What to buy?, Moscow

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  • What to buy?
    by Muscovite
  • What to buy?
    by Muscovite
  • Russian matryoshkas - Nestling dolls
    Russian matryoshkas - Nestling dolls
    by HORSCHECK
  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Vernisazh market: Lovely linen

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 5, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Top quality

    What to buy: Russian linen is really something special, absolutely top quality that you would pay far more in the West. Tablecloths, runners, napkins, teatowels -all sorts of beautiful napery is available in large range of sizes, colours (or subtle, natural tones) and designs.
    Textiles are wonderful souvenirs -unbreakable, easy to pack and useful rather than something else to dust when you get home! If you don't buy one for yourself, your mother would love it and it will last so well you can inherit it - and pass it on to the next generation.

    What to pay: $20 for a medium-sized (2mx1.5m) tablecloth, $2 for a teatowel (I am still reeling from seeing an identical teatowel to one I bought on sale at $45!!! in a chi-chi homeware shop here at home last week)

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Various shops in churches and the city: Icons

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 5, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Pantocrator

    What to buy: Icons are integral to Russian religious belief and by the time you have left Moscow you may well have had your fill of their grave beauty. If, however, you want to take one home , you have two choices really - a cheaply produced photographic reproduction that will cost you just a few dollars, or one that has been painted according to the strictly observed protocols of icon painting that have been in existence for centuries. You will find selections of these at most of the shops within churches and museums. Their cost will depend on the refinement of the work, but they do not come particularly cheap. Buying an icon this way though, you can be sure that you are paying a fair market price, whatever the size or the execution of the work.

    One thing you will not be able to do is buy an antique icon. There are very strict prohibitions on the export of anything that has any age to it and any one who tries to sell you such a work is not only breaking the law but also laying you open to a criminal charge. If antique icons are what you are after, you should go to somewhere like Estonia or one of the other ex-Soviet bloc countries where you will find they are readily and legally available - though whether or not they are genuine is another matter. The world of antique icons is awash with fakes.

    What to pay: $5 or so for a cheap reproduction
    $100+ for something authentic.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Yesileev Grocery Store: Ludmilla's chocolate

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Jul 26, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chocaholic's delight

    What to buy: Ludmilla insisted I had to have some Russian chocolate - it was, she said, "the very best". I like dark chocolate and this was very good. It's smooth and fine, not sweet and with that "crack" as you snap it that tells you this is the real thing. My favourite is the one with roasted almonds. Choosing it was a matter of great seriousness and discussion with the assistant..

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    All over town: Everyone loves them

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Jul 21, 2005

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    Every shape and size

    What to buy: You see them everywhere, in every shape and size and colour, mostly depicting rather simperingly pretty girls but there are politicians, footballers, Santas, comic book characters and more -the invention of the people who paint them knows no bounds. They are matrioshkas -the nesting dolls that are so Russian they are almost a cliche. You wouldn't think there could be enough tourists to buy them all. Cute as they are, most look pretty mass-produced; however, it is possible to find individual ones if you want something a little different. It will cost you more but it will have a character and style that the others do not.

    What to pay: The price range is huge -a few dollars for a small doll with maybe 5 or 6 others inside, more for a bigger one (some have as many as 12 or 15 "babies". I paid $20 for a really nice small one (6) painted in subtle colours with girls in peasant dress and baskets of different fruits.

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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    art galleries and anitque markets: How to Harmonize With Customs

    by MrBill Updated Feb 17, 2005

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    Russian customs - avoid surprises

    Foreign buyers in Moscow's art and antiques salons need to think ahead or risk unpleasant surprises at the airport. The cash value of your purchase is unlikely to be a problem, since recently introduced rules allow the duty-free export of valuables worth up to $10,000 per traveler, provided that you have a receipt to prove the value.

    The headaches start in the less quantifiable realm of culture. Items that are more than 50 years old will be confiscated by customs unless the owner has a certificate from the Culture Ministry permitting their export. Cultural artifacts over 100 years old are practically forbidden for a private traveler to take out of the country.But any paintings, books or other artifacts -- even those made yesterday -- could land you in trouble if a customs officer suspects that he is looking at "particularly valuable objects of the cultural heritage of the peoples of the Russian Federation," as stated in the 1993 law that governs cultural exports.

    It is also important to realize that non-Russian art objects will have problems leaving Russia, if customs suspects that you obtained them here. The rule can lead to trauma if you bring in some personal item of value and get challenged at customs on the way out. The golden rule is to put any such item into a declaration when you arrive, get it stamped at incoming customs, and show the declaration when you leave.

    What to buy: Russian dolls, ceramics and other souvenirs available at Arbat Kollektsiya and similar stores and stalls are familiar sights to customs officers, and should cause no problems. But paintings, even those bought in souvenir shops and from street artists, are a trickier proposition.

    The customs officer might take it on faith that you bought the work from an Arbat artist and it was painted yesterday, but he might say that he knows nothing about art and that you could have written on yesterday's date yourself, and that it must go for additional expert assessment.

    To avoid such pleasant circumstances, a traveler needs prior documents from the Culture Ministry. That will take one day or several days, depending on whether or not officials at the ministry decide that your item has "cultural value." Record of purchase, or a legally witnessed deed of gift, is one of the Culture Ministry's requirements for export permission. Other requirements are two photographs of the object, as well as copies of your passport and visa.

    In some cases, the ministry may call in the object itself for a visual assessment by experts, who will approve or decline a special export certificate.

    What to pay: Objects more than 50 years old need such a certificate regardless of their cultural value.If your object is less than 50 years old and Culture Ministry officials decide that it is merely "an object with cultural application," then a simple one-page form can be stamped at once, attesting that the object does not come under the 1993 law, and can be freely exported.The stamped form is the usual documentation for contemporary art items, including paintings, bought directly from artists at street markets or in galleries.
    Galleries dealing in contemporary art will sometimes do the job of getting ministry approval on behalf of the customer. "We will do it ourselves at no extra charge for someone who buys pictures in our gallery." Some legal firms and international removal agencies, oriented to expatriates working in Russia, also offer services helping with obtaining the relevant export documentation from the Culture Ministry.

    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Arts and Culture
    • Business Travel

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  • luiggi's Profile Photo

    Matryoshka

    by luiggi Updated Nov 20, 2004
    Matryoshka

    Matryoshka means "a little Matryona," the Russian name that means "mother." It is probably one of the oldest toys. It represents generations of women in the family and dates back to the times when families were matrilineal.
    There are many kinds of Matryoshka coming from different areas in Russia.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Street markets: Christmas ornaments

    by Dabs Updated Sep 8, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What to buy: I thought these were a really cool gift or souvenir to bring back, ornaments shaped like czars and czarinas, fishermen, Russian dancers and even a Russian bear. I don't remember exactly how much they were but they were relatively inexpensive and you can bargain if you are buying several.

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    Street markets: Nested dolls

    by Dabs Updated Sep 8, 2004

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    Nested doll

    What to buy: Nested dolls, also known as matryoshka dolls, are a popular item at most souvenir markets. The one in the picture is a rather simple one with just a few dolls and a simple design, the more dolls that are nested and the more ornate the design, the higher the price.

    This is a more traditional design, there are also spoofs of current and former politicians, athletes and cartoon characters such as Winnie the Pooh.

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    Street markets: Soviet memorabilia

    by Dabs Updated Sep 8, 2004

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    Soviet pins

    At the markets you can find old Soviet stuff such as the pins shown in the attached photos, cigarette cases, tea holders, Lenin busts, hats, etc. There is an abundance of all of these items floating around but there are pins everywhere, we got most of these from a man at the flea market who had imbibed a touch too much vodka, he kept throwing more and more pins into our bag and charged us practically nothing.

    My favorite pins are the ones from the Moscow olympics, the ones that the US boycotted, with the mascot, Misha the bear.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    What to buy?: Red October - sweets-producing

    by kris-t Updated Feb 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    «Red October» has 5 production departments. On the main territory there are: a hardboiled sweets department, a sweet department, a chocolate department and retail department, and in near Moscow Yegorievsk there is a department producing jam and candied carrot, citrus and other fruits, berries and vegetables widely used in the production of hardboiled sweets and candies.

    What to buy: Red October" uses for production only natural products doing without synthetic preservatives and substitutes. Total range of raw materials used amounts to about 100 types.
    So, the bulk of cacao-beans used for production is mainly of African origin - Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana, and high-grade beans necessary for making flavor of the best dessert grades of chocolate are purchased in Ecuador, Java, Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada.

    you should buy some sweets-producing !! it's really good, especially CHOCOLATE

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Matryoshka

    by Sharrie Written Dec 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ok, it's a known fact I love dolls... porcelain ones with national costumes on them.

    This is a different kind of dolls. Very Russian.
    I actually bought one in Vegas long time ago.
    Hidden somewhere in my closets (& i've many ;-)).

    But, they are nice ones. Provided you actually have the patience to take all of them out & play with it.
    Don't think I'll ever get the time! Usually there are 10 of them or 15 for some.

    Frankly, be realistic... how often would you take dolls out from another & then to keep them again?
    I pleaded temporary insanity!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Watches: KGB

    by Sharrie Written Dec 19, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I heard from some of those in my tour group that you should get this. Mostly guys.

    Watches... KGB watches precisely.
    Truly?
    I have no idea.
    But they sure look like something fun to have :-)
    Go for it, guys!

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Eggs?! No, not Easter...: Faberge

    by Sharrie Written Dec 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To each his/her own

    What to buy: This is just not my kind of collections. But some of the people I know love them.

    So here it is.
    Faberge I think is Russian company. Right?
    The designs are exquisite.
    The price, don't ask unless you've a large stack of bills!

    Think digital ;-)

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Lacquer ware: Shop to your heart's content... ie, u must be rich

    by Sharrie Written Dec 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What to buy: Shopping in Russia is terribly expensive!
    You'd think you are in Scandinavia or U.S.!
    It's either Euro or US$!

    I think these are nice items. But the price, forget it! That's not how I choose to spend money! & they are in foreign hard currency!

    Something like this easily cost more than US$500!

    I know, I know, I've expensive taste :-S

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  • musbars's Profile Photo

    What to buy?: Palekh, Gzjel, Matreshka

    by musbars Written Nov 14, 2003

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    Matreshka
    4 more images

    Vernisage - open air market .
    Arbat - lots of shops.

    What to buy: Palekh - paper-machier boxes. Handpainted. The more expensive are decorated with gold paint and have very fine details and different shapes. Real art work.
    Gzjel - Russian ceramic. White base with blue floral pattern. Nice. Fragile.
    Matreshka ( Nesting doll ). More expensive include more pieces.

    What to pay: Vernisage - you can to bargan.

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