Arraiais are the place to hangout with a cool Coral beer and maybe eat some chicken or espetada. Nothing really much happens at a arraial but there is plenty of noise and walking about. There are local arraiais, traditional music, live rock bands and municipal bands. Listen out at midday on Saturday and you will hear, and maybe see, the fireworks that announce where the arraial will be held.

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    Azulejos

    by Travelchili Written Sep 14, 2003

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    Azulejo

    Azulejos are Portuguese glazed tiles that are used to decorate places like outside of houses, walls and churches. The one on the picture was taken on a small town market -- on the left they were selling meat and on the right fish. Just keep your eyes open for them!

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    Another azulejo

    by Travelchili Written Sep 14, 2003

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    Azulejo

    * The craft was brought over by the Moors already in the eigth century.
    * The world 'azulejo' comes from an Arabic word, which means 'small stone'.
    * The azulejo on the photo was on the wall of a big fish market in Funchal. It was a great place to visit, so add it to your 'must-see' list when you visit Madeira.

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    Madeira Wine Festival

    by Travelchili Updated Sep 15, 2003

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    A 'small' wine bottle

    The wine harvest in Madeira takes place over the first weekend in September and it is celebrated with bare-foot wine treading and folk dancing in Estreito de Camara de Lobos. It is a wonderful experience, so watch out for it if you happen to visit Madeira in September. In addition to celebrations in Estreito de Camara de Lobos, you can see special shows, exhibitions and celebrations in Funchal as well, even though you won't see the bare-foot wine treading like you would in Camara de Lobos.

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  • myriam_c's Profile Photo

    Have some madeira m'dear ...

    by myriam_c Written Apr 29, 2003

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    Madeira wine

    The national drink on the island is madeira wine. Madeira wine ows its rich taste to the variety of grapes that is used.
    The four importants varieties of Madeira wine have been named after their grape variety:
    SERCIAL: amber colored dry madeira wine (seco)
    VERDELHO: yellow-brown medium dry madeira wine (meio seco)
    BOAL: reddish-brown medium sweet madeira wine (meio doce)
    MALMSEY: sweet madeira wine (doce).
    Boal is my personal favorite.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Carneval in Madeira.

    by cachaseiro Written Mar 7, 2012

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    Carneval in Madeira.
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    Madeira has a quite big carneval that is celebrated the same time as the carneval in Brazil which is the weekend after ash wedensday.
    The carneval in Madeira is quite similar to the one in Rio and they have samba schools competing aswell as many other parties around town during the week.
    I have experienced it once and was quite impressed by the size of it and there is sure some similarity to the famous one in Brazil which i have experienced aswell.

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    Banana Trees

    by MarioPortugal Updated Jun 3, 2007

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    Banana Trees are grown in Madeira and I must confess that those orchards are interesting to see for a European mainlander like me :)

    If I'm not mistaken, the Madeira Island is the only place of the Portuguese territory where Bananas are grown.

    The Bananas from Madeira are smaller in size but more flavour than the ones one usually find at the mainland supermarkets.

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    Santana - Festival of traditional song and dance

    by Jerelis Updated Feb 28, 2004

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    The town's parish church of 1698.

    Each July a large festival of traditional song and dance is held in the village and draws large crowds of locals and tourists alike. During ou walk through the town we ended up at a nice little park in the centre of the town with the town's parish church. This church was built in 1698 and features impressive retables to the two side altars. We also liked the fact that this church was richly ornamented.

    Santana is also known for its enormous amount of local flowers. The town is beautifully situated at the nort east side of the island. Many peole use it as a starting point for one of Madeira's most spectacular Levada Walks towards "Calderão Verde" (the Green Cauldron) and Pico Ruivo (1861 m), the highest peak of the island.

    Address:
    The village of Santana

    Directions:
    The village is situated at the north east coast of the islans, just a few hundred meters away from the ocean. It's a 39 km drive from the capital of Madeira, Funchal.

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    Santana - Named after St. Anne.

    by Jerelis Updated Feb 28, 2004

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    One of the many Casas de Colmo.
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    Named after St. Anne, mother of the Virgin Mary, Santana is a village of hedgerows and flowers on the north eastern side of Madeira Ilsand. Complete with waterfalls, cobble-stoned streets, luch green meadows and plunging ravines, it is maybe one of the most picturesque and caracteristic villages in Europe.

    Address:
    The village of Santana

    Directions:
    The village is situated at the north east coast of the islans, just a few hundred meters away from the ocean. It's a 39 km drive from the capital of Madeira, Funchal.

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    AZULEJOS - BLUE PORTUGUESE TILES

    by Sininen Updated Jan 22, 2006

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    1 more image

    Like in he mainland Portugal you can see blue tiles everywhere. They can be decorative like the well in the photo or tell a whole story like the tiles on the wall of the market.

    Portugese tiles, which are known as azulejos, are not orginally a Portugues invention but brought by the Moors. In the 16th century Portuguese and Flemmish arstists began to produce blue and yellow tiles, which pictures mainly flowers and religious patterns, but as the Portuguese empire expanded the exotic themes appeared on the tiles as well. By the end of the 17th century blue tiles became popular, probably influence of the Chinese blue and white porcelain, which was imported to Europe.

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Madeira Island Local Customs

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