Museum of the Romanian Peasant, Bucharest

4 out of 5 stars 12 Reviews

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  • Museum of the Romanian Peasant
    Museum of the Romanian Peasant
    by Airpunk
  • Museum of the Romanian Peasant
    Museum of the Romanian Peasant
    by Airpunk
  • Museum of the Romanian Peasant
    by Vanity666
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    Museum of the Romanian Peasant

    by Airpunk Written Sep 9, 2013
    Museum of the Romanian Peasant
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    This museum is often recommended and seems to be high regarded by locals. In my opinion however, it is far overrated and surely does not meet everyone's taste.
     
    Most exhibitions are not easily to understand, as they lack explanations. In many cases, there are not even Romanian ones. So most of the time, you just walk through the large exhibition rooms, look at old items related to rural life and guess for yourself why that particular item has made it into the exhibition. There are some interesting exhibits like a church made of crude wooden planks or some watermills in the first floor. The often mentioned exhibition about grandmothers was not there any more. In the basement, there was an exhibition about collectivistaion of agriculture in the 1950s. This looked to be interesting, but the few explanations that were available to this one were in Romanian.
     
    The museum is not bad and the price of 8 lei more than fair for the size of the exhibition. The photo permit of 60 lei (all prices as of 2013) is completelys out of size. However, you should not arrive with high expectations.
     

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    Museum of the Romanian Peasant

    by surudream Updated Apr 4, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Romanian Peasant Museum

    The building of The Museum of the Romanian Peasant, placed in Victoriei Square, was built in almost 30 years, from 1912 until 1941.
    Having 8000sq.m., the Museum of the Romanian Peasant is the host for many collections, like pottery collection, costumes collection, interior decoration collection, wood, furniture and ironwork collection and religious objects and rites.
    The museum has also a shop from where the visitors can buy different objects.

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    Museum of the Romanian Peasant

    by msocolin Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Museum of the romanian peasant

    The Museum of the Romanian Peasant (Muzeul Taranului Român) was the only museum I could visit during my short stay in Bucharest. It was very interesting. The museum is in an exceptional building in new Romanian style. In display are a lot of objects of the romanian culture such as wooden elements, pottery, costumes, textiles, and even an original wooden church. It's really interesting if you want to learn something about the romanian culture and history.

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    The Peasnat Museum

    by edvin_br Updated Apr 4, 2011
    The museum at Kiseleff boulevard

    The museum was founded on 5 February 1990 and today its considered to one of the best museums of the country (voted to the European Museum of the year in 1996). At the museum you can learn a lot about the Romanian history and on the local customs of the locals.
    The building erected in 1912 following the plans of arch. N.Ghica-Budesti.

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    Museum of Romanian Peasant

    by Andraf Updated Sep 28, 2010

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    Museum of Romanian Peasant, Bucharest
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    The Museum of Romanian Peasant is one of my favourite museums in Bucharest. It houses, as the name suggests, a large collection of objects used by Romanian peasants: pottery, textiles, traditional costumes, icons and other religious artifacts, pieces of furniture, carpets etc as well as photographs documenting the customs of rural life. In one of the galleries you can see a wooden church and in another a wooden peasant house. They also have some beautiful "troite" (crosses placed at crossroads or at the edge of a village). The museum was founded in 1906 under the name of Ethnographic and National Art Museum and was housed temporarily at another location. Construction to the present building started in 1912, was stopped in 1916 and restarted in 1932. It was completed in 1941, 29 years after it was started. The building is the project of architect Nicolae Ghika Budeşti who designed it as an illustration of the neo-Romanian style, very popular in Bucharest at the beginning of the 20th century. In 1953, the communists “liberated” the building, turning it into a museum dedicated to the history of the Communist Party and sending the collection away. In 1990, after the Romanian Revolution, the collection returned home.

    What makes this museum special is the way the collection is displayed, less like a museum and more like an art gallery. Objects are not behind glass cases but displayed freely and the display information is hand written on pieces of paper or illustrated by sketches. This somehow cuts the distance between the viewer and the objects, making the impact of the displays greater, more personal. It’s certainly different than other museums I’ve been to. The vision belongs to the museum’s first director after 1990, painter Horia Bernea, and to one of his main collaborators Irina Nicolau. Under their guidance the Museum of Romanian Peasant won the the European Museum of the Year Award in 1996, the first museum in Eastern Europe to be granted this honor.

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    Muzeul Taranului Roman

    by Vanity666 Written Sep 17, 2009

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    Opened in 1906, the museum features the richest folk art collection in Romania, with over 90,000 artifacts that trace the colorful and diverse cultural life of the Romanian people. The Pottery Collection includes some 18,000 items, representative of the most important pottery centres in the country. The oldest ceramic item found in the museum bears the inscription 1746. Equally impressive, the Costume Collection comprises almost 20,000 traditional folk costumes, some dating from the beginning of the 19th century, giving visitors insight into the styles and traditions of the Romanian peasants.

    The displays dip into all aspects of life in the Romanian countryside. Exhibits of agricultural tools, carpets, icons, furniture, photographs and films build up a complete picture of Romanian folk culture. In one of the galleries, you can see a wooden church and in another, a wooden peasant house. Four more wooden churches stand in the outdoor museum area. In 1996, the museum was named European Museum of the Year. Visitors can buy regional handcrafts and textiles in the museum's extensive gift shop.

    Open: Tue. - Sun. 10:00am - 6:00pm; Closed Mon.
    Admission charge

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    Museum of The Romanian Peasant

    by Delia_Madalina Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    The Tree with Crosses - Local Custom
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    Describing this museum is a hard task because it would mean to describe a feeling - I'm not creative enough as to do that.

    Among the collection you will see here I'd like to name the collection of religious icons on wood and glass, the pottery collection and the traditional costumes collection. Besides this, you will also be offered an insight about traditions, symbols and local customs. I should mention here the fact that the museum's collections are delivered under the symbol of the cross - Romania is a Christian Orthodox country after all.

    My special places here: the house rebuilt within one of the museum's halls and the water -mill also rebuilt there.

    It won the EMYA (European Museum of the Year Award), but the award itself is not as important as the reason behind. It's a place that makes you feel like home. It was designed in a way that the visitor can understand the Romanian spirit of the peasant.

    Entrance fees:
    -general fee : 6 RON - a little 2 EURO
    -students, retired persons : 2 RON - a little under 1 EURO
    - EURO 26 Card owners: 3 RON

    Guidance:
    - audio guide: 10 RON = ~ 3 EURO
    - guide for groups under 10 persons: 60 RON/group =~18 EURO
    - guide for groups over 10 persons: 100 RON/group =~ 30 EURO
    (for the guided tours you should book in advance)

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    Great Buildings - The Peasant Museum

    by Romanian_Bat Written Jan 4, 2008

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    The Peasant Museum - the main entrance
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    This museum is devoted to the Romanian peasant’s habits, works, and art sense. It contains over 90,000 exhibits of folk art, from ceramics and icons to funerary monuments and outfits. One of the most interesting exhibits is "the house in the house", as they have re-created an old traditional house inside the museum. The building hosting it was designed by Architect Ghika-Budesti and it raised in 1912-1941. It was built in Neoromanian style, with obvious Brancoveanu elements. Its style harmoniously blends traditional feudal architecture elements from Wallachia and Moldavia.

    To the back of the museum there is a wooden church and a relaxing terrace. The institution was designed “the best European Museum of the Year” in 1996 by the European Council. The museum also hosts one of the best shops in the city selling traditional items and souvenirs; especially the pottery and the glass painted icons are excellent here. It is open daily 10.00-18.00, closed on Mondays.

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    Museum of the Romanian Peasant

    by iwys Updated Dec 8, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    As almost any citizen of Bucharest will tell you, Muzeul Taranului Roman, the Museum of the Romanian Peasant won the European Museum of the Year award in 1996. It is good, but I'm not sure it is THAT good. One thing that puts me off the place slightly is the extortianate rate they charge for taking a camera into the museum.

    Romania has the richest peasant culture in Europe. The thousands of exhibits show an incredibly rich variety of architecture, handicrafts, costumes and art. My favourite exhibit was a large log cabin. There is also a wooden church in the back yard.

    Admission: 6 ron
    Camera: 50 ron!

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    Museum of the Romanian Peasant

    by codrutz Written Feb 25, 2007

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    The Museum of the Romanian Peasant is a very interesting place to visit in Bucharest, as it shows a large collection of original textiles (clothes and costumes), icons, ceramics and other artifacts of Romanian peasant life. Its collection sums over 100,000 objects. One of the nicest exibit inside is the house-in-house, which is an actual house interior from Gorj county, and some parts of the exterior of the house. This house was brought here from Gorj but was taken outside to the Village Museum by the communist party, it returned to the Peasant Museum in 2002.

    The museum was first opened in 1930 but in the communist era (until 1990) the building housed a museum representing the communist party. Currently, there is still a room at the basement displaying ironically some of the items from that period of the museum. Another interesting fact is that the building is placed on the former site of the State Mint. This museum was designated the "European Museum of the Year" in 1996.

    Opening hours: 10-18 all week excepting Mondays

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    Romanian Peasant Museum

    by mvtouring Written Jan 15, 2007

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    Some 90,000 items, ranging from traditional costumes and textiles to ceramics and icons, are on view here, at the first museum in Eastern Europe to receive the European Museum of the Year award (1996). Information in English is available in each room. A shop sells traditional crafts. COST: 80¢, $4.60 camera or video fee. OPEN: Tues.-Sun. 10-6.

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    Peasant Museum (Muzeul Taranului Roman)

    by Dabs Written Jun 6, 2005

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    The guidebooks said this the best museum in Bucharest and one of the best in the country and it was voted the European Museum of the year in 1996 so we headed here on our last day in Bucharest.

    The exhibits are well laid out, you can find cards in most of the rooms with descriptions in several languages. There are two wooden churches and a cottage from the northern region of the country on display, one of the churches is outside. Displays in the rooms include Romanian clothes, pottery, stained glass icons and a full Romanian classroom.

    In the basement of the museum is the Communist Iconography Museum with paintings of Stalin, bust of Lenin and portraits of some dictator I don't recognize, perhaps Ceausescu's predecessor.

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