Monuments & Buildings, Moscow

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  • MBIC - Naberezhnaya Tower
    MBIC - Naberezhnaya Tower
    by HORSCHECK
  • Moscow International Business Centre
    Moscow International Business Centre
    by HORSCHECK
  • MBIC - Metro station Mezhdunarodnaya
    MBIC - Metro station Mezhdunarodnaya
    by HORSCHECK
  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Pashkov house

    by kris-t Written Nov 28, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pashkov house

    Favorite thing: At the end of Mokhovaya Street one can see a beautiful building of white stone, known as the Pashkov House. It was built by the best Moscow architect, Bajenov, by order of a rich landowner Pashkov.
    There are a lot of legends about it, and according to one of them there is a secret passage to the Kremlin under the house.
    In the middle of the 19th century the Rumyantsev Museum was organized in the house. Rumyantsev had collected books since his childhood. He gave money for different expeditions, and by the end of his life had gathered a large collection of ancient coins and rare manuscripts. He wanted the museum to become a Russian national museum, but unfortunately, the Count didn’t live to see it. Still, the museum did not stop enriching its collections. Tsar Alexander II offered it the famous painting “Appearance of Christ before the People” by Ivanov and some other works from the Hermitage in Saint-Petersburg.
    After the Revolution the museum was closed and its paintings and sculptures were given to the Tretyakov Art Gallery and to the Museum of Fine Arts. The collection of books served as the basis for the Russian State Library that is located in the Pashokov House.

    Fondest memory: Now After a 14-year hiatus, RF Culture Minister Mikhail Shvydkoi and the Russian State Library announced the launch of a full-scale renovation of the moribund Pashkov House

    Related to:
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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    the changing face of Moscow

    by MrBill Updated Jan 17, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    changing face of Moscow

    Favorite thing: There is no doubt about it, the look and feel of Moscow is changing quickly, mostly because of a lot of redevelopment of older buildings, which are being torn (or burnt) down to make room for newer, and bigger ones.

    Part of this trend is being driven by city hall and their family members that also own the biggest construction firm in Moscow. Technically, most of the land is not owned, but leased from the City of Moscow. However, this land trades on a murkish market, where present tenants suddenly find they have very few rights. For example, if a building is declared by city inspectors to be unsound, it may be torn down and a new one built. Of course, the current tenants have no right to live in the new building, and are instead resettled to outlying areas.

    Fondest memory: There is a mini-industry of workers that go around doing structural inspections and repairs, but many suspect they are deliberately undermining sound foundations and roofs to make them uninhabitable and therefore subject to redevelopment. The local politicians and their cronies can then benefit handsomely from this construction.

    Also in Moscow, bribes can account for up to two thirds of the price of a new building. The building code is so labryntine that it is basically impossible to follow all the regulations. Therefore, in order to complete a building on time and on budget, certain public figures are bribed. This can have disasterous consequences if the building is unsound because corners had to be cut in order to pay for the bribes and still remain competitive. This is suspected in the collapse of the water park last year killing hundreds and injuring more. No one yet, except the Turkish construction company has been charged. Whatever their role, they certainly were not the only ones who are to blame for this accident.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Work Abroad
    • Study Abroad

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  • luiggi's Profile Photo

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    by luiggi Written Nov 20, 2004
    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Favorite thing: Eight skyscrapers were planned and seven built, forming a ring in the center of Moscow. Often called the "Seven Sisters," they are:

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
    The Hotel Ukraine
    The Moscow State University Tower
    Kotelnicheskaya Naberezhnaya
    Kudrinskaya Square
    Leningradskaya Hotel
    Red Gate Square

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Klod5's Profile Photo

    Galerie Tretiakov

    by Klod5 Written Nov 10, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Pavel Tretiakov, riche marchand et fabricant de textile, commença à acheter des oeuvres d'artistes russes en 1856 et s'intéressa aux Ambulants.

    Sa collection pris de l'importance, il décida d'agrandir son hôtel particulier et d'en faire un musée.

    En 1892, il fit don de son musée privé d'art russe à la ville de Moscou et dirigea la galerie pendant les 6 dernières années de sa vie. Son frère, Sergueï, légua également un certain nombre d'œuvres et de nombreuses collections privées furent nationalisées par le régime soviétique.

    C'est actuellement la plus grande collection d'art russe du monde. L'étonnante façade, réalisée d'après les dessins de l'artiste Victor Vasnetsov, est ornée en son centre d'un bas-relief représentant Saint-Georges et le dragon. Une aile supplémentaire fut ajoutée à la galerie en 1930.

    Pavel Tretiakov, rich merchant and manufacturer of textile, began to buy Russian artist works in 1856 and were interested in the Itinerant.

    His collection took the importance, it decided to enlarge his particular hotel and to make a museum of it.

    In 1892, he made grant of his private museum of Russian art in the city of Moscow and directed the gallery during the last 6 years of his life. His brother, Sergueï, also bequeathed a certain number of works and numerous private collections were nationalized by the soviet regime.

    It is currently the biggest collection of Russian art of the world. The astonish facade, achieved according to the drawings of artist Victor Vasnetsov, is decorated in its center of a bas-relief representing Saint - Georges and the dragon. A supplementary wing was added to the gallery in 1930.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    Architecture ~ Polytechnical Museum

    by Canadienne Updated Oct 23, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Polytechnical Museum

    Favorite thing: A stunning example of Russian Revivalist architecture, the Polytechnical Museum was built in 1877.

    Although the museum is open (displays on science and technology), we didn't enter. We were far more interested in admiring the exterior decoration.

    Fondest memory: The variety of architecture in Moscow ~ old and new ~ was fascinating. Add good weather and good walking shoes to this. . .suddenly you have the prime ingredients of my ideal vacation (and my mom's, too).

    Please see my Architectural Treasures travelogue, for some photos of buildings (other than the ones in the tips) that caught our attention.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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  • gussymons's Profile Photo

    Stalin's Nose

    by gussymons Written Jul 3, 2003
    Stalin without a nose

    Favorite thing: At the statue park next to Gorki Park there is a haunting figure of Stalin in polished stone with a massive display of skulls behind him, presumably representing the purges he carried out in the name of communism in the 1930s.

    Interestingly, his face has been vandalised, and his nose has been chopped off. I don't know if you can see this from an enlargement of the picture opposite or not.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Sylva's Profile Photo

    State Historical Museum

    by Sylva Written Oct 21, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    State Historical Museum
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    Favorite thing: The impressive building of State Historical Museum can be found at "Krasnaya ploshchad" - the Red square.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Streets of Moscow

    by kris-t Updated Apr 7, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    a quay
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: The Stalinist-era constructions, usually in the central city, are massive and usually ornamented with Socialist realism motifs that imitate Classical themes.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Streets of Moscow

    by kris-t Updated Apr 7, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Moscow

    Favorite thing: The Stalinist-era constructions, usually in the central city, are massive and usually ornamented with Socialist realism motifs that imitate Classical themes.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

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  • drolkar's Profile Photo

    STALIN-ERA ARCHITECTURE FROM...

    by drolkar Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: STALIN-ERA ARCHITECTURE FROM THE 1930s presents an imposing image on Moscow's skyline.

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  • drolkar's Profile Photo

    In PUSHKIN SQUARE you will...

    by drolkar Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In PUSHKIN SQUARE you will find this contemplative statue of the great Russian poet...

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