Budva Favorites

  • Monument
    Monument
    by Odiseya
  • Cave behind Monastery Stanjevići
    Cave behind Monastery Stanjevići
    by Odiseya
  • Cave behind Monastery Stanjevići
    Cave behind Monastery Stanjevići
    by Odiseya

Best Rated Favorites in Budva

  • yumyum's Profile Photo

    Beaches

    by yumyum Updated Sep 11, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    big beach
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: As in all Montenegrin towns there are organised public beaches where there is a stretch of beach where you can hire sunbeds and sun umbrellas and on the other half you may just lay down your towel.

    There are beaches behind old town which are very popular. Mind you to reach the second and third beach you need to take the path along the rockface.

    Then there is the big beach. First coming from the old town there is the yacht harbour where you may see some pretty fancy yachts, then come various organised beaches with restaurants and other attractions along the promenade right above the beach. There is a second promenade a few meters further inland with lots of stalls/little shops, nightclubs/bars, openair internet cafe etc.

    There is a lot of construction of new buildings going on. So apart from the old town, Budva itself is not terribly pretty.

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    A view through the niche

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: "The collapse of the Roman Empire was followed by a period of Byzantine domination in 535, and after this begins the struggle agains foreign rule. The consolidation and rise of the Nemanjic dynasty, as well as the state of raska, meant the end of Byzantine rule on the coast. Stevan Nemanja wrested Budva from Byzantim in 1184-1186. After 1392-1396, Budva was controlled by the Crnojevic family, originating from the Montenegrin highlands. Already evident at the time were Venetian ambitions, vigorously opposed by Balsa III. In vain, however, for under constant pressure from Venice, Budva and it's surroundings came under Venetian rule in 1442."

    www.budva.cg.yu

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Churches

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: "The people of the Budva region, exhausted by foreign rule and the defiance of hated rulers, both Venetians and Turks, once again had to gather strenght for the fight for freedom. Now the people opposed a new master, the French, who seized Budva in 1807. after the Treaty of Tilsit.After Napoleon's downfall in 1813. hope flickered anew on the sombre horizons of this region. Unfortuna tely not for long, for already in 1814. Budva and its environs came under Austrian rule. The century of Austrian occupation had unforeseeable consequences that destroyed much and blocked the development of the region."

    www.budva.cg.yu

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Mediterranean

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: Budva is a typical Mediterranean city with stone houses, narrow streets, palms and oleanders, and all that scent of the sea, picturesque windows and plants climbing up the walls, cats lurking from around the corner and the smell of the grilled fish...

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Budva Symbol

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: This is the symbol of Budva. It is carved into the walls of the citadel, facing the sea and it says BUDVA ~ MARE ADRIATICO (It means Adriatic Sea in Italian). Italians had a controld over the coast for a certain period of time and a lot of Montenegrins speak Italian still, also because of the Italian tourists :))

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Slovenska plaza

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Slovenska plaza is the main beach of Budva, outside the old town, and it stretches along entire city coast. There is a huge hotel complex of Slovenska plaza, and a very long promenade full of funny stuff along the beach. In te summer it can be a mess to be around!

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Mogren beaches

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: These two beaches stretch out from cape Mogren until hotel Avala. They are among the most attractive and most beauiful beaches.
    It has a very fine quality of sand, not powder alike, but not the pebbles either, and wonderful vegetation behind! A lot of thick pine forests! The only way to access these beaches is passing through hotel complex Avala, and it's sort of exclusive... It is about 100-200m away from the old town.
    Mogren beaches are situated in two sandy coves connected with a natural tunnel through the rocks. On the first one there is an open air bar/club.
    The name comes from the Spanish sailor Mogrini who sufferred a shipwreck and arrived to one of the Mogren beaches. As a sign of his gratitude he build St.Antun church.

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Sea & Stone

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: Budva is a very old town, over 2500 years of civilization!
    "he region where venerable Budva and it's earliest inhabitants, the enchelei, were first cited, is closely connected with the fate of a famous mortal, Cadmus, founder of Thebes in Boeothia, who came from Phoenicia to Greece several generations before the beginbibg of the Trojan War. This fortunate soul, whom the gods had given as spouse, Harmonia, blond daughter of Aphrodite and Ares, left thebes in his old age and settled among the Enchelei, founded Budva, defeated
    the neighbouring Illyrians and spent the rest of his life together with his wife in this distant, foregin land. Even Sophocles mentions Budva in his tragedy "Oicles", written in 5th century BC. Trapped in the web of Roman politics, Teuta's heirs managed to preserve a certain amount of independence for another fifty years, but in 168 B.C. when Genthius openly opposed the Romans, the Illyrian state finally fell."

    www.budva.cg.yu

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Barred

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: "Stefan Mitrov Ljubisa is doubtless Budva's best known son. He is one of the finest short story writers in the Serbian laungage. It's nice to be able to see in Budva the birthplaces of Stefan Count Zanovic, Krsto Ivanovic (1628-1688), poet, theatre chronicler, in whose person, like John Donne, spoke both priest and writer, who even tried his hand at melodrama. Towards the end of the last century in this region the first generation of domestic painters appeared, representing at the same time Montenegro's first trained artists. This generation included Anastas and Spiro Bocaric and a painter from Petrovac, Marko Gregovic."

    www.budva.cg.yu

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    St. John

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: In the back you can see the church of Sv.Jovan (St. John), catholic church.
    It is not clear when the church was built, it is believed in 7th century. Its appearance and condition today are probably the result of renovation after the great earthquake.

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Cats

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: Budva is full of cats, but sometimes they can be really funny. This one was standing like a statue here on the stone in the garden, and NOT MOVING!!! He was just blinking and staring at us. 2,5 hours later, after we've made our stroll around the old town, we appeared at the same point, and there he was, the big cat, still standing in the same position! :)

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    The Port

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Budva is a big port as well, full of all kinds of boats, from old, small fishermen barges to pompous enormous yachts. But most of the time average size boats and sailboats are anchored in the port. It's nice to take a walk at the dock in the evening and watch them...

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    A path to nowhere

    by Aurorae Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva by Jelena

    Favorite thing: Or just a visual effect? :) It was taken on the top of the citadela complex, it gives the impression like the road is cut off right there and there is an abyss to the sea. There are a lot of paths like this around Budva old town. Lose yourself inside.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Sveti Stefan

    by JLBG Updated Oct 27, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This view of Sveti Stefan seen from the coastal road is worldwide known. Let me remind anyway that Sveti Stefan is an ancient fishermen village built on a round peninsula, at the end of a very narrow isthmus. In the 60s, it was turned a luxurious hotel which soon got prestigious visitors in spite of (because of ?) the price of the night, going as high as 1,500 euros for the famous villa 118. As the whole Montenegrin littoral, for more than a decade, it was almost abandoned by its western visitors. Only in the last couple of years they began to come back. You have to pay 6 euros to visit the island-hotel. We will do it next time.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Kosma&#269 fortress

    by JLBG Updated Oct 2, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The ruined Austro-Hungarian fortress of Kosmač stands on a rock, 10 km after Boreti, on the road to Cetinje. I do not know if it can be visited. The fortress itself may not be of special interest but the view on the seashore must be stunning. Next time, I will take a closer look to get there.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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