Unique Places in Moscow

  • The old English court yard, Moscow
    The old English court yard, Moscow
    by kris-t
  • The Church of the Ascension 2013
    The Church of the Ascension 2013
    by kris-t
  • The old English court yard
    The old English court yard
    by kris-t

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Moscow

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    Moscow Anthem

    by Muscovite Written Jan 9, 2014

    The story of the city anthem is too long and complicated to be put in a couple of words. You may want look up the helpful Wikipedia for ‘The Battle of Moscow 1941’ to figure out why the author (one of them, to be precise) lived in trenches and got buried alive - twice at that.

    For words and music go to:
    http://www.mos.ru/en/about/symbols/hymn/index.php
    This is the official site, they write English the best they can.

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    Bolshoy Kamenny Bridge

    by kris-t Updated Dec 5, 2013

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    Great Stone Bridge (Russian: Bolshoy Kamenny most), crossing the Moskva River at the western end of the Kremlin, was the first permanent stone bridge in Moscow.

    A "live" bridge of boats linked the Kremlin with Balchug on the same site as early as the 15th century. In 1643, Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich engaged an architect from Strassburg to design a stone bridge. Construction works dragged on for four decades and were not completed until 1682 (or 1692, depending on sources). The finally constructed eight-span bridge, measuring 22 meters wide by 170 meters long, was first named Vsekhsvyatsky ("all saints" in Russian) after the nearby All Saints Gate of the White Town of Moscow. On the river bank opposite to the Gate, there was a toll tower surmounted by two pyramidal tents.

    In 1858, the ancient stone bridge was demolished and replaced by the first iron bridge in Moscow, which had only three spans instead of eight. The current 487-meter-long bridge was opened in 1938. The bridge, one of the most congested in Moscow, overlooks the Kremlin and the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour.

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    Catlic church

    by kris-t Updated Aug 12, 2012

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    The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception of the Holy Virgin Mary is one of only two Catholic churchesthe largest in Russia.
    It's a neo-Gothic church that serves as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Moscow. Located in the Central Administrative Okrug.

    27/13 Malaya Gruzinskaya st., Moscow

    Construction work began in 1901 and was completed ten years later. The style was influenced by Westminster Abbey and Milan Cathedral.

    The cathedral was closed in 1938 and reopened in 1996. Now The cathedral is once again the setting for regular church services in multiple languages—Russian, Polish, Korean, English, French, Spanish, Armenian and Latin—as well as benefit concerts featuring organ and church music.

    Organ and church music concerts take place regularly in the cathedral. Entry is free, except for selected concerts.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Moscow Kievskaia railway station

    by kris-t Updated Aug 12, 2012

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    Was opened 29.06.1899
    Train movement directions: all trains to the territory of Ukraine and transit in Europe. metro "Kievskaya"

    Main directions:

    Ukraine:
    Evpatoria
    Kaluga
    Kiev
    Kishineu (Mold.)
    Lvov
    Odessa
    Simferopol
    Ujgorod
    Europe:
    Budapest-Keleti
    Sofia

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Moscow Paveleckaya railway station

    by kris-t Updated Aug 12, 2012

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    Was opened 19.01.1900
    Train movement directions: Central part of Russia, West-South part of Ukraine, Baltic countries.
    metro "Paveletskaya"

    Main directions:

    Russia:
    Astrahan
    Baku
    Doneck
    Rostov
    Saratov
    Volgograd
    Voronej

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    History of Moscow

    by kris-t Updated Sep 29, 2011

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    The first chronicle record of Moscow dates from 1147. The foundation of the city of Moscow is related to the name of Yuri Vladimirovich Dolgoruky, a Suzdal prince famous for creating towns (in 1954 a monument to Yuri Dolgoruki was built in the center of the capital).

    At first Moscow was one of the smaller towns near the south-west frontier of Vladimir and Suzdal Land. Little by little significance of the town grew. Even numerous wars and devastation could not stop that process.

    There are several legends about the foundation of Moscow and origin of the very word «Moscow». One of them tells of the conflict between prince Yuri and boyar Kuchka. The boyar did not show due respect to the prince. For such an attitude the great prince ordered «that the boyar be captured and put to death». On the spot from which the village was taken from Kuchka the prince decided to found «the city of Moscow». In the opinion of historians, real events form the core of this legend.

    There is also a legend tracing Moscow's «genealogy» back to … Ilya Muromets. According to that legend, the capital of this great power was founded on the place where the legendary hero had died. The first chronicled record of Moscow is related to the fact that Yuri Dolgoruky met his ally, Novgorod-Seversky prince Svyatoslav there («come to me, Brother, to Moscow») and arranged a feast. Judging by the fact that Moscow managed to feed two numerous druzhinas (princes armed militia), it was already a significant settlement at that time.

    Judging by the large number of mounds on the outskirts of Moscow, it was already the center of an agricultural area which adjoined the town.

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    Some VT member was born here...

    by kris-t Updated Jan 10, 2011

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    It's not just the house, where I was born, it's an example of Postconstructivism architectural style (early Stalinist architecture before World War II) , wich was build 1934—1936, architect Golosov.
    In sixties it were classic Soviet communal apartments (nowdays it's elite apartments) - several families lived in the same apartment with common bathroom and kitchen. My family of 4 had 1 room there.

    Podkolokolnui pereulok - street in the Moscow downtown between Solyanka Street and Pokrovsky boulevard, steps from famous Khitrovka (a square in the centre of Moscow from 1820 to 1930, a bawdy place of Moscow, a den for thousands of unemployed and criminals).

    Another example of Postconstructivism architectural style is the well-known House on the quay ("House of government ") (see Things To Do for more).

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    Varvarka Street

    by kris-t Updated Nov 27, 2010

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    Varvarka Street is the oldest (and MUST see) street of Moscow that dates back to the 12th century.
    Varvarka is one of the three main streets of Kitai-Gorod. At first it made a start from Spasskiye gate of the Kremlin and lay along the crest of the hill above the Moskva-river.
    Since the middle of the 16th century the street has been actively built up. After the fire of 1812 most of the houses and shops in the street were rebuit in stone.

    Varvarka Street has preserved many churches and the old atmosphere of Kitai-Gorod:
    the Church of the Protecting Veil of Our Lady on Pskov Mount (1698);
    Church of the Trinity in Nikitniki (c.1630);
    the Monastery of the Holy Sign (1684);
    Church of St. Maxim the Blessed (1698);
    Church of St. Barbara the Martyr (1658).

    On another side you will see some samples of classic 18-19th century architecture.

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    Zero kilometre of Russian highways

    by kris-t Updated Nov 27, 2010

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    This bronze plaque is marking kilometre zero of the Russian highway system.
    Situated infront of Iverskie gate (near Red Square) . This is a symbolic place from where car rallies start and distances are measured between the Russian capital and other cities and countries.
    Back in 1839 Emperor Nicholas I ruled that Verst Zero should be the Admiralty in St. Petersburg, the Kremlin Palace in Moscow, and Post Office buildings in all other cities.

    This place is always crowded, and it is a custom to drop coins here to be back one day.

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    English House, Varvarka

    by kris-t Updated Nov 27, 2010

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    English House - The old English court yard of the 16-17 century - is next to the church of St. Barbara. It is one of the first civilian stone buildings harking back to the turn of the 16th century.
    There English merchants - represents of the English trading firm Moscow Company based in London - lived in the 16th century.

    They in exchange for military supplies to Ivan the Terrible were allowed to sell their goods duty-free in Russia. One floor was used as living for both merchants and ambassadors and the others as stores.

    In the 17th century this building housed the Arithmetic School established by the order of Peter I.
    It was revived in the 1950s. Today it has been completely restored and serves as the branch of the Museum of History of Moscow. The exposition shows the development of diplomatic and trading relationships between Russia and England.

    Opening hours:
    10 a. m. - 6 p.m. (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday),
    11a.m. - 9 p.m. (Wednesday, Friday).
    Days-off: Mondays and the last Friday of the month.
    Entrance fee: RUB 50 ($1.70) (for individual visitors), RUB 200 ($6.80) (excursions).

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    Russian Orthodox church - in English

    by Muscovite Updated Oct 27, 2010

    This is the site of the Russian Orthodox church - in English

    http://www.mospat.ru/en/

    and this is the address

    Communication service
    of the Department for External Church Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate
    Address: 22, Danilovsky val, Danilov monastery DECR MP, 115191 Moscow, Russia
    E-Mail: cs@mospatr.ru | Tel/Fax: +7 (495) 633-8428

    You may want to contact them about attending church services

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    The famous and infamous....

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 20, 2009

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    You can't miss seeing the monstrous (and highly controversial) sculpture of Peter the Great whilst you're in Moscow, and you might think seeing it from afar is as much as you want to do but coming closer will bring you in range of the city's Sculpture Park and that is something you really shouldn't miss. Not only will you find yourself face to face with all the major figures and symbols of the old Soviet regime - Lenin, Stalin, Dzerzhinsky, Brezhnev - having been deposed from their pedestals around the city, they're almost all here - other sections of the park include areas devoted to Soviet Realist works dedicated to the heroes of the Great Patriotic War ( aka WWII), literary heroes such as Maxim Gorky (photo 4) and modern works including a haunting representation of the victims of Stalin (photo 5).

    Altogether there are more than 700 works displayed and you could spend hours here wandering along the wooden walkways between the birch trees, but even a short visit is better than none.

    The park lies between the river and the Tretyakov's Museum of Modern Art on Krymsky Val

    Metro: Park Kultury (on the brown ring / red line)

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    Getting padlocked

    by nyperose Updated Aug 8, 2009

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    On a walk across Moscow I came across this bridge with trees full of closed padlocks.

    I was wandering around watching and wondering what it was all about. I imagined prison camps and other horrors.......until I stopped two young women and asked them why the padlocks were hanging there.

    They told me that Russian couples hang them there when they are getting married. It's a symbol that they are locked together. What a lucidity....walking into a marriage open-eyed:-D
    I wonder why nobody ever thought about that in the West!

    The marriage rates might have dwindled seriously:-D

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    Very interesting artwork

    by dlandt Updated Mar 17, 2009

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    Just over the Kamenny bridge adjacent to the Kremlin and between the river and the canal, there lies a small park. If you were to walk through the park, you would find this display. Entitled "The Children Pay for the Sins of their Parents" it proved facinating to me at least. You can see by the pictures that some are the Gods of old, while some seem to be more nightmarish creatures out of art or literature. Check out the garden bar and restaurant while you are there.

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    Georgian food, warm breezes, and Bochkarov beer

    by dlandt Updated Mar 17, 2009

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    Just over the Kamenny bridge adjacent to the Kremlin and between the river and the canal, there lies a small park. In this park, you can find a cozy outdoor beer garden that also serves Georgian food. They grill excelllent shashlik and wonderful side dishes with a choice of condiments, tikimali(?) was the best. The beer is ice cold, the desserts not too sweet, the coffee strong and the owners friendly. One guy in particular was surprisingly fluent in English, something of a rarity in Moscow. This small place turned out to be one of the best I found in Moscow. You could make conversation with locals, enjoy the evenings, sip beer, eat well, and just generally enjoy yourself. At the end of a tiring day, it was ideal.

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Moscow Off The Beaten Path

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