Kotor Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Kotor

  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Clock Tower

    by ruki Updated Jan 23, 2006

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    It is located in "Piazza of the arms" (Trg oruzija) in the center of the old town Kotor. It is belive that clock is from 16 century. On this Piazza there are lot of cafes all around and you have a great view on the main entrance in the old town.

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    Dont miss to climb

    by ruki Written Jan 23, 2006

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    If you want to see Kotor from the top, it is the best way. It will take about one hour to come on the top. I was climbing on the winter so it wasnt hot, but I suposed that on the summer you must bring lot of wather for drink. Dont forget some cosy shoes. On the way to top, you will see relics of the fortress, colums....great ornaments......

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    Amazing view from the top

    by ruki Written Jan 23, 2006

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    It is not hard to climb. View from the top is amazing!!!!!! You can see almost hole Kotor bay. It is worth to climb and enjoy in the green crystal wather and the fantastic look on old town.
    When you planing to climb, check the weather because it would be pity to go up on cloudy and bad weather.

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    On the top (on the clouds)

    by ruki Written Jan 23, 2006

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    For they who are not fear of the height, I advice to go on some of the hills on Kotor bay. For exemple Hill Vrmac –with point St.. Ilija on 766 m high. On many mountain tops you can see the remains of the snow. This are for people who are in good shape and who like adventure.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Fjord or bay?

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    Looking across to Leperane
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    As dramatic as any Nordic fjord, the Gulf of Kotor is actually a drowned river. Whatever its geomorphic origins, not only is it stunningly beautiful , with steep mountains dropping into its still, blue waters, it is blissfully quiet and empty of all but the occasional yacht or small fishing boat. The closed nature of the landscape creates its own micro-climate with a higher than usual rainfall for this part of Europe and the result is lusher, almost subtropical vegetation with lots of palm trees and exotic species such as magnolias and camellias as wellas the usual Mediterranean citrus, pomegranates, figs, grapevines, etc. Pretty small towns and villages lie along the shoreline and two tiny islands, each with an equally tiny church face each other across the water off the small town of Perast.

    The Gulf of Kotor covers a large area and even to drive around the inner bays takes quite some time. As we were only there for the day and had to return to Dubrovnik that evening we opted to drive around the north of the bay to Kotor and then continue on past Kotor to Leperane where we took the car ferry back to the northern shore for the road back to Croatia.

    Click on image for full panorama

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    From Cetinje to Kotor

    by JLBG Updated Sep 30, 2005

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    The road from Cetinje to Kotor is a must drive. The first part is inland. The road is narrow, winding and steep. Suddenly, there is a view on the other side of the mountain. On the left, in the background, the Adriatic sea and the peninsula is the mountain of Luštica. Closer, in the middle of the picture, Tivastski Zaliv (Tivat's bay) with in the middle of the bay a small peninsula between U Krtole and U Polje. It is separated by O Cvijeca of a narrow island with Sveti Marko. Tivat is hidden by the hills in the foreground.

    The second photo was shot a little further. The Adriatic can hardly be seen in the background. Tivastski Zaliv fills now completely the middle of the picture. The airstrip pf Tivat airport stretches across the picture and the town of Tivat shows on the right.

    Again a little further, the third photo shows now on the right a part of the modern town of Kotor. Kotor and Tivat are linked either by a mountain road (seen on the left) or by a tunnel (not shown on the picture, of course). When we were in Kotor, the tunnel was closed and thus, though in the end on July, there were not many visitors in Kotor (thanks to Jelena, VT Aurorae, for the explanation) .

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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Streets of the old town

    by ruki Written Jan 23, 2006

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    I thing that the small and narrow streets, and charming piazzas are the most powerful points in Kotor. Walking on the streets you can feel the real atmosfere of the old town. Also if you are watch more carefully you will note many interesting datails and arches on the balcons, doors and columns which are amazing.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Perast's churches

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    Two churches for St Nicholas
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    St Nicholas is a much-loved saint throughout Eastern Europe so it's no surprise that Perast's largest church is dedicated to him. A church of this dedication was built here in the late 16th century but plans to replace that earlier church with one bigger and grander saw the foundations for a new church being laid in 1740. This new church was never finished however and today only the apse and sacristies are standing, combining with the old church to form the one we see today.

    The free-standing belfry was built in 1691 in the mixture of Romanesque and Renaissance that is so typical of churches in this part of the world. The handsome clock was brought from Venice in 1730. As well as a collection of fine paintings and a splendid Baroque organ, the church has a valuable collection of vestments and ecclesiastical paraphenalia in its treasury.

    If the bell tower is open - it was closed the day we were there - the views from its 55 metre height must be quite spectacular and well worth the climb.

    Look up as you drive out of town and you will see the Church of St. John the Baptist (photo 3) - it too dates from the 16th century when it was used by the mediaeval Confraternity of the Wounds of Jesus Christ. The facade of the church is again typical of churches seen all around the Adriatic with its small rose window over the entrance and two bell gables one above the other. A casting mark on one of the bells dates it to 1596.

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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Fortress over Kotor (Defence Walls)

    by ruki Written Jan 23, 2006

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    This defence walls are all around of city and they up on the hill to 280 metars. It is about 4,5 km long. To go on the top you have stairs and it is very easy to climb. It is hard to know from which century are the walls. Probably from Illiryan time. Of course this walls are used for protection of the enemy.

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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    climbing high

    by Aurorae Written May 29, 2004

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    Kotor by Jelena
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    Climbing the fortress behind the Kotor old town is a MUST!!! Don't do it in the mid-day if it's summer because the sun is going to kill you, but early morning or afternoon is the best time. The view is breathtaking!!! And on the way you'll find interesting spots, and a small church.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Perast's proud past

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 1, 2007

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    Pretty litle Perast
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    Driving around the Bay of Kotor's north shore, the road will take you high above the little town of Perast. It's well worth turning off the road and making your way down to the bayside to spend a while exploring. Perast's a sleepy little place nowadays but its quiet streets and foreshore bely its significant past as one of the major city-states of the mediaeval Adriatic.

    Known to have been settled in the Illyrian and Roman era, independent in mediaeval times, along with Kotor - 15km along the road - and Dubrovnik, over the border in neighboring Croatia - Perast was ruled by Venice during the 17th and 18th century - in fact this was the last place to fly the Venetian flag after the Republic's fall in 1797. Looking at the small fishermens' boats and pleasure craft that tie up at the town's old stone quays now, it's hard to realize that once the city had a navy that numbered its ships in the hundreds, but a walk through the town will reveal many grand building - some ruined, some in good order, some dating as far back as the 14th century, others bearing the lion of St Mark - the symbol of Venice.

    The town stretches for almost a kilometre along the bay but there is only room for a couple of streets at the base of the mountain behind. You'll need to park on the quayside and walk - the steep steps and narrow old streets were built long before cars were even thought of!

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Kotor, the harbor and the city wall.

    by JLBG Written Sep 29, 2005

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    When you arrive in Kotor from the mountain, the first thing you will see is the sea (Kotorski zaliv = the bay of Kotor) and a wall climbing the steep slopes of Mount Lovcen.

    The city walls climb from sea level up to 260 meters above the city and are twice the length of Dubrovnik's walls. Kotor city walls should be more impressive than Dubronik's but are not (this is my opinion). Why ?

    The photographer answers : in the morning the city wall are not lit by the sun and stay in the shade. At noon, they get the sun but noon sun is always very bad both for viewing and photographing. In the afternoon and evening, the sun hits the slopes of Lovcen mountain perpendicularly and every contrast is erased. Then as far as I know, there is no time in the day (at least in summer) when the city walls make both a wonderful landscape and a good photo !

    This tip shows the right part (south east) of the city wall. If you enlarge the photos, you will better see.

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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Gospa od Skrpjela

    by ruki Written Sep 22, 2007

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    Gospa od Skrpjela (from the Italian Madonna dello Scarpello) is a baroque church on one of two islets, deep in the Bay of Kotor, across from the town of Perast. The islet is man-made, and had its original church was built in 1452. The present church is from 17th century.
    According to legend, the island was made over the centuries by the sailors who kept an ancient oath. Upon returning from each successful voyage, they laid a rock in the Bay. Over time, the island gradually emerged from the sea.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    From square to square

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 8, 2007

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    Arms Square

    Kotor's streets have no names but the city is small enough for this not to really matter. Most of the main buildings are situated on one or other of the squares (which are mostly anything but square and, just to confuse you, often go by more than one name) and it's only a few steps from one to the next.

    Leading from the main gate is the wide main square, known since Venetian times as Arms Square. The Armory, Duke's Palace and Tower of the Guards can be found here as well as the 17th century clock tower and two grand palaces - the 18th century Beskuca Palace where you'll find a fine Gothic carving over the door and the 14th century Bizanti Palace across the street. Follow the street between the palaces and you'll find yourself in what was once known as Flour Square, so called for the warehouses that stored the city's flour. Nowadays it's mostly known as Small Square, though some folk still use the Communist-era name of Liberation Square. There are palaces here too - Pima Palace, built after the earthquake of 1667 and the 14th century Buca Palace.

    The city's grandest buildings stand just around the corner in St Tryphon's Square - the City Hall, St Tryphon's Cathedral with its Bishop's House and the Gothic 14th century Drago Palace and from there a few short steps will take you to Museum Square where, yes, you'll find the city's Maritime Museum housed in the baroque 18th century Grgurina Palace . The city's well is in this square - and even today it's a focal point for people to gather, though these days it's a beer or a coffee they come for in the cafe rather than to draw precious fresh water.

    St Luke's Square (aka Greek Square) is dominated by the 20th century Church of St Nikola but it takes its name from the much older St Luke's Church over in the corner, a 12th century survivor of the many earthquakes that have struck the region.

    This walk has taken you in a loop back to the seaward wall. Other small squares are tucked in around the city - each with a focal point such as a church or a grand house.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Closer to Kotor

    by JLBG Updated Sep 30, 2005

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    Again, a little further, the photo shows in the left, the peninsula with the summit of Popova Glava (584 m) and in the middle Kotoski Zaliv (Kotors's bay). The old city of Kotor shows a little on the right while the opposite shore is lined by the cities of Muo, Priċanj and Donji Stoliv.

    The second photo is a full view of Kotor (Cattaro) from Mt. Lovċen (Monte Leone 1753 mt.).

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Kotor Things to Do

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