Kotor Transportation

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  • Montenegro
    Montenegro
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  • Croatia
    Croatia
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Most Recent Transportation in Kotor

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    Bus from Kotor to Split

    by Avieira67 Updated Feb 26, 2013

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    A morning bus on Wednesday, Saturday and Monday travels between Ulcinj and Split.

    Kotor - Split
    07:10 - 13:50
    Split - Kotor
    16:00 - 22:35

    Bus company: PanoramaBus

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    Kotor to Bosnia

    by Jetgirly Written Nov 1, 2012

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    Bus Schedule Kotor to Mostar

    It's a long bus ride from Kotor to Mostar, Bosnia, but those not averse to border crossings can take the daily 14:45 bus which passes through about seven different passport controls as the road veers between Montenegro, Croatia and Bosnia. Yup, they check your passport when you leave Montenegro, enter Croatia, leave Croatia, enter Bosnia, leave Bosnia, re-enter Croatia, leave Croatia and re-enter Bosnia. So don't put it back in your bag! Your longest stops will be the Dubrovnik bus station (five minutes or so and local vendors only take Croatian kuna... though there is an exchange at the end of the row of vendors) and then a town in the hills (I'm not even sure which country we were in!) where the bus stops for fifteen minutes or so at a panoramic viewpoint where local vendors are friendly and you can buy baked goods or ice cream treats. The cost of a ticket on this route is about thirty euro.

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    From Dubrovnik

    by Treeman28 Written Aug 17, 2011

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    Having scoured the internet for bus times and given up, I came to Dubrovnik bus station with crossed fingers. A link I was directed to, and wishfully ignored due to the scarcity of buses, turns out to be correct. There are only a handful of buses to Kotor a day, and we only managed to get a morning one because the 10:00 was late by an hour and a half.

    The journey was around three hours long, and part of that was spent sitting at the border. For this one bus, there was no air conditioning (others in Montenegro had it) and it was a full bus. It stops at Herceg Novi, crosses by ferry to Tivat and then continues to Kotor.

    The bus cost us €9 (I think including the €1 charge for baggage)

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Taxi

    by Gili_S Written May 22, 2011

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    If ten minutes easy walk from the bus station to the old city is too long to walk or you might have heavy language with you then you can just take a taxi, no need to look anywhere, they are waiting just outside the bus station.

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    Airport

    by Gili_S Written May 21, 2011

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    Kotor has a small international airport which can be very convenience for whoever travel by air or even better if you have your own plane :)
    There are only few international airlines flying here from the region (short flight) as well as direct flights from Russia.

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    Local Bus

    by Gili_S Written May 20, 2011

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    inside the local bus

    The easiest way to get to Kotor, unless you have you own car is by bus. There are some local bus lines that goes all the time, for example I used the line from Budva that goes about every hour to Kotor and the trip took about half an hour. The same easy way I used the bus also on my way back to Budva. Don't expect those buses to be any modern and the air condition might not be working, be happy that your seat is intact :)

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    Bus

    by antistar Updated Apr 6, 2011

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    Information on buses to Kotor is thin on the ground, but there are direct international buses to Dubrovnik, Sarajevo and Mostar. The Sarajevo bus runs to Ulcinj, and stops at Mostar, Dubrovnik and Kotor en route. There's a night bus leaving Mostar around 11pm, and early in the morning around 7am. It gets to Dubrovnik a few hours later, and Kotor about 6 hours later.

    There are also buses to places all over Montenegro, but these tend to be more run down contraptions lacking air conditioning.

    The station is a little walk outside of the old town. Walk south along the coast, and then take a left after the Planto supermarket.

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    Bus from Dubrovnik to Kotor

    by pure1942 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If, like us, you are travelling to Kotor from Dubrovnik, you will need to take a bus as there are no trains between Dubrovnik and Kotor.
    There is one daily bus from Dubrovnik to Kotor at 10.30, which goes on to Budva. There is also an additional bus on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, which leaves at 20.30. Buses leave from Autobusni Kolodvor Dubronik and leaves you off at the main bus station in Kotor. The bus passes through Herceg Novi, the closest major town to the Montenegro/Croatia border.

    You can also get a daily bus to Herceg Novi at 15.30 but note this bus does not continue on to Kotor so you would have to catch another local bus to Kotor.

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    Globtour

    by Rusket Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I travelled with Globtour Medjugorje from Mostar via Dubrovnik to Kotor april 2006. Globtour was a large tour operator in former Jugoslavija, established in 1968. I don't know whether the Hercgovacko based Globtour has any cooperation with the Slovenian one, or if they today operate as independant companies. Their buses are comfortable and airconditioned, and they have toilets. BUT the toilet on the bus I travelled with was closed! The reason, I was told, was that there is nowhere to empty it along the route. And the stops are short and few. That is a big problem for people like me, who have an active bladder :-(

    There is a long stop in Dubrovnik. Lucky for me I had a few croatian coins from a previous visit to pay for the toilet. There is an ATM at the bus terminal in Dubrovnik, but that was no help: It was Easter, everything was closed, there was nowhere to change notes obtained from it. Nowhere to buy food, either.

    From Dubrovnik there are a couple more departures to Kotor. You can check on the linked site: "Polazni grad" means departure city, "dolazni grad" means arrival city. But don't take the result for granted, my departure from Mostar was at 07:00, half an hour later than the search result said. It is ALWAYS wise to check at the bus station a day ahead. And in the peak season it is advisable to buy the ticket ahead, too.

    Fare: 24 KM / 12 Euro from Mostar to Dobrovnik, 25 KM / 12,5 Euro from Dubrovnik to Kotor.

    Note: These buses do not stop by Cilipi airport!

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Air

    by antistar Written Nov 1, 2010

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    There is an international airport just 3-4 km from Kotor: Tivat airport. Unfortunately it only serves a few airlines and destinations. Most go to Russia, but one flies to the UK with Thomson Airways. The former Yugoslavian airline, JAL, also flies here from Belgrade.

    Alternatively you can fly to Dubrovnik or Podgorica airports, and then take the bus/drive from there. Neither are very convenient, however.

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  • geting from dubrovnik airport to kotor

    by dario_cupic Written Apr 2, 2010

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    detail from ferry

    from/to airport dubrovnik-kotor, there is one travel agency from herceg novi (montenegro), there are making transfers from and to airport dubrovnik, you can reserved transfer without payment before, really good services

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    Crossing the Border

    by pure1942 Written Apr 28, 2009

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    Crossing the border between Croatia and Montenegro is generally painless and hassle free, although you could be in for a wait...depending on who and what is in front of you. Going through to Montenegro our first time, we were held up for over an hour while the bus in front of us was given a thorough going over by the border police. Our turn took less than 10 minutes so don't know what they were looking for on the bus in front of ours...could be something to do with the Albanian plates and stereotypes unfairly surrounding them!
    You won't need to get off the bus. The driver will collect your passports, get them stamped and return them to you on the bus.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Coming from Croatia

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 10, 2007

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    Park 'n' walk

    Kotor is a popular day trip from Dubrovnik. If driving yourself isn't an option, there are day tours available - a long day but still quite do- able. Using public transport will require a night's stopover as the bus timetables between the two cities do not allow enough time to make the trip and see the sights on the same day as there's only one bus a day in each direction. The bus from Dubrovnik leaves at 11am, the one from Kotor to Dubrovnik leaves at 1.15pm - so unless you're planning to stay the night, you simply cannot do it this way.

    Our hire car arrangement allowed us entry to Montenegro without any additional paperwork, insurance, etc - all we needed was the Croatian hire car documents and our passports. The border crossing took just a few minutes, coming and going, on both sides. As we crossed into Montenegro we were greeted by a local tourist officer who presented us with an excellent English-language guidebook and waved us on our way with a smile.

    We took the narrow, twisting road all the way around the Bay to Kotor through Perast; the scenery is magnificent and on a Sunday in June, the road was all but deserted. We were able to find parking right outside the main gate though I would imagine that may not be quite so simple later in the season! There are other carparks dotted around outside the walls however.

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    No aching feet here

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 8, 2007

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    Easy
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    The Stari Grad (Old City) of Kotor was built at a time when there were just three methods of transport on land - horses for the rich, donkeys for the not so rich and shanks' pony for the rest. You can't even imagine carriages being of any use in the rugged mountain terrain around the Bay of Kotor. So, once you pass through the walls, walking is the only way to find your way around the city. Not that you'll be footsore at the end of the day, unless you decide to tackle the 1500 steps up to St John's Fortress, quite a challenge but with spectacular views as your reward.

    The streets and squares of Kotor are mostly paved with large flat stone blocks, there are some steps but not too many, the narrow passages between the tall houses provide plenty of shade and there are more than enough pleasant cafes where you can sit with a long cold drink before you head off around yet another corner. The city is tiny, no more than 500 metres from one end to the . Even by the time you've walked along the seafront promenade and over the bridges leading out of the lesser gates you won't have walked more than two or three kilometres. I'd still leave the high heels at home.

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    Across the bay

    by TheWanderingCamel Written Dec 8, 2007

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    Luxury
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    The protected waters of the Gulf of Kotor have always provided the city with access to a wider world beyond its mountain-ringed fastness. Boats are a way of life here and any visitor is bound to have the opportunity to take to the water at some time. Some will sail into the bay on a luxury craft, others will spend an hour or two on a small excursion with a local boatman. Maybe you'll take the ferry that shuttles back and forth across the Verige channel all day and night between Lepetane and Komenari. Whatever you do, you will be following in a centuries-long tradition that saw Kotor sustain a naval history that made it a formidable force in this part of the world way beyond its size. With plans afoot to turn the old naval base at Tivat into a yachting base to rival Antibes and Palma, the day may not be far off when the the bay is once more filled with sails.

    Ad hoc arrangements can be made with local boat owners in Perast to visit the island churches just off shore.

    Several companies offer boat trips from the Kotor quayside opposite the main gate. Ankica Taxi Boat offers set tours and is also available for a full day's hire.

    The Leperane-Komenare ferry operates around the clock from June 1 to September 30 and from 0500-2400 for the rest of the year.

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    • Sailing and Boating

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