Pristina Transportation

  • Rule Turs bus to Skopje at Pristina station
    Rule Turs bus to Skopje at Pristina...
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  • Pristina bus station
    Pristina bus station
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  • Bus ticket: Pristina to Skopje one way
    Bus ticket: Pristina to Skopje one way
    by SWFC_Fan

Most Recent Transportation in Pristina

  • lotharscheer's Profile Photo

    By bus from Pristina to Podgorica

    by lotharscheer Updated Jun 6, 2012

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    Xhamia e ��arshis��
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    I was told at the bus terminal (may 2011) there are every day 2 night buses, leaving at 5 and 9 pm, and 2 times per week a daytime bus at 10am (sunday and ?). The 5 pm bus was actually at 5.45 pm and was supposed to arrive at 3 am in Podgorica (first bus from there to Budva, Tivat airport and Herzog Novi at 6.22), but did arrive at 4 am (continuig to Ulcinj).

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    Buses between Pristina and Skopje

    by SWFC_Fan Written Apr 25, 2012

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    Rule Turs bus to Skopje at Pristina station
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    During a visit to Macedonia in March 2012, we decided to make a short visit to the Kosovan capital, Pristina.

    This was a last minute decision and was a rather rushed trip. We were in Ohrid and planning our return to Skopje, when I realised that if we caught an early bus from Ohrid we might just be able to squeeze in an afternoon in Pristina. So, we took the 7:30am bus from Ohrid, arriving in Skopje at 10:45am. We immediately bought tickets for the 11:30am bus to Pristina and then rushed to dump our luggage at our hotel.

    We had read that the journey from Skopje to Pristina can take anything from 1.5 to 3.5 hours depending on traffic and queues at the border and that the last bus back to Skopje was at 5pm. So, as we boarded the bus, we crossed our fingers that this would be a quick journey...otherwise we could find ourselves with just 2 hours in Pristina!

    The following details were correct as at March 2012.

    Skopje – Pristina

    We caught the 11:30am bus on a Friday morning in March 2012. It was a modern coach with "Evropska Linija" emblazoned on its side.

    We paid 340 MKD (£4.50) each for one way tickets. We were told by the English-speaking staff at the ticket office that it was not possible to purchase return tickets and that we'd have to buy tickets in Pristina for our return trip.

    We purchased our tickets around 45 minutes before the bus departed. There was no need to purchase tickets any further in advance. As the bus pulled out of bay number 3 at Skopje's long-distance bus station, there were only 3 other passengers on board the bus in addition to my girlfriend and I. We picked another passenger up just outside the station and a couple more in the northern suburbs of Skopje, but there were still only 8 of us on board when we reached the Macedonia-Kosovo border.

    The journey from Skopje to the border took around 30 minutes, including a 5 minute stop at a petrol station while the driver went to purchase cigarettes which he then proceeded to chain smoke as he drove us towards the border. As he left the bus, the driver handed us a sheet of paper on which all passengers wrote their names and passport numbers. This would save a little time when we got to the border.

    The border crossing was fairly quick and painless. There was no queue in the direction that we were heading, although we noted that the traffic heading into Macedonia was much heavier. Our passports were collected by a border guard at the Macedonian border, taken away and then returned to us a few minutes later. The same procedure then took place at the Kosovan border. With only 8 passengers on board, the process was fairly swift and the entire border crossing took place in 10-15 minutes.

    From there it was a straightforward journey into Pristina. We stopped briefly at the roadside near to the town of Ferizaj to drop a passenger off and then made a couple of stops in the suburbs of Pristina to drop other passengers off.

    We pulled into Pristina bus station at around 1:30pm (a journey time of 2 hours) – leaving us with 3.5 hours to explore Pristina.

    Pristina bus station is located a couple of kilometers from the centre of the city. We took a taxi from outside the station to Mother Teresa Boulevard (cost: 2.5 Euros), but if we'd had more time (and, at that point, a map!) it would have been an easy 20 minute walk into town along Bulevardi Bill Clinton.

    Pristina – Skopje

    Immediately after getting off our bus from Skopje, we made our way into the bus station and found a ticket office to purchase our return tickets. We wanted to ensure that we got tickets for the final Skopje-bound bus of the day at 5pm. It is worth noting that if the 5pm Skopje bus is fully booked, there is also a 5pm bus to Tetovo in Macedonia, from where you could then get transport to Skopje.

    We paid 5.50 Euros each for our tickets on a bus operated by Skopje-based Rule Turs.

    The bus was much busier than the one we came on. It was probably around 75% full when we pulled out of bay number 8 at Pristina bus station and then proceeded to pick up more passengers en-route.

    Unlike on the outbound journey, the bus drove into the town of Ferizaj and stopped at the central bus station there for around 10 minutes. Further passengers boarded here and the bus was practically full.

    The driver collected all passports early on in the journey and there was no sheet for us to fill out our details on this time. Despite the bus being much busier than the one we came on, and the traffic being a lot heavier, the border crossing only took slightly longer than it had done earlier in the day (a little over 20 minutes for the whole process).

    The heavier traffic, the slightly longer border crossing and the stop at Ferizaj bus station meant that we arrived back in Skopje at around 7:40pm; 2 hours and 40 minutes after leaving Pristina.

    The bus made several drop offs in Skopje before ending its journey at the bus station. We jumped off near the Vero Center shopping mall which was closer to our hotel than the bus station was.

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    Taxis to and from the bus station

    by SWFC_Fan Written Apr 3, 2012

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    Our taxi in Pristina, Kosovo
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    We arrived in Pristina after a 2 hour bus journey from Skopje in March 2012.

    We didn't have much time (and we didn't have a map either!) so we decided that taking a taxi from the bus station to the centre of town would be our best option.

    I had read that the bus station is around 2km from the centre of town and that the journey should cost no more than a couple of Euros.

    There were dozens of taxis parked up outside the station so we approached the driver of the vehicle at the front of the queue and asked him how much a journey to the centre would cost. He quoted us 5 Euros, so we declined and walked away, fully intending to walk into town instead.

    As we walked away from the queue of taxis we spotted a "Taxi Meter" sign displaying the per kilometer fares. It was a little battered and difficult to read, but we made a point of photographing it in front of the watching taxi drivers. As we did so, another driver approached us and offered to take us into town for 2.50 Euros. We accepted and jumped in the back of his car.

    Although the journey was only 2km, it took 10 minutes or more due to heavy traffic along Bulevardi Bill Clinton and the streets of Pristina's centre.

    The taxi driver dropped us off outside the Grand Hotel, close to the pedestrianised Mother Teresa Boulevard where we were able to pick up a "Pristina In Your Pocket" guidebook with map and start to get our bearings in the city.

    At the end of our short visit, we hailed a taxi on Bulevardi Bill Clinton to get us back to the station. We again asked the driver up front how much it would cost and he said 1.50 Euros.

    When we arrived at the bus station, the car park attendant tried to charge our taxi driver 1 Euro for entering the station. This would presumably have been added to our fare. We told the driver to drop us off at the entrance and, after the driver pleaded with the attendant, he was given permission to drop us off and turn around with no entrance charge.

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  • Bus to/from Germany

    by tinushi Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There is a weekly direct connection by bus from frankfurt am main to prishtina and vice versa. To pristina leaves every friday and from pristina every saturday.

    Buses are very very comfortable with AC. RT usually is ca 100 EUR.

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  • From Skopje Bus and Train station.

    by bytycci Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you are travelling aroung the Balkans, an easy way to get to Prishtina is from Skopje Bus and Train Station.

    Here is the link to the bus timetables:
    http://www.sas.com.mk/en/timetable.php?results=yes

    There are lots of buses from Sk to Pr. The ride takes less then 2 hrs. It is a pleasant ride, passing through the Kacanik gorge and the Sharr mountains. You will pass by many villages. The border town in Kosova/o is Hani i Elezit/General Jankovic. The other town you pass through is Kacanik. Then you pass by the city of Ferizaj/Urosevac, in the Kosova/o valley.

    A train leaves twice a days from Sk to Pr. Once early in the morning (around 6 am) and once in the afternoon (at 4pm). The train ride offers better views than a bus ride, although the trains are old.

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  • malashen's Profile Photo

    The "Serbian stamp" issue

    by malashen Updated Oct 28, 2009

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    To clarify the issue of Serbian passport stamps:

    If you travel from Serbia (proper) into Kosovo (which is legally a part of Serbia) and back, nobody is going to stop you, regardless of any stamps that the Albanian authorities in Pristina might put in your passport (actually, they don't control the two northern entry points anyway). The problem would be if you travel from Belgrade to Pristina and then you go to Macedonia or Montenegro, or leave Kosovo by plane and return by plane to Pristina. In this case, to enter Serbia proper from Kosovo, you need to exit Kosovo first and then enter Serbia through its internationally recognized borders (FYR of Macedonia, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, Croatia, Belgrade airport), where there are fully operational border control and customs. There is NO BORDER between Serbia and Kosovo (although the Albanians like to view it as a border) but, from the Serbian side, only police and tax inspection control. The Serbian police at the administrative line, however, can turn you back, if you entered Kosovo (legally a part of Serbian territory) through some 3rd country, through an entry point outside of Serbia's control.

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  • Verdone's Profile Photo

    Entering Serbia from Kosovo without a Serb stamp

    by Verdone Written May 13, 2009

    That's correct, if you enter Serbia from Kosovo without a Serbian stamp, they will not let you enter. There is a place in Pristina that you can get a Serbian stamp for your passport which will allow you to enter Serbia, but I am not familiar with the process.

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  • graeme83's Profile Photo

    Bus Skopje to Pristina

    by graeme83 Written Apr 15, 2009

    There are three or four buses a day from Skopje to Pristina. It costs about 5 euro each way. Infuriatingly it takes over 2 hours to cover a distance of just 60km! It only takes about 20 minutes to get to the border from Skopje Bus Station. After about 45 minutes at the border, it then took about another hour to get to Pristina, via a couple of short stops at bus stations in Kosovo itself.

    The scenery is quite nice to look at through the windows of the comfortable bus. There is a large military presence still in the area with peace-keepers from a number of different countries driving around in their military vehicles.

    The last bus in both directions leaves at 5pm.

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  • Greatwalk0's Profile Photo

    When Flying from Pristina to USA Via Vienna

    by Greatwalk0 Written Aug 27, 2008

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    The boarding passes issued by Austrian Airlines in Pristina are not recognized in Vienna International Airport. As such, you have to visit Service Center #2 in Vienna to get your boarding pass reissued upon arrival in Vienna. This is a pretty straight-forward process, but is required.

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  • Yiannis2000's Profile Photo

    Pristina -Skopje by bus

    by Yiannis2000 Written Aug 18, 2008

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    There are frequent (at least in the mornings) buses from the bus station of Pristina to Skopje in North Macedonia, 2,5 hrs, tickets cost ca. 5 euros.
    Picturesque route with quite confortable airconditioned buses.

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  • gogmorgan's Profile Photo

    Travel from Pristina to the South

    by gogmorgan Written May 30, 2008

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    You will need to get a bus from Pristina. It takes about 2-3 hours to Skopje in Macedonia. From there you can either get another bus to Greece or the train. There are 2 trains a day.

    I was there last week and this was all running smoothly then.

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  • Pristina to Athens

    by erinka Written May 9, 2008

    I was just at the Skopje train station last week, since I've found they typically don't update the times on bahn.de for around here. There is a train from Skopje --> Thessaloniki (Solun) at 08:00, supposedly arriving at 13:07.

    You can also check http://sas.com.mk/en/timetable.php?results=yes for bus times; should run every day to Thessaloniki. It also shows the fare price in mkd; which are about 61,25mkd/euro.

    In Skopje, the bus station is in the same building as the train station; you just have to exit and go around the corner.

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  • Greatwalk0's Profile Photo

    Taxis

    by Greatwalk0 Written May 8, 2008

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    Taxis around Pristina are relatively expensive, with flag-fall at 1.50 Euros for the 1st kilometer. After the 1st kilometer the fare rapidly increases. While most taxis have the mandatory meter, some informal taxis do not and require you to negotiate in advance. In my experience, the informal taxis end up being more expensive than their metered counterparts.

    Many taxi companies also allow you to call and schedule a taxi. I have found Victory Taxi to be very reliable and prompt. They can be reached at 044 -111-222.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    How to reach the bus station

    by maykal Written Apr 10, 2008

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    There is no public transport to the bus station. Taxis wait inside the bus station, but they have to pay to enter, which means you have to pay more. At the entrance to the bus station, more taxis wait for more savvy customers and charge the normal fare.

    If you're really cheap, turn right out the bus station until you see the Hotel Victory on the left (it has a gaudy Statue of Liberty on the roof, you can't miss it), and there are buses from the traffic roundabout next to that into the town centre. Not n option if you have lots of baggage though.

    If you're cheap and energetic, walk past the Hotel Victory as described above, and turn left...this road leads straight to the city centre, and there are plenty of cafes and restaurants en route if you get tired.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Buses from Prishtina around Kosovo

    by maykal Written Apr 10, 2008

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    The main bus station is a considerable walk from the city centre. A taxi costs around 3 Euros.

    Buses leave to the main cities and towns in Kosovo very regularly. To destinations like Prizren, Peja, Gjakova, Ferizaj, Gjilan and Mitrovica, they leave every half hour or so, so its a case of just turning up and seeing what is available. Tickets are bought on board, so just climb on your bus and take your seat. Friday afternoons are very busy, when it seems liek half of Prishtina wants to escape for the weekend.

    Buses are comfortable and leave on time. You also get on-board entertainment in the form of a video of music and comedy...unfortunately there don't seem to be many of these videos, so I ended up seeing the same one four times. Bring an iPod or something!

    I've given the Albanian names of the towns, as that is what is on the signs at the bus station and on the buses. Buses for Serbian towns don't seem to leave from this bus station, with the exception of Mitrovica (although I suspect those go to the southern Albanian half of the city and not to the Serbian north).

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