Centre, Novi Sad

74 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Srpsko narodno pozorishte
    Srpsko narodno pozorishte
    by Odiseya
  • Centre
    by prleprle
  • The school's grounds
    The school's grounds
    by mikey_e
  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Synagogue in Novi Sad

    by Odiseya Written Sep 30, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Synagogue in Novi Sad was built 1909th in complex with the Jewish Community and the Jewish school, designed by architect Lipot Baumhorn (1860-1932). This complex has been faithfully testimony of social efforts, as well as cultural and economic power of the Jewish community in Vojvodina. one of the largest in this part of Europe, the synagogue was built in a specific manner, Hungarian Art Nouveau, with the stress on clinker bricks as the main means of facade decorations. It is particularly interesting that this synagogue in the Jewish street built as a fifth in the same place.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Serbian national theater

    by Odiseya Written Sep 30, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Srpsko narodno pozorishte

    Serbian national theater (Serbian Cyrillic: Српско народно позориште, read: Srpsko narodno pozorishte) is oldest theater in region.

    Some information:
    The Serbian National Theatre was established in 16/28. July 1861st in Novi Sad, in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The province had previously already existed long theater tradition. Theater was founded in the time of national awareness and the struggle for national freedom. After visit theater company Jovan Knezevic 1860th to the City, Jovan Djordjevic was encouraged to write more articles in the "Serbian daily" on the necessity of the establishment of the Serbian National Theatre. The main motivators for establishing the first theater were Svetozar Miletic, Stefan Branovachki, Jovan Djordjevic and Jovan Jovanovic Zmaj.
    The Serbian National Theatre was established in the Serbian Reading Room session chaired by Svetozar Miletic, primarily as a national institution which had the task of using drama and acting art conveys Serbian word and history, to be the national consciousness and raises cultural level of the Serbs and thereby resist Austrian and Hungarian government. Constituent Assembly was the 29th and 30 May 1862nd and it was passed and the first Constitution of the Company. However, the approval for the establishment and operation of the company waited until 18th July 1865th when Emperor Franz Joseph signed.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    The Synagogue

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Synagogue
    4 more images

    During the 17th and 18th centuries, Turkish power in the Balkans began to wane and the Ottomans, who had been at the gates of Vienna in the 16th century, were gradually pushed farther south, away from Hungary and what is now Vojvodina. The result was that the northern part of modern-day Serbia fell under the rule of the Hapsburg (and then Austro-Hungarian) Empire. In this region, of which Novi Sad was the largest city, Austrian cultural, political, economic and legal influence was strong, and the city began to take on a greater and greater Hapsburg feel. Peoples from all over the Empire began to migrate into the city, including Ashkenazi Jews, who came as commercial travelers and gradually established a community. The current synagogue, which is located close to Trg osvobodenja, is the fifth such building to be erected on that site since the 1700s, and was constructed in 1905-1909. It was built by a Hungarian architect and has clear influences from Central European architecture (unlike the Budapest synagogue, which has clear Moorish influences). There was once a thriving community centred on this building, but many of the Jews of Novi Sad were killed in the Holocaust and thus the full complex (school and cultural buildings) have fallen into a bit of disuse. Nevertheless, there are occasional cultural exhibitions here. There is also a plaque commemorating those who died as part of the Final Solution, located on the front of the Synagogue’s façade.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Matica Srpska

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Matica Srpska
    2 more images

    Matica Srpska is a fairly important building, not just because of its architecture (actually, it is rather unassuming, despite the neo-Classical façade of the building) but because of its role in helping to standardize and formalize the movement for the renewal and renaissance of the Serbian language and culture. The institution was founded in 1826 in Budapest (which was the original centre of Serbian culture during the later years of Turkish occupation) and moved to Novi Sad in 1864. The Matica Srpska (which means Serbian Queen bee) acts very much like the Académie française, issuing rulings on the legitimacy of various forms in the Serbian language and trying to provide a sense of unity and standardize to a language that, at times, appears to be splitting along political lines. After WWII, when the Socialists attempted to encourage even greater unity between the various stokavian peoples, the Matica also addressed questions relating to the Croatian language and the Serbo-Croatian language, but in the 1960s the Matica hrvatska broke off, leaving this institution to be the centre of Serbian language. It helps to carry on a tradition of Novi Sad as being the Serbian cultural capital (the so called Serbian Athens) and, despite the thriving arts and culture scene of Belgrade, it still manages to help Novi Sad maintain its attraction for things literary and artistic.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Jovan Jovanovic Zmaj Gymnasium

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Gymnasium
    1 more image

    The Jovan Jovanovic Zmaj Gymnasium is the oldest school in all of Novi Sad, and was built in 1810 thanks to the donation provided by a wealthy merchant from Novi Sad. The school still functions as an educational institution, which is why you are not allowed to enter it and take pictures – nevertheless, you can still take a few good shots of the building from the streets surrounding it. It has great neo-Renaissance architecture, and helps to complete the “Imperial” feel that Novi Sad undoubtedly got from its long integration in the Hapsburg and Austro-Hungarian Empires. The school has produce many notable Serbs, including Jovan Jovanovic Zmaj himself, a poet.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Ruthenian Greek Orthodox Church

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Church bell-tower
    4 more images

    The Rusyns or Ruthenians (depending on the source and the time period of the document, spelling changes) are a little-known Slavic people who live throughout Central-Eastern Europe. Some claim that they are simply Ukrainians who live outside of Ukraine and who have remained faithful to the Orthodox faith, while the Ruthenians themselves dispute this and identify as being separate from the Ukrainian nation. In Novi Sad, the Ruthenians have a beautiful church that is unfortunately not open to the public – that is, you can’t go inside, but you are able to take pictures of the icons painted on the exterior of the building. The Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul is a small affair, constructed between 1820 and 1847. The icons were painted by a Budapest professor of art and represent the two Apostles (on either sides of the door) and Jesus Christ above the entrance. The Church services a community of about 3000 people (2500 Rusyns and 500 Ukrainians) who are so-called Uniates, as they mix elements of Catholic and Orthodox belief and rites.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Slovak Luthern Church

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Luthern Church spire
    1 more image

    One of the smaller minorities in Novi Sad is the Slovaks, who probably migrated during the time of the Hapsburg Empire and established themselves in the city. The reformed churches (Lutherans, Calvinists, and Protestants of various kinds) aren’t very popular in the northern Balkans – at least not nearly as popular as they were in Central and Northern Europe – probably because of the longstanding theological disputes that existed between Orthodox and Catholics. Nevertheless, some of the Slovaks that migrated professed the faith of Luther, and as a result there is now a Slovak Lutheran Church in the Old Town of Novi Sad. I believe that the Slovak Church is fairly old – at least from the 19th century. Like many Protestant place of worship, it is a fairly plain affair; after all, Luther railed against the extravagant trappings of the Catholic Church. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to get a good look at the Church or go inside – they were paving the street in front of it, and the smell of the tar in 30 degree heat was not conducive to sightseeing.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Nikolajevska Crkva

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nikolajevska's bell-tower
    4 more images

    Nikolajevska Crkva or St. Nicholas’ Church is an old and very beautiful place of worship tucked into the lesser visited streets north of Trg slobode. It is the smallest church in Novi Sad that is of the Orthodox faith, and it was constructed in the 18th century, but was completely destroyed in the riots that followed the 1848 Revolution and was used as a military storehouse up to 1854. The church was rebuilt thanks to the good works of wealthy Novi Sad residents, and its style was influenced by the royal copulas of Kiev. Around the middle of the 19th century the church was favoured by Greek and Romani faithful. Its most famous parishioners, however, were the sons of Albert Einstein, whose first wife was a Serb. Her father insisted that his grandchildren be baptized in this church, which they were, in 1913. The church itself is rather plain, with a simple iconostasis, but its isolation and the tranquility of the garden around it make it quite a draw for anyone who has had enough of the constant construction in Novi Sad.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Museum of Vojvodina

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Museum of Vojvodina
    3 more images

    I don’t think I need to explain my dislike of ethnographic museums to those people who read my tips. I won’t go through the same explanation again on this one, although I will limit myself to saying that the Novi Sad Museum of Vojvodina was perhaps the best example of what I consider to be the worst type of ethnographic museum. Unfortunately, it is one of the only museums in all of Novi Sad, so it was either seeing this or seeing nothing. The institution is in a pretty building on the edge of the historic centre of town, right across from the municipal park. It is pretty standard in its collection: going from pre-history to the creation of Yugoslavia in 1918, it tracks the history of the peoples who have inhabited this part of the world in excruciating detail. Unfortunately, much of the material is actually in Serbian, so unless you have a good grasp of the language it will remain largely a mystery to you. The museum is packed with everything from rock shards to pottery fragments, cloth samples, hut recreations, icons, carvings, royal seals, books, maps, coins, arms and a few carriages. And of course, lots and lots of costumes from the various peoples of Vojvodina. A smaller collection would probably have been a lot more interesting, especially with greater emphasis on the multi-ethnic nature of the region. Unfortunately, the goal of the museum appears to have been documentation instead of education, which means that unless something was blatantly obvious to the visitor, it usually passed right over his head. That shouldn’t discourage you from visiting – again, there aren’t many other formal attractions of the museum or art gallery kind here, and even an imperfect understanding of the region is better than no understanding.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • prleprle's Profile Photo

    Museum of Vojvodina

    by prleprle Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museum of Vojvodina-building, Novi Sad, Serbia
    4 more images

    This is a biggest and most complex museum in town with collections from archeology, history, ethnology, arts... up to natural science. Musum was established in 1847. This building (former Palace of Justice) was open to the public as a Museum in 1933. Museum has collection of some 400 000 pieces but only 6000 are displayed. If you want to find something more about rich history of Vojvodina then this Museum is right place for it. My favourite piece is golden Roman helm found somewhere in Srem region.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • prleprle's Profile Photo

    Serbian National Theatre

    by prleprle Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Srpsko Narodno Pozoriste-Novi Sad, Serbia
    1 more image

    In 1838, the first theatre company among the Serbs was created in Novi Sad as a "Travelling Amateur Theatre". The Serbian National Theatre (Srpsko narodno pozorište) is the oldest Serbian professional theatre. The theatre was founded in 1861 on the meeting of the Serbian Reading-room, held in Novi Sad. Serbian National Theatre is also the oldest professional theatre among the South Slavs. The building which the theatre currently occupies was opened in March 1981 (left on the picture).

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Theater Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • PiceaOmorika's Profile Photo

    Gallery of Rajko Mamuzic

    by PiceaOmorika Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Gallery of Fine Arts - Gift Collection of Rajko Mamuzić, which represents a modern museum-gallery type of institution, was founded in 1972 and opened to the public in 1974. It is located in Novi Sad, Serbia, in a building built according to the designs of architect Filip Smith for the Radulović family of Novi Sad.

    The basic fund of the Gallery represents an anthology of Serbian fine arts from the second half of the 20th century and it contains over 800 works of art, including paintings, sculptures, and drawings by 35 artists. Collector and donor Rajko Mamuzić chose the first post-war generation of artists who, having rejected the laws of socialist realism, took the way of liberated art without any prejudices and dogmas. Nowadays, they represent the most prominent names of Serbian modern arts with the seven of them being members of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (SANU).

    The Gallery is organized thematically, including individual and retrospective exhibitions as well as lectures on authors, and seminars on art and concerts.

    Was this review helpful?

  • PiceaOmorika's Profile Photo

    Museum-Foreign art collection

    by PiceaOmorika Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vojvodina from the Paleolithic era to the middle of the 20th century. The preserved traces of material and spiritual culture are presented in several units: archeology, history, ethnology and modern history.

    This is the largest museum collection of foreign art in Serbia and Montenegro. In 1966, doctor Branko Ilić donated his art collection of 136 paintings of foreign artists, 279 pieces and sculptures, period furniture and other items of applied arts to the town of Novi Sad and the Province. The legacy consists of the works of Western European schools from the XVI century until the end of the XIX century, mostly from the area of Central Europe (France, Germany, Italy and Austria).

    Was this review helpful?

  • PiceaOmorika's Profile Photo

    Matica Srpska Gallery

    by PiceaOmorika Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Working hours:
    Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 09.00 - 15.00h
    Friday 09.00 - 15.00h and 16.00 - 20.00h
    Saturday 10.00 - 13.00h closed on Sunday and Monday.

    Permanent exhibition:
    Serbian art (paintings, graphics, sculpture, drawings and replicas of wall paintings) in Vojvodina from16th to 20th century.

    Was this review helpful?

  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Uspenska Crkva

    by viddra Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Uspenska crkva
    1 more image

    The Church of the Assumption (Uspenska crkva) was built in baroque style in 1735 and renewed several times. It got its present looks in 1780.

    The paintings were done by Janko Halkozovic and Vasa Ostojic, who also made the iconostasis.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

View all Novi Sad hotels

Instant Answers: Novi Sad

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

109 travelers online now

Comments

View all Novi Sad hotels