Fun things to do in Bucharest

  • Senate (Former Comunist Party Building)
    Senate (Former Comunist Party Building)
    by Airpunk
  • Parliament Palace at night
    Parliament Palace at night
    by Airpunk
  • Parliament Palace, Bucharest
    Parliament Palace, Bucharest
    by Airpunk

Most Viewed Things to Do in Bucharest

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    Lupa Capitalina

    by Airpunk Updated Sep 29, 2013

    This copy of the famous Roman bronze sculpture was presented to Bucharest by the city of Rome in 1906. It was a gift to celebrated the 40th throne anniversary of King Charles I as well as the 1800th anniversary of the arrival of the Romans in the region. What is interesting about this sculpture: It has been moved around in the city more than any other. Around a dozen of times, it was relocated to other places – not counting the times when it was removed for restoration or stolen by pranksters. The statue was placed on its current spot at Piata Roma in 2010.

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    Prince Mihai Monastery

    by Airpunk Written Sep 21, 2013

    This little monastery is an exception as it was not demolished by the communist regime, but instead moved in the 1980s to make place for Ceaucescu's concrete buildings. Still, it is well hidden behind them. Prince Mihai Monastery was built in 1598 and once stood on a hill overlooking the city.

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    Lipscani

    by Airpunk Written Sep 18, 2013

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    ...got its name from Strada Lipscani (Leipzig Street) and is what you call the old town in Bucharest. It lacks what you would expect in a European city: Town Hall, large church and the one or other monument. Only the ruins of the Princely Court are an exception. What makes the area interesting is the high concentration of 19th century buildings which have been untouched by Ceaucescus city planners.
    Lipscani is known for its nightlife and is full with bars, pubs, cafés and restaurants. It is well visited day and night and you'll surely find a place which suits your taste. Even if you don't want to eat or drink something, it is work to walk through the streets. It is nice to see a recently refurbished house next to one left into decay or another currently being rebuilt in its old splendour again.

    Between Calea Victoriei, University Square and Unirii Square. Unirii is the closest Metro station, though for some of the northern streets, Universitate can be more convenient.

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    Majestic Complex and Atatürk Bust

    by Airpunk Written Sep 18, 2013

    Here we have one of the most splendid 19th century buildings complex – not to say “Majestic”. Most of it is occupied by the Majestic Hotel. The theatre, where the Odeon Cinema is located right now, was added in 1911.
    In front of it, you will see a bust of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. I thought that Atatürk had a special connection to the city, but found none. Later, I found out that the personality cult of Atatürk was not limited to Turkey, but even reached my home country of Venezuela in the mid-20th century.

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    Biserica Zlatari

    by Airpunk Written Sep 18, 2013

    Zlatari Church (The Goldsmiths' church) at Victoriei Avenue was built in 1705, replacing a wooden predecessor building. It was repaired and altered after several earthquakes in the 19th century with the biggest alteration having taken place in 1903. The 1940 earthquake destroyed the spire which was rebuilt in the 1970s. Shortly afterwards, the neighbouring flat blocks were added which took over most of the former church square and dwarfed the church. The frequent alterations and damages have led to the fact that few original items in the interior remain. This goes also for the beautiful painting at the ceiling of the porch.

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    Pasajul Macca-Vilacrosse

    by Airpunk Written Sep 18, 2013

    Catalan architect Xavier Vilacrosse built an inn in the mid-19th century which was pulled down just some decades later and replaced by the current buildings. This complex gives you the idea of a 19th century shopping mall from Paris. Basically, it is made up of two streets covered with a a 19th century glass and iron structure. The name Macca comes fro his brother in law which was involved in the design as well. It has a couple of shops and cafés but can not compete with modern mall. In the communist years, it was called Pasajul Bijuteria ("Jewelry Store Passage") before it got back its old name in 1990.

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    Romanian Architects Association

    by Airpunk Written Sep 18, 2013

    A strange, but creative way to deal with an old ruin. The Romanian Architect Association has turned this 19th century building into their headquarters – by using the outer walls of the ruin and planting a glass and steel building inside. The beautiful building was once the seat of the less beautiful Securitate secret police which terrorized millions of Romanians. It was destroyed in the 1989 revolution leaving only the outer walls intact. In 2003, the controversial building was finished. Soe locals like it, some not – it definitively has my approval.

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    St. Anthony's Square and former church

    by Airpunk Written Sep 13, 2013

    One of the oldest churches in Bucharest became victim to a fire in 1847. On its former spot, a little park was installed. A monument in shape of the church was placed on the former sport of the it. Unfortunately, the place is now located in the backyard of a flat block. That means that is it looks tucked away and not well kept.

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    Patriarchal Cathedral and Cathedral Hill

    by Airpunk Updated Sep 13, 2013

    This is the religious centre of Romania and god knows how this place was not pulled down to make place for another concrete building. It is only taken out of sight by the flat blocks of Unirii Sqaure. The cathedral was built from 1659 on, later a building complex grew around it which included a monastery and several buildings for local authorities. The cathedral was refurbished in 1839 and 1962. Inside the building, there are mostly 20th century items, even the frescoes are from 1933. Pictures inside are unfortunately forbidden – officially, pictures outside as well, but nobody cares about the. The bishop's see is expected to move into the new Cathedral close to the Parliamental Palace once that one is completed.
    The hill is often known as Cathedral Hill or Patriarchal Hill. Sometimes, you can here the chants of the monks from the monastery. As one of the buildings is the old parliament, this spot has seen also the proclamation of an independent Romania in 1878. When you walk up, don't forget to note the beautiful mansion on the left hand side.

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    Bucharest City Museum (Sutu Palace)

    by Airpunk Written Sep 13, 2013

    What is now the Bucharest City Museum was once a palace built for foreign minister Costache Sutu. Finished in 1834, it was the home of splendid yet notorious parties. It was refurbished in 1958 and finally re-opened as the Bucharest City Museum in 1959.

    There is little information in English. However, if you like to see 19th century items, old photographs and city maps from past decades, this is the right place for you. And don't forget that there's also the building itself to enjoy. It has an interesting mix of Neogothic, Neoclassicist and Art Nouveau – styles. With 6 lei (2013) the entry fee is more than worth the visit.

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    Museum of Contemporary Art (MNAC)

    by Airpunk Written Sep 9, 2013

    Located in the Parliament palace, this good modern art museum has frequently changing exhibitions. The exhibition space goes over four floors with an additional floor with a bar/café on top. With that concept however, the quality of your visit depends a lot on the quality of exhibitions going on. I especially liked the one about contemporary art in China, the others were Mircea Cantor and Women in Art. I just had the impression that they have a lot of unused space. As the museum is located in a part of the parliament palace the dimensions of the exhibition rooms are pretty huge as well.
     
    Entry fee is 10 lei, discounts for children and students (2013). Photography is generally permitted, exceptions for single exhibitions may apply. Unusual for a museum in Bucharest, there is no photo permit fee. The museum is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

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    KILOMETRE 0 - OR - MILE ZERO

    by DAO Updated Aug 9, 2013

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    They say all roads lead to Rome. Well in Romania, they all start right here in the courtyard of the New Saint George Church (Sf. Gheorghe Nou). The marker itself is a remarkable massive iron globe has the signs of the Zodiac across its ‘Equator’ and sits inside a massive marble circle. The sides of the marble are engraved with the names of the major cities and regions of Romania and their distances from Kilometre Zero. The sculpture was created by artist Constantin Baraski in 1938 and has several towns listed that are now part of an independent Moldova.

    Don’t even think about climbing on it. There is a warning sign that it is illegal to do so.

    You may just want to ask why Kilometre Zero starts in a Church courtyard not on a road and why pagan Zodiac symbols are on it.

    I don’t know either.

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    Walk and walk

    by littlebush Written Jun 17, 2012

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    Old town-nice old narrow streets full of bars, cafes, restaurants.
    Theres some old churches down that way too.
    Cismigiu garden near the centre is a nice peaceful park with waterways to relax in.
    Or even bigger and more nice is Herastrau park with its lake for boating and flowered gardens, great place to relax.
    The Arc de Triomphe is worth seeing.
    Walk along Victorei street for a view on city life from the old to the new.
    Eat in some of the great cafes.

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    Muzeul National Al Satalui Dimitrie Gusti

    by MikeBird Written Jun 9, 2012

    This Museum features examples of buildings and structures taken from all regions of Romania. They are mainly houses and functional buildings removed and then reconstructed within very pleasant park surroundings in the middle of Bucharest. There are explanatory noticeboards outside each of the structures which include peasant homes, churches, windmills, farmyard barns and there is even a manually powered ferris wheel with room for 4 children!

    I thought this museum was excellent. Good information, really well laid out in very pleasant surroundings; not overly commercialised and very clean and tidy.

    Entrance fee is 6Lei for adults. Guidebooks are available.

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    Biblioteca Universitară din București

    by yvgr Updated Apr 6, 2012

    The Central University Library of Bucharest (Romanian: Biblioteca Centrală Universitară) is a library in central Bucharest, located across the street from the National Museum of Art of Romania. Built 1864.

    The library can be visited
    from Tuesday to Thursday,
    between 10.00 - 14.00 hrs

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