Budva Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Vanity666
  • Things to Do
    by Vanity666
  • Things to Do
    by Vanity666

Most Recent Things to Do in Budva

  • Zvrlj's Profile Photo

    Crkva Svetog Ivana | Church of St John (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated May 26, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Church of St John
    1 more image

    Church Cathedral of St John was erected in 7th century and the belltower – in 1867. There are a lot of valuable artworks in it, among them the best known is icon of God Mother with Christ called "Budva Mother of God".

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Zvrlj's Profile Photo

    Stari grad | Budva Old Town (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated May 25, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva Old Town

    Budva Old Town is located on rocky peninsula, and there are archeological evidence that there was settlement on the very same place even before Greek colonization of Adriatic coast. This place was first settled by Illyrian tribe of Enchelei, then by Greeks, Romans, Slavic tribes, Turks, Venetians… Today, look of the Old Town is mostly from medieval times. Inside defensive walls there is labyrinth of narrow streets, piazzetas, stone facades, sheer stairs, Roman and Hellenic remains… Town fortress – Citadel was built in 16th century on the foundations of an older fortification, and previously on that place was Greek Acropolis. There are four sacral buildings by Citadel walls: Santa Maria in Punta, Crkva Svetog Save – St Sava Church, Crkva Svetog Ivana – Church Cathedral of St John, and Crkva Svete Trojice – Holy Trinity Church. There are Archeological Museum, Modern Gallery in Old Town, but many cafes, restaurants, shops… too.

    Budva Old Town is unique and unforgettable place, especially if it can be seen out of summer season and crowds it brings.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Zvrlj's Profile Photo

    Arheoloski muzej | Archeological Museum (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated May 25, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Archeologic Museum
    1 more image

    Although the sea, beach and sun prevent most of the thoughts about history, archeology, museums (and spending time in them)… the Archeological Museum in Budva is worthy of spending one afternoon off the beach. At least.

    Museum offers journey through Budva history, from 5th century BC – when Budva, settled by Illyrian tribe of Enchelei, was mentioned for the first time as Buthoe, by ancient writer Sophocles – to 19th century.

    The oldest exhibit in Museum is Illyrian bronze helmet dated in 5th century BC. There are several ceramic vases and vessels from Hellenistic period (4th – 2nd century BC), Roman pottery and glass, tombstones and urns (1st – 3rd century AD)… There are impressive pieces of silver, gold and amber jewelry, found in Budva necropolis and made in period 3rd – 1st century BC… This, archeological collection, is exhibited on 1st, 2nd and 3rd floor of the Museum.

    There are parts of the naval equipment, traditional costumes, furniture, arms… (19th century) at the exhibition of ethnological and cultural heritage of Budva, on the 4th floor of the Museum.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Church of the Holy Trinity/Sv Trojica

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The central point of the southern end of the Old Town is the Holy Trinity Church which separates Trg Izmedu Crkava and Starogradski Trg. The beautifully restored Orthodox Church is crowned with the three bells feature common on so many Orthodox churches. Over the main door is a beautiful coloured mosaic. The church was originally built in 1804 but like most other buildings in Budva was damaged badly by an earthquake.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Stari Bar

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The city of Bar itself wasn’t impressive enough for us to warrant a night or two’s stay but the Old Town of Bar located around 5km northeast of the newer and industrialised modern city of Bar was high on our Montenegrin ‘must see’ list Stari Bar can be easily visited from Budva either independently using public transport or by taking an organised tour.
    The walled city was severely damaged by an earthquake but a lot of funding has been injected into its restoration which although not fully complete, has been undertaken with extreme care and sensitivity. During the summer the Old Town is overrun with tour groups and other day-trippers but when we visited early one April morning we had the place entirely to ourselves.
    The overgrown streets and cobbled paths of the Old Town are filled with the ruins of centuries old fortresses, churches and towers, the most impressive of which are the 11th century hill top fortress, the 14th century Churches of St. Veneranda and St. Catherine, Turkish era bath and ruins of the Church of St. Nicholas. An old Olive Tree, which locals proudly claim to be over 2000 years old is also located nearby. Aside from the ancient sights scattered all over the Stari Bar, the views over the surrounding countryside, along the coast and across to the surrounding mountains are beautiful, especially on a clear morning.
    You can reach Stari Bar by organised tour or buses to Ulcinj and other destinations south of Bar will let you off at the road to Stari Bar (5-10 mins walk from the main road) Remeber Stari Bar is about 5km away from the modern city of Bar

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Cetinje

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Podgorica may be the official capital of newly independent Montenegro but Cetinje is the historical and spiritual capital of the country. Cetinje is an easy side step from Budva with regular buses taking you from between the two towns in about half an hour. The journey itself is one of the highlights of a trip to Cetinje as the road snakes up over the mountains offering stunning views over Budva and the Montenegrin coastline.
    On first impressions Cetinje seems like a forgotten city and the past glory of the former capital has given way to a small town atmosphere but scratch beneath the surface and Cetinje’s old importance and significance becomes apparent. Many splendid stately mansions and elegant former embassies are scattered all over the city and while most have long since been abandoned, some have fallen into disrepair, their former splendour is very evident. Many of Montenegro’s most important museums and Galleries are located in Cetinje, including The State Museum, National Historical Museum and Art Gallery of Montenegro. The peaceful Cetinje Monastery is also well worth a look and a short hike up the hill beside the Monastery brings you to the Eagle’s Crag, crowned by a monument to Bishop Danilo. The views from the top out over Cetinje and the surrounding mountainous landscape are stunning. Cetinje is also a great access point to Lovcen National Park and Mausoleum of Peter II Petrovic Njegos in the centre of the park.
    Printed timetables for buses to Cetinje are hard to obtain but there are lots of buses leaving from Budva’s bus station to Cetinje. Most Podgorica bound buses also stop at Cetinje.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Marina

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Directly outside the Old Town walls, is the town’s marina, with a capacity for around 400 yachts. The marina is filled with yachts and boats of varying degrees of luxury. The marina has been the centre of recent controversy as plans have been approved to extend the marina and built another one at St. Nikola Island. It seems that the Montenegrin tourist board are really making a push to attract a more wealthy class of visitor to the Montenegrin Riviera! I just hope it won’t be to the further detriment of the coasts natural beauty :(

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Slovenska Obala

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The promenade which runs all the way from the marina and Old Town aong the sea shore is known as Slovenska Obala and is filled with bars, cafes and restaurants as well as tacky souvenir kiosks and trip and tour booking offices. Development of this promising area could have been controlled so much better but over-development and poor planning has resulted in a less than impressive water front which is a little depressing in parts, especially in the low season. While there are a few good looking eating establishments, the overall atmosphere of the promenade is tacky and a little run-down. It’s a real shame because it could be developed into a really pretty sea front area.
    Having said all that, it was the low season when we visited (April) and to be fair, a lot of seaside resort towns and cities take on that neglected, run-down appearance between October and May, so perhaps the promenade is prettier and more inspiring during the summer season.

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Budva Beach

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budva has recently gained a reputation for great value sun holidays and with this reputation has come the sort of high rise apartment and hotel development. While this impacts greatly on the beauty of the town of Budva, there is no escaping the fact that any place with a beach as beautiful as Budva is going to escape this sort of development for long.
    Budva posseses several small beaches but most of the small beaches are pebbly. For soft white sand, perfect for lying out in the Montenegrin sun, you will need to head east from the Old Town to the sandy stretch of beach running alongside Slovenska Obala. The white sand and turquoise waters make it a perfect place for sunbathing and swimming although we found the water a little cold in April, even if the overall weather temperature was very warm.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Sveti Stefan

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Sveti Stefan is less than 5km from Budva and has become one of Montenegro’s most iconic symbols. This small former fishing village dates from the 15th century and is built on a rocky crag protruding fromm the blue waters of the Adriatic and is connected to the mainland by a narrow isthmus. This isthmus is a permanent and artificially built link to the mainland, but originally the village was not connected to the mainland and access was by boat only.
    In the 1950’s the island village was completely bought and turned into a luxury hotel. The hotel grew in reputation and many celebrities stayed there over the years. In the latter half of the 20th century the hotel fell into disrepair and it was closed. However, the hotel was bought and has again been renovated into Montenegro’s most luxurious and expensive hotel resort.
    Regular buses take visitors out to Sveti Stefan from Budva. Non-residents of the hotel must pay €5 to enter the resort so we contented ourselves with admiring the view from above :)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    St. Nikola Island

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The island of St. Nikola lies just off the coast of Montenegro, guarding the entrance to Budva Bay. This uninhabited island, locally nicknamed Hawaii, can be visited by taking a boat trip from Budva. During the summer there are a wide variety of boats plying the route back and forth between Budva and the island.
    The island itself is a beautiful place to while away a few hours and climbing the short path to the summit of the island gives beautiful views up and down the Budva Riviera and back across to Budva itself. The small church of St. Nikola sits on the island and around the church are various tombs and graves said to contain the remains of crusaders who died in Budva on their way back from the Holy Land.
    During the summer there is a small restaurant on the island and it is possible to rent snorkelling equipment.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    City Walls

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The former glory of the ramparts of Budva's Old Town have been completly restored and a walk along the city walls is a great way to orient yourself to the Old Town. You can enter the City Walls from the close to the Kastel, and you can walk almost the whole way along the ramparts encircling the town. The views out from the town and across the bay, towards Budva’s backdrop of mountains and even as far as Sveti Stefan are spectacular. You also get a bird’s eye view of the Old Town and its squares and laneways.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Church of Santa Marija in Punta

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Church of Santa Marija in Punta is the oldest surviving church in Budva’s Old Town, said to date from AD840! The exact date is known due to an original inscription in the stone. The church is located right beside the Church of St. Sava and is partly incorporated into the City Walls. During Napoleon’s occupation of the region, the church served as a stable!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Church of St. Sava

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Squirreled away in the corner of Trg Izmedu Crkava is the quaint 13th century Orthodox Church of St. Sava. For a while the church served a joint Orthodox and Catholic congregation but is today recognised solely as Orthodox. The church has produced some of Budva’s most important historical artefacts. Ancient frescoes and significant architectural features have been uncovered here. During the Austrian control of the town, the church served as an arsenal.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Church of St. Ivan/Church of St. John

    by pure1942 Written May 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The churches of the Stari Bar are all located close to each other in the southern end of the town. The Catholic Church of St. Ivan (or Church of St. John) is the largest of the churches and its tall campanile is the most prominent landmark of the town and dates from 1867. A church is said to have existed here since the 9th century but its appearance has changed considerably over the centuries.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Budva

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

84 travelers online now

Comments

Budva Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Budva things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Budva sightseeing.

View all Budva hotels