Stavropoloes Church, Bucharest

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  • Stavropoleos Church, Bucharest
    Stavropoleos Church, Bucharest
    by Airpunk
  • Stavropoloes Church
    by tim07
  • Stavropoloes Church
    by tim07
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    Stavropoleos Church

    by Airpunk Written Sep 18, 2013
    Stavropoleos Church, Bucharest

    It was finished in 1730 and is richly decorated with icons. Like many of Bucharest's old churches, it is pretty small. It was part of a nunnery which was dissolved. Outside, it is one of very few churches that has preserved at the outer walls. The inner court (completed in 1997!) is nice to look at, especially in spring/summer when they have a lot of flowers inside. Don't forget to have a look at the old tombstones.

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    The inner courtyard of Stavropoleos Church

    by Andraf Updated Sep 25, 2010

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    Inner courtyard, Stavopoleos church
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    Alongside the Stavropoleos church there is a small beautiful yard surrounded by a porticoes on three sides. This building has been added during the restoration done in 1899-1901 by architect Ion Mincu and if you look closely you’ll notice that the porticoes are inspired by the architecture of the church. This building shelters a library with a collection of old manuscripts, a refectory where conferences are held, and a collection of 18th century religious objects, some of them brought here from other churches and monasteries that were demolished in the communist years. The convent’s caretakers also work to restore old books, icons, other liturgical objects and clothes, to translate old books and to transcribe old musical scores digitally. The church is also famous for its choir which sings Byzantine music. I really like the courtyard with its old tombstones and fragments of old sculptures. I’ve seen it in many types of weather, on a sunny morning or under grey skies, when it was snowing or when it was raining and it always looks beautiful and has a peaceful and quiet feel.

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    Stavropoleos Church (Biserica Stavropoleos)

    by Andraf Updated Sep 25, 2010

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    Interior of Stavropoleos Church, Bucharest
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    This charming small church is one of the oldest and most beautiful in Bucharest. It was built between the years 1724 to 1730 during the ruling of Nicolae Mavrocordat (Prince of Wallachia 1719-1730) by the Greek monk Ioanichie Stratonikeas. Although tiny, every little detail is worth looking at: the richly adorned columns of the porch, the exterior paintings and carvings, the wooden door. I think it’s impossible to visit churches like Stavropoleos and not be moved in some way – I’m actually not sure that my photos do it justice, because it truly is one of a kind. In the past, the church was the centerpiece of a complex which included an inn and a monastery which was sustained from the incomes of the inn. They were demolished at the end of 19th century after being severely damaged during a fire, the church being the only part that remains from the original complex. Today the church is part of the Stavropoleos Monastery, an Eastern Orthodox convent. Stavropoleos is representative for the Brâncovenesc style which blends Ottoman and Western elements together with traditional Romanian architectural forms.

    Inside you’ll find the same fresco-covered walls and golden iconostasis found in most Eastern Orthodox churches but somehow they look more exceptional here. If you are Christian you’ll feel like the church interior encourages prayer and meditation. Even the tourists leave their cameras aside and sit quiet on the little benches. The black silhouette that you see in my photo of the interior is of one of the nun caretakers who was tending the candles.

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    Stavropoleos Church

    by monica71 Written Mar 6, 2008

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    Exterior of the Church
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    This is one of the country's most lively churches. The church (it is a monastery today) is small, but breath taking! It was built in 1724 by Ioanikie Stratonikeas (frescoed on the left as you enter the church), a Greek monk who came to Bucharest to raise funds for his hometown monastery.
    Today, it's in the hands of five hardworking nuns; they look after an impressive library with a collection of old manuscripts and spend time transcribing Cyrillic musical scores electronically. For one of the best introductions to Orthodox church symbolism, ask to see the exhibition of icons and liturgical objects which the nuns have laid out to simulate a traditional church plan. The nuns will explain the meaning of each icon and elaborate on its particular significance.
    If you have the time, plan to attend Mass here; rites are held every morning (7:30am) when the choir consists of female voices, while on Wednesdays at 4:30pm, it's an all-male performance of the Byzantine-style chorus.

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    Stavropoleos Church

    by iwys Updated Nov 18, 2007

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    Biserica Stavropoleos was built by Archimandrite Ioanichie in 1724. Inside it there are some beautiful frescoes. Of the original monastery and inn buildings, only the church has been preserved. It represents one of the most outstanding examples of the Brincoveanu style.

    The outer buildings and courtyard were added by Romanian architect Ion Mincu in 1897.

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    Stavropoleos church

    by yumyum Written Oct 28, 2007

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    The beginnings of this church go back to the Greek monk and later metropolit of Stravropolis Joannikis who gave the order to build a chapel around 1730. At the beginning of the 20th century the formerly modest church was renovated and today it’s the only one in Bucharest with outside paintings.

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    Stavropoleos Church

    by hydronetta Written Jun 11, 2007
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    Lying in downtown Bucharest, Stavropoleos Church is located in street with the same name. It was built between 1724-1730 by the Phanariot Nicolae Mavrocordat (Phanari is a location in nowadays Istanbul). It is very different in looks as it has an arabesque facade, elegant columns. When we visited it was under restoration. The interior was peaceful, nicely decorated (but no photo are avalable as the was a liturgy going on by the nuns.

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    Stavropoleos Church (Biserica Stravrapoleos),

    by mvtouring Updated Jan 15, 2007

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    Built in 1724, this beautiful church is one of Bucharest's oldest. Lovely wooden and stone carvings and religious paintings adorn the exterior of this church, built between 1724 and 1730. Inside are fresco-covered walls and dome plus an icon-filled gold-leaf iconostasis. OPEN: Daily 6 AM-7 PM.

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    Stavropoleos Church

    by surudream Updated Apr 12, 2005

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    Stavropoleos Church

    Greek monk Ioanikie Stratonikeas built Stavropoleos Church in 1724 during of the Nicolae Mavrocordat reign. The land, which was built the ensemble, belonged to Despa, the widow of Carstea Popescu merchant. On April 6th 1722, the monk Ioanichie buys the land called, during that time, The Slum of the Ghiormei Banul Church, dew to the fact that this slum was across from that church. Born in Ostanitza village, in Greek Macedonia, Ioanichie built, at the beginning, an inn with a chapel and a lovely house. Earning a lot of money with the inn, the monk Ioanichie, having an experience team of workers, started to built in 1724 a church that became so famous for its beauty that the Patriarch Eremia made him Mitropolitan of the Stavropoleos Church. Becoming the Metropolitan of the church, his fame and respect are raising. Dew to that fact the church will receive many donations like estates, vineyards and money. Being a good manager, between 1729 and 1733, the former monk will embellish the church by adding the porch formed by 6 carved stone columns. This porch, through its beauty, equals the carved porch from Mogosoaia Palace. Although small, the church has an artistic value through its carving stone and inside and outside drawings. Also, another value is the carved wooden door and the princely chair.
    After the founder's death, the church felt in ruins, being renovated between 1904 and 1908 by the Romanian architect Ioan Mincu. In the courtyard was gathered a curious collection of tombstones dating from the 18th century.
    Stavropoleos Church represents an artistic contribution of the Romanians to the world patrimony, being called by the greater Romanian savant Nicolae Iorga "work of supreme harmony".
    see more pictures from here...

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  • gosiaPL's Profile Photo

    Stavropoleos Church courtyard

    by gosiaPL Updated Apr 30, 2004

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    My loveliest bit of Bucharest

    You know what I mean? :-)
    I really adore this courtyard! The columns, the tombstones, and the outdoor paintings.
    I'm not quite sure if there is a little female convent by the church or whether the orthodox nuns that I saw passing through the yard were only caretakers.

    I was lucky it was a nice and sunny morning - perfect weather to explore that courtyard, and a perfect place to be in on a sunny morning :-)

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    The beautiful Stavropoleos Church

    by gosiaPL Updated Apr 30, 2004

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    Stavropoleos Church beauty

    The warm and charming Biserica Stavropoleos is one of the oldest in Bucharest, built in 1724-1730 under the supervision of the Greek monk Ioanikie Stratonikeas. The richly adorned columns in the porch, the exterior paintings and carvings, and the sweet relaxed side courtyard make it my favourite memory of Bucharest.

    The church is tiny but remarkable! A perfect example of the Brancovenesc style which blends Ottoman and Western elements together with traditional Romanian forms. The wood and stone carvings as well as the frescoes may need loads of money and effort for restoration, but their overall beauty will not go unnoticed. The gold-leaf decorated interior and beautiful icons add to the church's exceptionality.
    Be sure to explore the lovely courtyard with beautiful columns and a collection of 18th c. old tombstones! Check the pics in this travelogue.

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    The Stavropoleos Church. ...

    by tiganeasca Written Aug 25, 2002

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    The Stavropoleos Church. Follow your map to this small but exquisite gem. It was built in 1724 and is in many ways a representative Romanian Orthodox Church. Though tiny, every detail is worth your notice or attention; the carvings and decorations are nothing short of wonderful, in the old-fashioned sense: 'full of wonder.' I think it is impossible to see churches like this and not feel a true sense of awe. To the side of the church itself are monks' cells and even a tiny museum. There are even ancient gravestones, probably unreadable for centuries.
    Eastern Orthodox rites and rituals are largely unknown to those of us raised in the 'West,' but you do yourself a serious disservice if you avoid the churches out of ignorance. Learn something about their beliefs and practices and see how stunning some of the churches can be: one thing is certain, it is virtually impossible to enter an Orthodox Church in Romania without getting a strong and immediate sense of deep and profound faith.

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