Monuments & Landmarks, Moscow

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  • Lenin Statue at Oktyabrskaya ploshchad
    Lenin Statue at Oktyabrskaya ploshchad
    by HORSCHECK
  • Lenin Statue at Oktyabrskaya ploshchad
    Lenin Statue at Oktyabrskaya ploshchad
    by HORSCHECK
  • Visoko-Petrovsky monastery
    Visoko-Petrovsky monastery
    by kris-t
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    Visoko-Petrovsky monastery

    by kris-t Updated Nov 19, 2011

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    Visoko-Petrovsky monastery
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    Vysoko-Petrovsky Monastery was founded in 1380 in the village of Vysokoye by Prince Dmitry Donskoi after his return from the Battle of Kulikovo.

    This site was once occupied by the ancient Bogolubskaya Church of Ivan Kalita. It is said that when the Muscovite Prince Ivan Kalita passed this place, he suddenly saw a high mountain covered with snow which all of a sudden melted away, and then the mountain also disappeared. He described this vision to Metropolitan Pyotr a few days before his death.
    The Metropolitan explained that the high mountain was the Prince, and the snow was the humble Metropolitan who should take leave of this world before Kalita.

    To make a memorial to this miraculous vision Kalita built the Church of the Bogolyubskaya Icon to the Mother of God, which later became the main church of Visoko-Petrovsky Monastery.

    The monastery came under the patronage of a boyar family, the Naryshkins, and in particular Natalia Naryshkina Peter's the Great mother.

    In 1812 the convent was ransacked by the French, and in Bogolubskaya Church Marshal Mortie sentenced some local people to death for setting fires.

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  • Stalins’ Hymn in Moscow metro

    by LeraVB Written Dec 28, 2010

    Do you know where in Moscow metro you can find integliated words from Soviet (so called Stalin’s) Hymn :

    “Through Days dark and stormy where Great Lenin Lead us
    Our Eyes saw the Bright Sun of Freedom above
    and Stalin our Leader with Faith in the People,
    Inspired us to Build up the Land that we Love.” ?

    The Answer is simple – Kurskaya (Ring line), Sun of the Victory Hall .

    After XXII meeting of Communist party of Soviet Union in 1961, where Stalin’s personal cult was blamed, the last 2 lines of Hymn were removed from the wall, where they were since station openings on 1 January 1950/

    During recent restoration in 2008-2009 the lines were reconstructed and Ground pavilion has received its genuine historical view … except Stalins’ monument, which took away irreversibly.

    Renewed Ground pavilion of the Kurskaya station looks very lovely and definitely must to be seen during you visit to Moscow.

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    Mopping up Moscow

    by Muscovite Updated Oct 27, 2010

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    Street-cleaning Mayor

    Our industrious Mayor Luzhkov swept the city’s streets for an extra rouble when he was a student – or so he says.

    The statue will welcome you to The Museum of Modern Art at 25 Petrovka, and you don’t even have to pay the entrance fee.

    Image courtesy
    http://vasi.net/community/kartinki/2009/06/03/neobychnye_pamjatniki_moskvy.html

    P.S.
    No he is former mayor, and chances are the statue is no longer there.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    The last Lenin Statue

    by HORSCHECK Updated Mar 16, 2010

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    Lenin Statue at Oktyabrskaya ploshchad
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    The last Lenin Statue which was erected in Moscow in 1985 can be found on Oktyabrskaya ploshchad (October Square).

    The statue was built by the sculptor Lev Kerbel and symbolizes the multinational nature of the 1917 October Revolution.

    Directions:
    The square Oktyabrskaya ploshchad, where the last Lenin Statue stands, is dominated by urban grey apartment blocks from Soviet times. Moscow's longest street, Leninskiy prospect, begins at Oktyabrskaya ploshchad. The nearest Metro stop is Oktyabrskaya.

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    Moscow past and present, part 1

    by Muscovite Updated May 29, 2009

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    Hotel Moscow: past perfect - past simple - present

    Just came across a gallery of landmark photos – 19th – 20th century compared with how it looks today (if there is anything left to look at, which is not always the case)

    Hotel Moscow in Brezhnev's time, 1976 - in the middle,
    How the place looked in 1899 - above,
    The same hotel suffering the market economy reconstruction - 2008

    Courtesy http://www.rian.ru/moscow_mm/20081010/152857191_5.html

    In Russian only – so far

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    The second tallest building in Europe

    by Pablos_new Updated May 27, 2009

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    Up to last decade Moscow State University was the tallest building in Moscow - 240 m. But...

    A couple of years ago construction of one more vysotka was completed near metro Sokol. This is block of elite flats called "Triumph-Palace". The 57-story building, containing about 1,000 luxury apartments, was topped out on December 20, 2003, making it Europe's tallest building at 264.1 metres (866 ft) until the inauguration in 2007 of Moscow's 268 metre Naberezhnaya Tower block C. Both with MSU are in top 15 tallest buildings of the world.

    Sorry, I have not jet taken a photo of it. This is a photo and the scale model from internet.

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    Normandie - Niemen, part 2

    by Muscovite Updated May 8, 2009

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    Ivan Tsvetkov���s house Courtesy www.mosday.ru

    This building will last, I hope.
    It was turned to the French in 1942 and still houses their defence attache's office. A lovely little piece the 'fairy-tale' style of the turn of the century, architect Lev Kekushev, designer Viktor Vasnetsov. You can google both names, they popular far and wide. Maybe you will not see the white memorial plate at the entrance with the 42 names, but it is there. There is a florist's shop on the cathedral square.

    The directions are simple: head to the Christ the Saviour Cathedral, stand at the river and turn back.

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    A historic shopping experience

    by mikey_e Written Jul 15, 2008

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    Gostiniy Dvor

    Gostiniy Dvor is a sort of old-time bazaar, although it should not be thought of as a flea market. Foreign merchants would come to Moscow and set up their own national markets, hawking wares from their home countries to Russian buyers. As one of the functions of government, the Tsarist régime set up Gostiniy Dvor as a large indoor marketplace at which all these foreign merchants, as well as Russian ones, could sell their goods. Today, Gostiniy Dvor still has some shops, as well as restaurants, but it has quite obviously lost its importance as a central commercial hub. We didn't go inside, as it appears that most shops are pretty expensive, but it is a building of historical interest that you will likely notice if you come along Varvarska from Kitay Gorod towards Red Square.

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    Monument to Griboyedov

    by mikey_e Written Jul 14, 2008

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    Monument to Griboyedov

    Aleksandr Sergeevich Griboyedov was an early 19th century poet, dramatist and diplomat who was born in Moscow but died in Tehran, presumably on mission for the Russian Crown. A monument commemorating his works and his service to his country can be found just opposite the Chistye Prudy metro station. In truth, it is not a spectacular piece of masonry or art, but it is a mighty handy landmark and something to inspect if you arrange meet someone at Chistye Prudy subway stop and they arrive late.

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    Bogoyavlensky and Likhud Monument

    by mikey_e Written Jul 14, 2008

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    Monument to the Lukhad brothers
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    The Likhud Brothers (Ioannikos and Sofronios ?) were two Greek monks who took up residence in Moscow in the late 17th century and greatly added to the collection of theological and philosophical works that make up the Orthodox canon. In 2007, a monument to them was erected in Bogoyavlensky alley (south-east of Ploshchad Revolutsii), which descriptions of their accomplishments in both Russian and Greek. Interestingly enough, the monument is located in this out of the way spot because it stands in front of the Bogoyavlensky Monastery, a now-abandoned 13th century monastery that once housed the Vicary of the Metropolitan of Moscow. It was returned to the Church in 1991 for religious services, and it seemed that I believe that it may be open to the public. Even if you don't get a chance to go inside, the now restored Monastery has some exquisite icons on its exterior, visible from the other side of the alley.

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    Monument to Abai Qunanbayuli

    by mikey_e Written Jul 14, 2008

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    Monument to Abai Qunanbayuli

    Abai Qunanbayuli, or Kunanbaev (according to the Russian transliteration), was a Kazakh composer, poet and reformist who sought to fuse European and Asian ideals and create a more liberal version of Islam. His progressive ideology made him the ideal rolemodel for the Soviet régime, and he has continued to be popular with the current Kazakh régime.

    The monument to Qunanbayuli is in Chistye Prudy, and is the first clue to the visitor that this is perhaps Moscow's only ethnic enclave, the centre of the Kazakh community in the city. The Kazakh embassy is to the east of the park, and there are a number of Kazakh restaurants in this area. There is also an embassy that is attached to the embassy and that is a sort of cheap accomodation for lower-level Kazakh diplomats and other visitors. The actual monument to Qunanbayuli is an interesting little enclave within Chistye Prudy, with a few of his verses in Russian and Kazakh.

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    Novospasski Monastir

    by filip007 Written Oct 2, 2007

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    Novospasski monastery from the park below

    One of the fortified medieval monasteries that were built around Moscow to provide additional protection for the town.

    Very quite and not so much visited monastery and cathedral, except for people going to the office. The central Transfiguration cathedral was built by the Romanov family and includes frescoes depicting the history of their family.

    For more pictures you can see the travelogue Novospasski.

    To get there, the metro station is Proletarskaya or Taganskaya, the address is Verkhny Novospasski proezd.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Moscow triumphal arch (Kutuzovski prospect)

    by kris-t Updated Jun 7, 2007

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    The Moscow triumphal arch, erected in wood in 1814 and in marble in 1827 to a design by Osip Bove, was relocated and reconstructed on Poklonnaya Gora in 1968.

    A loghouse, where Kutuzov presided over the Fili conference which decided to surrender Moscow to the enemy, was designated a national monument. The huge panorama "Battle of Borodino" by Franz Roubaud (1910-12) was installed on Kutuzovski prospect (Kutuzov Avenue) in 1962. A monument to Kutuzov was opened in 1973.

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    The Kremlin Wall Cemetery off of Red Square

    by WorldPassenger Updated Jan 14, 2007
    Ground burial sculptures and wall crypt plaques

    The Bolsheviks turned Red Square into a cemetery in 1917 even though the church objected. Then, over the decades, more and more “heroes” were entombed here. It is not easy to casually spot this cemetery. It is laid out at the base of the Kremlin Wall with many crypts in the wall itself. This cemetery is positioned between Spasskaya Tower and down beyond Lenin’s mausoleum and is very close to the Kremlin Wall itself. Actually, I wonder if the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, aligned against a different Kremlin Wall, could be considered a part of this cemetery?

    The cemetery is not garish in any way and many of the ground-buried dead have flat headstones that look like simple benches. Others have headstones with sculptures. After a visit to Lenin’s Tomb, the exit path leads through this cemetery. All of the inscriptions are, of course, in Russian. But some sculptures make it easy to determine who was buried there if one knows something of history or is old enough to remember faces from long ago TV news programs.

    Both men and women, famous and infamous figures of Russian history, have gravesites here at base of the Kremlin Wall. Historical figures such as Josef Stalin (2nd leader of the USSR), Leonid Brezhnev (General Secretary of the Communist Party), Yuri Andropov (Soviet Union Premier), Alexi Kosygin (Soviet political leader), Maxim Gorky (author and political activist), Yuri Gagarin (first man in space), Inessa Armand (Lenin's lover), Elena Glinskaya (mother of Ivan the Terrible) and many others are buried here.

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    Monument to Citizen Minin and Prince Pozharsky

    by WorldPassenger Written Jan 12, 2007
    Monument to Minin and Pozharsky - Red Square
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    The monument to Citizen Minin and Prince Pozharsky that stands in front of St Basils cathedral is often seen but usually overlooked by the tourists visiting the marvelous cathedral. That is because everyone is focused on the cathedral and not on this national monument. And since the signage is in Russian, the tourists do not understand the importance of this stature.

    This bronze statue, located in a small garden where tourists exit from the cathedral tour, dates from 1818 and commemorates the men Dmitry Pozharsky and Kuzma Minin, who rallied Russia's volunteer army against Polish invaders in the 17th century. Dmitry was a prince and Minin was a butcher. Together they lead the effort to drive the Polish invaders out of Moscow in 1612, 200 years before the French under Napoleon came to grief in this same place.

    The inscription reads: To Citizen Minin and Prince Pozharsky. From Grateful Russia.

    This statue was originally constructed in the center of Red Square, but the Soviet government felt it obstructed its parades and moved the statue in front of the cathedral in 1936.

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