Studenica Things to Do

  • Things to Do
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  • River Ibar, Serbia
    River Ibar, Serbia
    by prleprle
  • River Ibar, Serbia
    River Ibar, Serbia
    by prleprle

Most Recent Things to Do in Studenica

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    Ibar valley

    by prleprle Updated Feb 15, 2010
    River Ibar, Serbia
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    Once upon a time (in 70s and 80s in last century) the Ibar gained notoriety as being the most polluted river in Serbia, especially for frequent spills of extremely poisonous phenol. Nowadays situation is quite opposite, Ibar is green and clean river with great opportunities for water sports.

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    Studenica Monastery-narthex of King Radoslav

    by prleprle Updated Feb 15, 2010
    King Radoslav's exonarthex, Studenica Monastery
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    In the 1230s, a large exonarthex was added by the will of King Radoslav so it is reason why that part of church is called "Priprata kralja Radoslava". Exonarthex is different in style than the rest of the church. It is also erected in Romanesque style but is much larger than the rest of the church, isn't covered with white marble and doesn't has splendid portals and windows. Anyway, interior of this part of church is really great because it has preserved frescoes of high value.

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    Studenica-Presentation of the Holy Virgin's church

    by prleprle Updated Feb 15, 2010
    Church of Presentation of the Holy Virgin
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    The church of the Presentation of the Holy Virgin is a domed single-nave basilica. The Church harmoniously reconciles two architectural styles, the Romanesque outside and the Byzantine inside. At its eastern end there is a three-sided apse, while an extended narthex faces west; there are also vestibules on the north and the south. In the 1230s, a large exonarthex was added. The facades were built with slabs of white marble. The blending of these two styles eventually produced a particular style of architecture known as the Raska School.
    The artistic achievements of the sculpture of Studentica culminate in four portals, primarily the west one, inside between the narthex and the exonarthex. On the north wall under the dome, there is a window made of many square panes with medallions carved on a leaden plaque which represent eight fantastic animals - the symbols of the Virgin's virtues. There are also two rosettes denoting the Divine Eye. The masons came to Studenica most probably from the Adriatic region, perhaps from Kotor, where Nemanja used to have a palace.
    The church was painted in the first decade of the 13th century. The original frescoes have been partly preserved in the altar area, under the dome, on the west wall, and in the lower registers of the nave. The most splendid representation is that of the Crucifixion, painted on blue background in 1209, one of the paramount achievements in Serbian art. On the south wall there is the "founders' composition" which shows the Virgin taking Nemanja-Simon with the church model to Jesus Christ as the Magistrate Impartial.

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    Studenica Monastery-history

    by prleprle Updated Feb 14, 2010
    Church of Presentation of the Holy Virgin
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    The monastery Studenica and it's main church dedicated to the Presentation of the Holy Virgin was constructed over a quite long period. The first stage works were completed by the spring of 1196, when Grand zupan of Serbia, Stefan Nemanja, abandoned his throne and settled in the monastery's foundation. When he later left for Monastery Hilandar on Month Athos, his son and successor King Stefan the First-Crowned took over the care of Studenica. Nemanja died in Hilandar in 1299. Nemanja's third son Rastko (St. Sava), after reconciling his brothers Stefan and Vukan, moved Stefan's relics to Studenica. Under guardianship of Sava, Studenica became the political, cultural and spiritual center of medieval Serbia. Among his other endeavors, Sava composed a Typik, the rule-book where he described St. Simon's life Simon is monastic name of Nemanja), leaving evidence of the spiritual and monastic life of his time.
    Studenica enjoyed continual care by the members of the Nemanjic dynasty. King Radoslav added to the church a splendid narthex in 1235. King Milutin built a small but lovely church dedicated to saints Joachim and Anna.
    Since the fall of the last of the medieval Serbian states in 1459, the Turks often assaulted the monastery. The first of the significant restorations of the damage took place in 1569, when the frescoes in the Church of the Presentation were repainted.

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    Studenica Monastery-King's Church

    by prleprle Updated Feb 14, 2010
    King's church, Monastery Studenica
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    Northwest of the Church of the Virgin there is the church of saints Joachim and Ann, known after its founder King Milutin as the King's Church. The church was constructed in 1314, in the form of a compressed cross, with the exterior structure of an octagonal dome. It is built of stone and tufa, with plastered facades and is much more Byzantine in style than Virgin's church. Inside this small church are completelly perserved and stunning frescoes of significant value, which date from the second half of the 14th century, painted by King Milutin's favorite artists.

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    Studenica Monastery-Monastic residences

    by prleprle Updated Feb 14, 2010
    Monastic residences, Monastery Studenica
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    Within monastery walls there are monastic residences built from 12th up to 20th century. The oldest part of it is St.Sava's dining room from 12th century and tower (pirg) with western gate from 13th century. Most of residences from 13th and 14th century are in ruins nowdays. Part of monastic residences are from 18th, 19th and 20th century and some of it are erected with support of other royal families of Serbia, members of the house of Obenovic and the house of Karadjoredjevic donate a money for that buildings. Architecture of that buildings are really diverse but makes an interesting and unique mixture. In one of that buildings are also monastery treasury where visitors could see interesting religious inventory from different periods of history.

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    Studenica Monastery-Church of St. John the Baptist

    by prleprle Updated Feb 12, 2010
    Remains of the church of St. John the Baptist

    Between the Church of St. Nicholas and the King's Church are the foundations of the church dedicated to St. John the Baptist (Jovana Krstitelja or Jovana Pretece). Unfortunatelly, there didn't much left of this medieval church.

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    Studenica Monastery-Church of St. Nicholas

    by prleprle Updated Feb 12, 2010
    Church of St. Nicholas, Studenica
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    The complex of the Studenica monastery includes the Church of St. Nicholas, a small single-nave church frescoed inside with works from the twelfth or possibly early thirteenth centuries. It's a simple building without much decorations unlike two other churches on monastery ground.

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    Golija Mountain

    by prleprle Updated Feb 12, 2010
    Golija Mountain, Serbia
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    Golija is a beautiful heavily-forested mountain located in the southern portion of Serbia. The area was placed under state protection in 2001 (Category I - Exceptional Importance), taking the name Golija Nature Park.
    The practically untouched nature of Golija, a biosphere reserve, is under the protection of UNESCO for a good reason.
    The highest peak on Golija Mountain is called Jankov Kamen, and gives commanding views of the areas forests, pastures and meadows, as well as of the mountain silhouettes of Kopaonik, Komovi and Prokletije in the distance.
    The symbol of the mountain is Heldreich's mountain maple (Acer heldreichii), building beautiful and well-preserved deciduous and mixed-type forests. 95 registered species of birds make it one of important mountainous European ornithology reserves. 22 species of mammals include rare and protected wolves, brown bears , least weasels, dormouses, red squirrels and water shrew.

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    Maglic Fortress

    by prleprle Updated Feb 7, 2010
    Maglic Fortress, Serbia
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    Maglic is a medieval fortress in Ibar gorge 20 km south from Kraljevo. It is placed atop a hill around which the Ibar River makes a curve, about 100 m above river level. The fortress protected the only caravan road that connected the Morava Valley and Kosovo polje. Its name means The Foggy One from the Serbian word "Magla", meaning fog.
    The fortress consist of seven towers and one dungeon tower connected with walls. The towers are typical for a medieval fortress in the Balkan peninsula with three solid sides and wooden fences on inner side. Maglic has one gate placed in the north, and one small sally port in one of the towers in the southeast part. Inside the fortress are remains of a palace, barracks, and a church of Saint George. There is also a large reservoir for water and a well. In the southern part of the fortress, three towers are placed next to each other to give better protection from attacks.
    Maglic was probably built in the first half of the 13th century by the King Stefan Prvovencani (Stephen the First Crowned) or his son Uros I from the Nemanjic ruling dinasty. During the Serbian empire it was the seat of Archbishop Danilo II, who in Maglič wrote his famous hagiographies and regiographies.

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Studenica Things to Do

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