Slavija & Vracar, Belgrade

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  • Church of St. Sava
    Church of St. Sava
    by Airpunk
  • Church of St. Sava
    Church of St. Sava
    by Airpunk
  • Church of St. Sava
    Church of St. Sava
    by Airpunk
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    Church of St. Sava

    by Airpunk Written Jun 6, 2013

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    Church of St. Sava
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    St. Sava is supposed to become one of the largest church buildings in the world and the largest of the Serbian Orthodox church. It is located on a spot where supposedly St. Sava was amssacred by the Turks. Since the beginning of its construction in 1895, it has been a never-ending construction site. Two world wars, a couple of other conflicts as well as communist opposition and bureaucracy in post-WWII Yugoslavia delayed the continuation of construction several times. Between 1941 and 1985, it was even deconsecrated. St. sava church has the form of a greek cross and has the characteristical domes of Byzantine style architecture. Although I am curious to see how the church will look like once it is finished, the cold concretd atmosphere of the unfinished church is more than worth visiting as well. Despite being a construction site, it is already fully working.

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    Spirit of Vracar

    by Odiseya Written Nov 10, 2012

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    St. Sava Temple

    St. Sava Temple or the Cathedral of Saint Sava in Belgrade, is an Orthodox church, the largest in the Balkans, and one of the 10 largest church buildings in the world.
    On 23th April 1938. Orthodox believer of Belgrade was laid the foundation of the Temple on the location where it is believed his remains were burned in 1595 by the Ottoman Empire's Sinan Pasha.

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    SVETI SLAVA CHURCH

    by mtncorg Written Sep 13, 2011

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    The Temple of Sveti Slava
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    Rome has St Peters, Istanbul the Hagia Sophia and soon Beograd will have a completed St Slava. Echoes of the Sophia can be found within the huge dome of St Slava. The church is still unfinished with preparations for construction dating back to 1894 – the 400th anniversary of the desecration of St Slava’s remains by Turks on this site. Wars and communism kept getting in the way until 1985 when with Tito dead, work began to roll forward, the dome being erected in 1989. 2004 was to be the completion date but the interior remains unfinished. When done, there will be room for over 10,000 worshippers and a choir of 800. Christ Pantocrator will be mosaiced in the domes inside ceiling with eyes that stretch for four meters. It will be the third largest Orthodox Church in the World. Outside on the north side is the much smaller old chapel of St Slava, relocated here in 1935. On the southwest side of the grounds is the National Library built in 1970 replacing an earlier building which had been burnt in German bombing raids of 6 April 1941. To the west side of the parks in front of St Slava is a monument to Karaðeorðe erected in honor of the 175th anniversary of the First Serbian Uprising. The plan is the the Patriarchate will also move out here when the temple is finally completed.

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    Hram Svetog Save

    by viddra Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    by viddra

    Hram Svetog Save (Saint Sava's Temple) is in fact the biggest orthodox temple in the world, though not complete yet. The construction of this monumental building began in 1894 but stopped during the wars. It was restarted in 1985.

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    Narodna Biblioteka

    by viddra Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    by viddra

    With over 5 million publications, Narodna biblioteka (National Library) is considered to be major informative and cultural capital of Serbia.
    The building in the picture's in fact the new library building from 1973. The old building was destroyed on 6 April 1941.

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    St. Sava Temple HRAM SVETOG SAVE

    by goga4444 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St Sava temple

    Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236) son of Stefan nemanja, first serbian ruler. He was the first Serb archbishop. He and his father went to Mountain Athos in Greece ( Sveta Gora ) in Hilandar Monastery.
    Saint Sava is celebrated as the founder of the independent Serbian Orthodox Church and as patron saint of education. day od St Sava is 27 th of January and it is celebrated in all schools.

    This Temple is devoted to St Sava. Construction started 1985 and it is still under construction is the largest active Orthodox temple in the world today.

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    Karadjordje

    by goga4444 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Karadjordje

    This is the monument to Karadjordje ( Black George , Jorge de Negro) He was the main guy in the First Serbian Rebelion against Turks in 1804.

    Author of this monument is Sreten Stojanovic.

    You can see on pic behind the monument there is St Sava temple.

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    ~NARODNA BIBLIOTEKA SRBIJE~

    by Biljana Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Narodna Biblioteka Srbije

    History of the National Library Narodna biblioteka Srbije (NBS or National Library of Serbia) was established in 1832 and as such became the oldest cultural institution in Serbia.

    The library started as a book deposit. Eventually several libraries where united and over time the National Library was established. In 1845, the library had some 1421 titles in its collection.

    WWI brought caused a lot of damage to the library. During the boming campaign on Belgrade a good part of the collection was destroyed. Other parts were scattered all over Serbia including parts of Belgrade, Nis and Kosovska Mitrovica. Part of the collection even ended up in Sofia, Bulgaria during the war but was returned at the end of WWI.

    At the start of WWII, the library burned right down to its foundation. The efforts to replenish the severely damaged collection intensified after the war ended.

    The History of the Building The first building that housed NBS was located in the vicinity of the Main Cathedral (Saborna Crkva). The library was located there briefly from 1832 to 1833. The library was even moved to Kragujevac and it made its way back to Belgrade in 1840.

    At that time it was located on Students Square (Studentski Trg). Then the library moved to Konak Kneginje Ljubice where only a few rooms were used by it and then it was moved to Vracar. In 1864, the library was moved to Kapetan Misino Zdanje where it remained until WWI. Part of this building was damaged in a bombing campaign during 1914.

    During the bombing of Belgrade on April 6th, 1941 the library burned to the ground. Karadjordjev Park was designated as the new location for the library. The library stands there to this day.

    The construction of the new library building began in 1966. The new National Library building was officially opened on April 6, 1973, the anniversary of the start of the bombing campaign that severely damaged the library.

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    St Sava's Church

    by tim07 Updated Oct 24, 2010

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    Set in landscaped gardens this beautiful building is such an impressive sight. The dome can be seen throughout the city and the building really stands out when it is lit up at night.

    The decision to build the church was approved in 1926 and construction started in 1935. This was interrupted by the Second World War. Work only started again in 1985. Today the outer shell is complete but building work continues inside. It's possible though to go inside and worship or light a candle.

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    Monument to Karadorde

    by tim07 Updated Oct 17, 2010

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    Erected in 1979 this is a monument to Karadorde. His name was Dorde Petrovic but he was better known as Karadorde (Black George). He was the leader of the first large scale rebellion against the Turks in the First National Uprising of 1804.

    Set on a mound with St Sava's Church in the background, the monument gives a great photo opportunity.

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    Hram Svetog Save

    by mikey_e Updated Jul 3, 2009

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    Xram Svetog Save and Karadordevic
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    Given that Belgrade is the seat of one of the larger autocephalous churches in the Orthodox Christian faith, you would expect that it would have a huge cathedral or church or some kind worthy of the city’s status as the capital of Serbian Orthodox Christianity. Saint Sava’s Cathedral is intended to fill this role and beyond, as it is the largest Orthodox Church in the entire world; unfortunately, incredibly slow construction saps some of its appeal. Actually, from the outside, this is still an impressive building, especially if you are looking at it from the statue of Karadordevic, which provides an excellent set up for memorable pictures of the Serbian capital. Once you enter the church, however, you’ll notice that it feels more like an empty warehouse than a place of worship. There is a sort of makeshift prayer room – I won’t call it an altar because it lacks an iconostasis and essential is just a collection of icons, relics and candles that is sort of a one-stop prayer shop for the faithful. From what I understand, the construction is rather slow – it was begun 1935, stopped several times because of war and the like, and the latest bought of activity began in 1985. Of course, more war and isolation haven’t helped speed up the construction. The Temple is built on the site where Saint Sava’s remains – the founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church - were allegedly burned by the Ottoman Sinan Pasha in 1895. It is supposed to complete a line that goes directly from Kalemegdan Park through the city centre and that provides a sort of “axis of glory” for the Serbian capital.

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    Sv Sava Ortodox Cathedral

    by MacedonianUK Written Feb 20, 2009

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    On Varchar platou, is Sv Sava Christian Ortodox Cathedral, the biggest Ortodox Church in the world.
    It was build on the same place where Sinan Pasha in the late 1500s burned the remeins(relics) of St Sava, the first Arch Bishop of the Serbian Ortodox Church.
    Also known as Prince Rastko of Middleage Serbia, he was the younger son of King Nemanja. After the Crusaiders left Serbia on their way to the Holy Land, Rastko went to Mnt Athos with his father and took an oath as a monk.
    Comming back to Serbia to bring schools and learning.
    Sv Sava is Saint protector of the childern and schools. Celebrated on January 27 every year.
    The National Anthem of Serbia " Boze Pravde" mantion St Sava too.
    Sv Sava is epitomy of the every thing Christian Ortodox and Serbian for the people of Serbia. Together with King Lazar, they ARE what makes Serbia as an Nation. Divine & Heroic....

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    Jugoslovensko Dramsko Pozorliste

    by mikey_e Written Jan 23, 2009

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    Jugoslovena Dramsko Pozoriste

    The Jugoslovensko Dramsko Pozoriste or the Yugoslav Dramatic Theatre is a massive glass structure that seems shockingly modern in old-fashioned Belgrade. The structure reminds me of more than a few places in Toronto, and seems to have been inspired by an avant-garde idea of the theatre’s role in society. The truth is that, although the Theatre itself was founded in 1947, the original building was burnt down in 1997, and was only rebuilt in 2003, which explains its appearance. It was a place (and, I suppose, continues to be one) where Yugoslavia and then Serbia’s greatest dramaturges and actors thrilled the public with modern drama. The building itself has won many domestic awards for its design, and deserves at least a bit of attention as you make your way to Hram Svetog Save.

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    Crkva Svetog Save

    by mikey_e Written Dec 21, 2008

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    Crkva Svetog Save

    The Crkva Svetog Save is undoubtedly a much older building than the Hram Svetog Save, and it is also much smaller. Nevertheless, it is a fully functioning church, meaning that it has the full iconostasis and altar and is capable of hosting various religious ceremonies. Indeed, when I was there, there was a christening, which essentially prevented me from admiring the icons and frescoes of the building in detail. Nevertheless, there are many excellent examples of Serbian religious art and icons displayed in the church, and it would be a shame for anyone to miss this church, especially given the contrast with the Hram and the clue, in a way, that it provides to the future set up and grandeur of the Temple, once construction is finally completed.

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    St. Sava Temple-Hram Svetog Save

    by prleprle Updated Sep 5, 2008

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    Hram Svetog Sava, Belgrade, Serbia
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    As the name say it all... Vracar field means field of Druids. In the middle ages and even in ancient times this fild was just outside city walls. The present church is being built at the place where in 1594 Sinnan Pasha had the holy relics of St. Sava burned at the stake, after he had them brought over from the Mileševa Monastery. Preparations for the construction of one of the largest orthodox churches in the world started way back in 1894. After two public competitions, the design authored by architects Bogdan Nestoroviæ and Aleksandar Deroko was approved in 1926. Construction works were interrupted with the bombing of Belgrade at the beginning of World War II. They were continued after a very long pause, in 1985.
    Today, temple is completelly finished outside but interior still have to be finish.

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