Bucharest Local Customs

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Romanians friendly people

    by draguza Updated Nov 23, 2005

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    Me & Romanian friend

    Romanians are some of the most hospitable and friendly people in Europe and this was obvious throughout my stay and many visits to Bucharest. They are really nice, especially with foreigners. Romanians are a quiet, earthy, smiling people who have suffered much but have never been broken.

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    Romanian Folk Dances

    by draguza Written Oct 8, 2005

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    Romanians dancing

    Hora is the name for the large circle dance and is the most widespread dance in Romania, partly because any number of participants of both men and women, of any ability or age, can join in. The term Hora is also used for the Sunday village dance, even where the Hora dance does not form part of the dance cycle

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    Car mania

    by codrutz Written Sep 27, 2004

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    Romanian people are crazy about cars. This is a reality - name any new manufactured car and sometimes before the official launch it is in Bucharest. This is not a thing to be proud of, I'm just telling you a fact of life. There are many young people who terribly wants to show off and even if they don't have money for anything else, if they have the latest Nokia model and a nice looking car, they are satisfied.

    So car manufacturers and dealers are happy and selling like crazy. Also, on years end, companies need more profit deduction, so they come to the dealers and ask for the latest, high priced models, whatever, just to spend some profit on something that "suits" their ego :)

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  • Romanian_Bat's Profile Photo

    Habits and customs

    by Romanian_Bat Updated Sep 6, 2004

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    Sausages in the window, Baia de Fier Street

    1. Men generally shake hands, while women kiss or hug each other to greet. However it is still familiar in certain situations for men also to hug each other and this is not regarded as a sexual offence.
    2. When you want to give someone flowers, bear in mind that one flower is generally only given to the person you love, and then bigger odd numbers are welcome as a gift to anyone. Even numbers of flowers are only given to the dead. Therefore beware!
    3. When visiting churches, it is familiar for people to wear either long dresses or long trousers; shorts are traditionally not acceptable; in a church usually women are kindly asked to cover their hair with a headkerchief.
    4. When invited for a meal and you refuse because you do not eat pork, for instance, it is OK. But when invited for a drink or meal and you simply refuse, it can be taken as mistrust or as the lack of pleasure you would have to accept the offer.
    5. Romanians pay little attention to time. Do not get angry if your friend / partner / acquaintance is 10 minutes late, he/she will blame the tram, the weather, the neighbour or whatever and you will lose 10 more minutes talking in vain...
    6. When you are in Rome, act like Romans. So do not expect Bucharesters to do things as you like, rather try to understand why they are late, why they drive so madly and so on. After all, Bucharest is their home and it has not been built to please tourists. To the good and to the bad of it.

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  • gosiaPL's Profile Photo

    Candle cabinets at Stavropoleos Church

    by gosiaPL Updated May 2, 2004

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    Nice idea for candle lighting

    A completely different idea for candle lighting just outside the Stavropoleos Church.

    I've never seen such little cabinets, good protection from wind and rain. Just as at the Patriarchal Cathedral, also here people were coming in to light a candle and say a little prayer in the church.

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    Candles outside Patriarhia Romana

    by gosiaPL Updated May 1, 2004

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    Candle lighting place

    This candle lighting place is just outside the Patriarchal Cathedral. Very nice!

    I saw people coming in to light candles all the time I spent in the Patriarchal complex. It sure is a special place because the whole complex is off the main road and up the hill, but it doesn't stop Romanians from visiting it :-)

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  • lchelle's Profile Photo

    Giving flowers

    by lchelle Written Oct 7, 2003

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    If you choose to thank someone by saying it with flowers, you should be aware that certain customs surround this!!

    ALWAYS give an odd number of stems, an even number is only given at funerals.

    Romanians dont ever send flowers, they are always GIVEN.

    It is only acceptable to give women flowers. Men will be offended!

    Follow these and you cant go wrong!!

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    Peddlers in the Old Bucharest

    by ovidiu_nan Updated May 3, 2003

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    Old Bucharest Market

    The Municipal Museum of Bucharest has recently opened a distinguishing exhibition that is unique for its theme and atmosphere: peddlers and trades on the streets of former Bucharest.
    Being in general an easy occupation and rather profitable, the trade was in the hands of people who had come from abroad: Greeks, Turkeys, Armenians, Bulgarians and Jews.
    Between 1868 and 1885, Bucharest used to have only two markets: one situated in the area of nowadays Unirii Plaza (“The Big Market”) and one around Amzei church (“The Small Market”), near today’s Romana Plaza. Besides, lots of small shops and grocer shops used to sell their products in the central area. Only the rich inhabitants could afford sending their servants to the market or to the grocer’s or to command products to the stable peddler. They were delivered at their door by the special employees of the shops, generally young boys. Thus, the ambulant commerce used to be at hand of most of the citizens of Bucharest.
    Each ambulant seller was specialized in certain types of products. Generally, they were selling food: meat, vegetables, cheese, fruits, sweets, soft drinks and lots of haberdashery items. They also had measurement instruments for the merchandise they were selling. In Bucharest, the control and the marking of these instruments was done yearly by the authorities who also used to come for a fortuitously control.
    From morning till late in the evening, Bucharest was rustling with the steps, the yells and the bargains of those earning their living by selling products in the streets. Step by step, after the First World War, the authorities decided that the image of the capital should be a modern one and tried to decrease the size of the ambulant commerce. Despite their decisions, this kind of trade has lasted until these days, reminding of the times when it was one of the most picturesque aspects of Bucharest.

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  • Lucky79's Profile Photo

    ..religion...Saint Gheorghe

    by Lucky79 Written Mar 10, 2003

    He was declared saint in 1955, one the worse years for Christian faith in Romania, because of persecution by communists. Several important men of faith, monks, bishops and archbishops lived, during different periods, in the monastery. The bishops and archbishops of Bessarabia and Bucovina, exiled from their territory after annexation to Russia, were also its guests. A very important institution has been the Seminary, ans it formed many remarkable representatives of the Church. Among them is Father TEOCTIST, Patriarch of Romania, who studied for eight years in this school. At the time of the 2nd World Wat, the Seminary and monastery typography were shut down. Now, with the blessing of the Holy people, who want to follow the way of Christ, can find nurturing for their souls and become, according to their individual inclination, typographers, professors or craftsmen, while living a live of prayer. Since 1995, the Theological Seminar has been reopened. Among the younger teacher-monks, is the only professor from the old seminar, symbolic representative of the religious teaching class of the past. We remark with joy that, in work and dedication, man has not forgotten to give to God the most beautiful things, undertaking the restoration of the church, of the paintings and the construction of a new school for those who wish to walk the way of the Lord.

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  • lichinga's Profile Photo

    Romania passed through a...

    by lichinga Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Romania passed through a difficult transition period between the Ceasescu's dictatorship and Iliescu first government. The 'revolution', which began in the blood in Timisoara (North-West) spilled all over the country in a very confused series of battles, where the fighting parties were no clear at all. The picture shows the former headquarters of the Romanian Communist Party, where Ceasescu tried to deliver his last speech, while being boohed by the people.
    In the left corner, a small building may be noticed: it remained unrepaired as it is considered a permanent symbol of those bloddy days. The building is supposed to be one of the hidden places where the secret police (Securitate) brought the people.

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  • cheekymarieh's Profile Photo

    Traditional souvenirs from the...

    by cheekymarieh Written Sep 7, 2002

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    Traditional souvenirs from the country include: embroidered blouses, frosted and gilded glassware, wooden miniatures, embroidered tablecloths, lace, icons and hand-woven textiles. For those VT'ers like Richie and I the thing to take home is tuica (plum brandy).

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    From January 1, 2001, citizens...

    by cheekymarieh Written Sep 7, 2002

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    From January 1, 2001, citizens of EU member countries no longer need visas to enter Romania. Your passport will be stamped, and you will be entitled to stay for up to 60 days in Romania free of charge. If you an American, you can stay 30 days visa-free, while citizens of Australia and New Zealand still need visas (obtainable at the border).

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  • Varvarino's Profile Photo

    Like many other cultures...

    by Varvarino Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    Like many other cultures around the world, we have great respect for our elders. If you see an older squi...I mean, person...having difficulty, you may want to offer to assist them. This is a picture of bunicut (pronounced boonicoots), my grandpa. He is a very, very old squirrel (my father's father). His hair is all white! And, just like some old people, he...shrunk a bit. (Thank you lovey)

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  • This is an absolute must-see: ...

    by tiganeasca Written Aug 25, 2002

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    This is an absolute must-see: if you cannot get out of Bucharest, visit the Village Museum (Muzeul Satului). It's on the far north side of the city on several hundred acres. Homes, churches, farms, and all sorts of other buildings from throughout the country were disassembled, shipped to Bucharest, and reas-sembled here. The museum is a pleasure to visit and, for those who don't have the time to get out into the country, offers an excellent opportunity to see what life is like elsewhere in Romania. You can see how the architecture differs from place to place, what ordinary life is/was like, and glean a helpful understanding of Romania. It is one of the best examples of a living museum I have seen anywhere in the world and it is an absolute must-see for all visitors.
    Location: Soseaua Kiseleff, 28-30 (directly north of the city on the main road leading into/out of town.
    More Info: Tel. (40) 1 222-9110 or you can visit their helpful website. Their e-mail address is muzeulsatului@cimec.ro

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Keeping "farm" animals in the city

    by mvtouring Written Jan 21, 2007

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    Do not be alarmed when you stay in a B&B in the city or one of the suburbs and the neighbours have lots of chickens and geese running around.

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Bucharest Local Customs

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