Behavior & Superstitions, Moscow

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  • Behavior & Superstitions
    by Muscovite
  • Behavior & Superstitions
    by Muscovite
  • Behavior & Superstitions
    by Muscovite
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    Russian visa – consulates abroad

    by Muscovite Updated Mar 12, 2015

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    To find out about visa formalities just contact the Russian embassy in your country

    Australia
    78 Canberra Avenue, Griffith, ACT 2603
    (+612) 6295-9033

    France
    40-50, Boulevard Lannes, 75116 Paris
    (+331) 45-04-0550

    Germany
    Unter den Linden, 63-65, 10117 Berlin
    (+49-30) 229-11-10
    (+49-30) 229-11-29

    India
    Shantipath, Chanakyapuri. New Delhi, 110021, India
    Phone: +91-11-2687-3799, +91-11-2688-9160, +91-11-2687-3802, +91-11-2611-0640/41/42
    Fax: +91-11-2687-6823
    e-mail: emb@rusembassy.in
    web: http://rusembassy.in/
    Social networks: http://twitter.com/RusEmbIndia https://www.facebook.com/RusEmbassyIndia https://www.facebook.com/rusemb.india

    United Kingdom
    6/7 Kensington Palace Gardens, London, W 8 4QP
    (+44-207) 229-64-12

    USA
    2650 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington D.C.
    (+1202) 298-5700

    See the full list of embassies, consulates and diplomatic missions at the Foreign Affairs Ministry site below

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    Moscow Mayor

    by Muscovite Updated Feb 4, 2015

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    Try to find anyone interested in museum opening hours or scenic landscapes in the Moscow forum. No way. Instead there will be a dozen questions to a page:
    Is Moscow safe?

    This is the fellow who operates the place today.
    Got safety concerns – pump him.

    (Apart from Russian, the site is in English, German, French, Spanish and Chinese.
    You can folow them in social networks, too)

    Sergei Sobyanin, the Moscow Mayor
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    Rubbing The Dog's Nose For Luck

    by johngayton Written Nov 28, 2014

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    The Metro station at Ploshchad Revolutsii (Revolution Square) literally personifies Stalin's ideal that the Moscow Metro, as well as being a utilitarian mass transit system, should reflect the triumphs of Socialism and that the stations should embody "svet" (radiance or brilliance) and "svetloe budushchee" (a radiant future).

    The core design of the station features a set of 18 archways leading to the platforms from the polished granite-floored main hall. The archways are constructed of red, black and gold marble and in each are a pair of life-sized bronze sculptures. The statues, of which there are 76 in total, represent the heroes of the revolution: the workers, peasants, soldiers and sailors, and the optimism of the future: sportsmen and women, mother and father-figures, students and academics.

    The most popular of these figures is that of a frontier guard with his dog, the nose of which has been rubbed to a gleaming shine by passing commuters. No-one is quite sure exactly how the tradition came about - perhaps it was started by Stalin himself who spent several hours admiring the works on its opening day of the 13th March 1938 - but it is considered to bring good luck to those who rub it. School and university students in particular will go out of their way during exam times to visit the station and touch the dog's nose; to the extent that sometimes they form a queue.

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    Who said Muscovites never smile?

    by Muscovite Updated Aug 29, 2014

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    This amicable gentleman greets me – and thousands of other Moscow metro passengers – every day at Yugo-Zapadnaya station with the ‘Metro’ free newspaper in hand.

    He is not that young, and the job is not that easy – I guess they start at 7 a.m., if not earlier, and it’s no fun in minus 20 C in winter, but he is always friendly, bright and positive.

    The paper should give him a bonus, I wouldn’t be reading them without his effort!
    P.S.
    Have sent the photos - they didn't go out perfectly, but still - to 'Metro' editors, hope to see him on the front page soon :)))

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    Never Shake Hands Over a Threshold

    by pdhharris Written Sep 18, 2012

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    In Russia, you should never shake hands with someone over a threshold (doorway, gap, etc). If you do, it is considered that something bad will happen between the two parties in the future.

    Also, when it comes to shaking hands, the best advice is to let the Russian offer their hand first. Often times, men will shake hands with men in Russia, but not with women. To avoid any awkwardness though, waiting to shake hands until they offer is often the best choice.

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    This is no human zoo

    by Muscovite Written Oct 21, 2011

    Tourist-turned-journalist:
    "Any advice where I should go to find hard-core authenticity? Drunk tractor drivers having a race, head-scarved babushkas with goats, men jumping into snow after the banya, that sort of thing?"

    - Head to Hollywood studios.

    Help yourself to 'real Russia'
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    Aeroflot and other bad Russians

    by Muscovite Updated Jun 10, 2011

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    An Aeroflot hostess takes home 900 euro on average - its major shareholder needs all the profit he can make out of the airline to payroll London celebrities and news-people, and they do not come that cheap.

    At 50 she will be sweeping the floors in a nearby shopping mall or carry somebody’s fur-coats in a cinema, unless she catches an Abramovich, and they mostly fly private jets.

    Same at 60, with a monthly pension of 130 euro and a free market economy she will have a very free choice of buying either medicine or food, but not both.

    Same at 70. And 80, if she makes it – women’s longer life expectancy is hardly a blessing here.

    But you folks in view of such bright prospects would still be all smiles and an icon of hospitality, right?

    Actress Doronina as air hostess 1968
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    Visa regulations:airport Sheremetievo

    by Muscovite Updated Jun 10, 2011

    If you fly into Sheremetievo airport and have visa concerns, here is their page on border control.

    You may want to write to them if you need more information, copy, save and bring with you the answer to wave in front of the border officer's nose - just in case.

    I'll try to find the site of the Russian Border Control Service in English, so far they only have it in Russsian.

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    Russian visa: Foreign Office

    by Muscovite Updated Jun 10, 2011

    Next to half a dozen questions in the Moscow Forum are:

    How does one get a Russian visa without actually taking the trouble to apply for one?
    I just fancy myself doing any such trick to enter Schengen.

    Unhappy with formalities?
    Go ask the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, they get paid for it.

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Smolenskaya Square
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    Why is everyone so gloomy in Moscow?

    by Muscovite Updated Jun 10, 2011

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    Look, try going to Detroit and look for smiling faces there - GM has just filed for bankruptcy.
    It’s no fun to live according to one’s means, is it?

    That’s market economy, folks.
    Remember what your advisers told us in 1991? Old-age pensions are the Soviet era holdover, aren’t they? And to think one’s life’s savings are really safe in the 100-years-old bank is an illusion typical of a paternalistic state, they said, we should be ashamed of it. You should take responsibility for your own life, they said, and so we did.

    Unemployment benefits, Medicare, food coupons, municipal flats for the poor – tell that to our teachers, doctors and scientists who raised potatoes and scrubbed the floors in those new offices.
    A loan for a house with a garden, a bedroom for each child – tell that to my neighbours from the Bolshoi theatre orchestra, they lived 4 adults and a child in a 2-bedrooms flat they had well bought and paid for.

    And those are not temporary passing hardships after years of indulging in wild consumption off numerous credit cards, that’s our life.

    Do you think I spend a few hours a day in the kitchen out of my devotion to Russian cuisine? Check the prices at the most modest of the Moscow diners and compare them the average salary anywhere except Oil & Gas – how many lunches can I buy without going boost, and I am not the worst linguist in the country, you know?

    I don’t normally rub salt into anybody’s wounds.
    But you, please, leave mine in peace, too.

    Dirt-resistant budget clothes in Moscow metro Moscow metro, 1956
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    A Modern Russian Parable

    by MrBill Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    One day a woman was visiting her husband that lived and worked very hard in Moscow. They were sitted at one of the best tables at Cafe Pushkin where they enjoyed a view of everything that was going on.

    They spotted an old friend across the restaurant, and she said,
    "Isn't that Jack Spalding?"
    "Yes, it is", answered her husband.
    "And, who is that pretty young girl he is with?", she queried.
    "Oh, that's his mistress", the husband said sheepishly.
    "My Lord", she cried, "that is terrible. How can he do such a thing at his age?"

    Just then their meal came and they tucked into some delicious goose liver pate' washed down with some lightly chilled dry white wine. As they were eating, along came another pretty, young lady and stopped to talk to the husband. He seemed to know her very well, and they chatted amicably for some minutes.

    After the young girl left, the wife asked,
    "And, who was that then?"
    "Oh, that is my mistress", he answered. "
    "What? I want a divorce", she cried.
    "Okay, but you realize all our wealth is tied-up in this joint venture in Russia, and that I am leveraged up to my eyeballs. You will have to go back to work. And, you will have to give up the Club and the expensive shops. Plus, the weekend home and the Mercedes, too" he intoned?

    She fell silent and thought about this for a while, until the next course came, which was a beautiful shashlik of wild game and vegetables, which went perfectly with the bottle of French red wine.

    Then she said, "Our mistress is prettier than Jack's isn't she?"

    Take me to the Kahzbar, dahrling

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    Russian visa

    by Muscovite Written Apr 4, 2011

    Another frustrated guest with a visa concern at the Moscow forum.
    Honestly, can’t see the problem.

    Have you got a Russian embassy in your country? Ask them, they get paid for it. If they don’t answer within a day, complain to the Russian ministry of Foreign affairs, I’ve got their contacts somewhere on my page.
    Or ask your own embassy in Russia, and if they don’t answer, get to your own Foreign office.
    If neither does anything, scream human rights breach and alert United Nations.
    I am pretty sure you’ll get a courier visa service at your door pretty soon.
    I tried this route myself as I find it roaring shame to stand in line for hours to get a visa, it’s not what we had our perestroika for. It works.

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  • Moscow Students’ superstitious

    by LeraVB Written Dec 28, 2010

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    Probably all students around the world have their own superstitious about attracting the Luck on exam.
    It doesn’t matter how many hours you spent on lecturers and books before exam, you must be sure good luck will follow you… and you do certain ritual for that.
    For Russian students are important:
    • Not wash or cut hair on the day of exam. In case, all “right” and “clever” thoughts wouldn’t leave the head .
    • Always wear the same “fortune” clothes for all exams.

    If you will go around Russian students’ dormitories at midnight before exam, you would hear plaintive cries from opened windows. With credit book and magic words “Freebie, be caught” students try to attract Freebie and Fortune. The louder student cry, the more possibly the freebie will come. And I know many a one who have succeeded 

    Another ritual with 5 kopeks coin (soviet time) or five rubles coin: when you going to pass exam, it is necessary to put it into shoes under left heel and success almost guaranteed…! 

    It’s interesting, especially for Moscow’ students a monument in the form of huge "five-kopeck coin" was built in Mar’ino district of Moscow (Park park of the 850 anniversary of Moscow). During session time it gathers a lot of students from all universities of Moscow.

    If you would like this hot time has passed successfully, it is necessary to stand into bronze boots and blindly to throw five kopecks in the center of the big five-kopeck coin.

    And to hand over all session, it is necessary to get from the center of a monument a five-kopeck coin on the name of the university, where you study and which abbreviations are put on the earth, or to put your credit book to "five" on bronze credit book.

    Another monument there is in Moscow Metro. At the“Revolution square” station you can easily find among others monument of frontiersman with dog. By students belief the touch of dog’s nose brings good luck on exam, and many Moscow student hurry up in early morning on the day of exam to do this ritual.

    If you are planning to study in Moscow I hope this knowledge would be helpful for you. Good luck!!!

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    Driving in Moscow

    by kris-t Updated Dec 19, 2010

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    You should drive very aggresive here (all do this way)/
    For example my husband (who has been driver of trucks and has 21 years expiriensce in Canada) says that Moscow way to drive is too crazy for him :) . Than it's my duty - to drive in Moscow.

    Ruls here are mostly the same (right turn with red light ia not allowed) - people are different. Be ready for suprises...
    are you ready for that? American Driver license works here temporary (14 days).

    http://www.gibdd.ru/expat/474.gpml

    rent car:

    http://gertz.ru/contacts.htm

    car 2002-2005 cost from 45 USD a day and they ask deposit 300-600 usd

    Driving in Moscow Driving in Moscow Driving in Moscow Driving in Moscow
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    Kilometre Zero - Make a wish

    by HORSCHECK Updated Mar 19, 2010

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    In front of of the Resurrection gate, which is the northern entrance to Red Square, the Kilometre Zero marker is set into the ground.

    All distances within Moscow and Russia are measured from this point. Tourists usually have their photo taken here, while throwing some coins over the shoulder and making a wish.

    The interesting thing about this is, that there are always some poor or homeless local people around who immediately pick up the money.

    Kilometre Zero marker
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