Kotor Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by pure1942
  • Local Customs
    by Gili_S
  • Bean stew
    Bean stew
    by Rusket

Most Recent Local Customs in Kotor

  • Dizzyhead's Profile Photo

    Local bike.

    by Dizzyhead Updated Jul 31, 2010

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Picture taken in Kotor center.

    I found this bike inside Kotor and I liked it a lot. I would like to have my own. I wanted to show all other interested people how a bike in Kotor can look like. It is a perfect party-bike or to bring your children to places, when they are quite small at least. Or if you have a drunk friend and he/she cannot get home, put him/her in the front and then bike...

    Was this review helpful?

  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    The Local Brew!

    by pure1942 Written Apr 28, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The beer of choice in Montenegro is one brewed in central Montenegro in the town of Niksic. The beer comes in several varieties, with Niksicko Pivo and Nik Gold the most popular. The difference between the two is supposedly that the 'gold' is export quality...but I didn't really notice a huge difference myself expecpt that the 'gold' can be more expensive! There is also a dark variety called Nicksicko Tamno.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Honouring the saint

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 18, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Tryphon and his city

    Ever since the arrival, in 809, of Saint Tryphon's relics the saint has a very special place in the hearts of the people of Kotor, no matter whether they be Catholic or Orthodox. The celebration of his feast day on February 1st is the most important holiday for all townsfolk and the mass held on the Sunday of that week is the culmination of a week of festivities.

    A major revision of the saints celebrated by the Catholic church saw St Tryphon removed from the list of universal saints because of the lack of documented evidence of his life and martyrdom but try telling that to the believers of Kotor. They know their saint was a real man who performed miracles of healing and was martyred for his faith and they know he protects them now as he has done ever since the Byzantine emperor, Constantine Porphyrogenitus, made the city a gift of his relics and sent them to Kotor from their burial place in Lampsakon, near Apamea in Syria, the place of his birth.

    The Catholic Church marks November 10 as St Tryphon's Day, but the saint who came to Kotor was Greek and Kotor at that time had not turned its face west to the Latin world and so, throughout the centuries, Catholic and Orthodox together, the city has continued to celebrate the saint according to the Orthodox calendar.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rusket's Profile Photo

    Let it be clean!

    by Rusket Updated May 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Garbage in nature

    Throughout Montenegro things like this is a common sight. Somebody could make a fortune by putting up recycling units around here! I have become used to sorting my rubbish at home, and felt awkward throwing food scraps, empty bottles and metal waste in the same garbage bag.

    This particulare dumping is not the worst I have seen, there are lots of them up at Vrmac. How come people drive their old stoves and furniture up here to dump them? Is it lack of official dumps or what?

    The last years the authorities have initiated cleanup actions each spring called "Neka bude cisto" = let it be clean. In Kotor 15 unemployed people are paid to clear up along main roads and typical tourist spots, in the period between 1 March and 1 June. LET IT BE CLEAN!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rusket's Profile Photo

    Rakite

    by Rusket Updated May 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rakite seen from Prcanj
    2 more images

    When you are going towards Budva / the tunnel or the serpentine road to Cetinje, you pass the residental area Rakite on your right hand, a little after the bus terminal. (Innermost cluster of buildings, middle of the main picture). Rakite is a typical example of the housing policy of former Yugoslavia: The companies, which were owned by the state (and in a period run by the workers) built appartment buildings, and gave the appartments to their emplyees according to need and seniority. This is how many former workers can sustaine a reasonable life, even though unemplyment rate is high and pensions / welfare is ridiculously low: They own the appartments and pay only a low yearly benifit tax.

    Btw. another custom from that time: There was no direct income tax. Whether it is still like that, I don't know. But when people talk about their income, they talk about what they actually get. I am used to talking about brutto, and when people want to compare wages, which they often do, I have to remember to tell them my netto income.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rusket's Profile Photo

    Bean stew

    by Rusket Written May 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bean stew

    Mmmm, home made bean stew, one of my favourites! Or like here, more like a soup. This is customary all over former Yugoslavia. The secret of not farting too much the next day is: Put the dried beans in water in the evening, pour the water off next morning. Cook the beans in fresh water, and pour it off when boiling. THEN starts the real cooking.

    There are "millions" of ways to make bean stew, this is my favourite: Add boiling water, or stock, to the precooked beans and continue cooking. If you are a vegetarian, you can add vegetable stock. If not, add leftovers of dried meat. I prefer the bone of smoked ham, with still some meat on it. Add an onion cut in large pieces, root vegetables, whole grains of pepper, a bay leaf and garlic cloves. Leave to simmer until beans are soft. I usually like my vegetables "al dente", but these vegetables are primarily here to give taste to the stew! Chop an onion and fry it on high temperature in oil, add some paprika powder. If you want a thick consistency, drizzle a tablespoon or two of flour over the onions while frying. Remove the bone from the beans, but leave the meat. Add the onion mix to the stew and stir well. Note: The stew is always best the next day, so make a double portion!

    Eat with salad and bread. If you like, eat it with smoked sausages or other meat.

    If you want to look for home made bean stew in restaurants: Beans is "grah" in croatian and "pasulj" in serbian.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Fancy door knocker

    by JLBG Written Sep 29, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Though most entrances have an electronic porter, some have kept their old door knocker or even have added one. This one has obviously been added recently and has not been set properly, but who cares as it is not going to be used ! The knocker should not hit a wooden part of the door (the paint would be soon flaked off !) but a built in anvil. Here, they have set the anvil separately, on top of the knocker !

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Njeguški pršut

    by JLBG Written Sep 29, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many places in Europe have a famous ham and mountain hams are always the more tasty. However, Njeguški pršut (Ham from Njeguši, a 1000 m elevation village on the road from Cetinje to Kotor) is very special and has a taste that I have never found anywhere else. I strongly recommend.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Crkva Sv. Nikola

    by karenincalifornia Written Dec 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crkva Sv. Nikola, Kotor, Montenegro

    One of the most impressive buildings in Kotor is arguably out of place. It is the Serbian Orthodox Crkva Sv. Nikola, or the Church of St. Nicholas. Unlike many of the surrounding buildings that date back to the 12th century, the Crkva Sv. Nikola wasn't built until 1909.

    Nonetheless, it is a beautiful church built in Byzantine style and it houses an impressive collection of icons.

    Serbian orthodox churches in Serbia & Montenegro and the United States have many similarities. You will often see the Byzantine style of church in the US, and many of the US churches also have beautiful icons, painted with lots of gold, although the ones in the US are quite a bit newer.

    I am told the liturgy is the same, whether it takes place in a Serbian Orthodox church in Serbia & Montenegro and the United States. The Serbian Orthodox liturgy is beautiful with incredibly rich choral music, and if you ever have an opportunity to stop in on one, you should. Generally, liturgy is at 10:00 am on Sunday morning.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Church of St. Luca

    by karenincalifornia Updated Dec 20, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Church of St. Luca, Kotor, Montenegro

    The Church of St. Luca dates back to 1195 and sits in the same trg as the town hall. It was built as a Catholic church, and then was transferred to the Serbian Orthodox church in 1657.

    Today, the church is used by both religions. The entire Bay of Kotor has a mixture of Orthodox and Catholics, with some Muslims as well.

    The fortress of St. Ivan can be seen at the top of the hill.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Message in a bottle :)

    by Aurorae Written Aug 31, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I always thought it was a joke, but one day i realized that people REALLY wrote messages in the botte. :) So, this is one of the bottles that sailors from Kotor used to put the letters inside and throw them into the sea, hoping somebody would find them, hopefully the right person. :)

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Navy of Boka

    by Aurorae Updated Aug 31, 2004
    by Strugar

    THe navy of boka Kotorska was formed as a brotherhood of sailormen for helping each other. It had its "constitution" already in 15th century! The day of the Boka navy is 3rd of Feburary, which is also the day of St. Tripun, the protector of Kotor.
    You can see the sailors in the traditional uniforms.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Kotor carnival

    by Aurorae Written Aug 31, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Every summer there is a Kotor carnival, usually in the beginning of August. There are concerts, regattas, abrums at sea, evenings of group singing tradition songs and evenings of feasts, masks ball carnival dress-up, parade of masks, fireworks until the dawn, in the old town of Kotor. There can be over 30.000 people!!! And Kotor has just a couple of thousand inhabitants!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    nirvana

    by Aurorae Written May 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Relax, relax and even more relax! That is Montenegrin attitude! :) And I absolutely LOVE IT! Being at the seaside can't provoke any other impulse because the beuaty is overwhelming and it consumes, you are totally taken by the sea spirit and relaxed Montenegrin atmosphere... You can feel so ALIVE and so happy to breathe with full lungs!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    fire

    by Aurorae Written May 29, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kotor by Jelena

    All over the coast there is a wide spread custom to sit around the grill fire and prepare fish (or meat) while chatting with friends/family and drinking wine. A summer cannot pass without outdoor grill nighjts and romantic flames. :)

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Kotor

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

75 travelers online now

Comments

Kotor Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Kotor local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Kotor sightseeing.

View all Kotor hotels