Arbat Street, Moscow

40 Reviews

metro: Arbatskaya, Smolenskaya

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  • Arbat Street
    by elpariente
  • Arbat Street
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Arbat Street
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Muscovite's Profile Photo

    Melnikov House – the jewel of Russian avantgarde

    by Muscovite Updated Mar 5, 2014
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    Good news:
    The widely known – in narrow circles – Melnikov House will soon become a museum.
    Err… ‘Soon’ is a very vague notion in Russian, it may be tomorrow, it may be next century. Hopefully the authorities will hurry, as this symbol of the 1920s experimental art is currently not in a very good shape.
    Indeed, it’s a miracle it had survived, right in the heart of Moscow, with all the reconstruction of 1930s – 50s and the developers’ golden rush of 1990s. They say the family of the brilliant architect still lives there, and it’s a private property – but who had ever cared about such trifles here? Anyway, the house is still there, and we owe it Melnikov’s descendants, but also to dozens of experts and enthusiasts both here and abroad.
    While the house is not open for general public, you can still see it from the outside, the address is Krivoarbatsky pereulok, 10.

    P.S. You may wonder what’s special about this three-storeyed building? There are no edges, it’s round, like a Roman column. And look at the windows – ever seen any rhomb-shaped windows like these?
    This place surely is not the only one built by Melnikov, hopefully I’ll have time one day to write about his other masterpiece, the Rousakov Club.

    The contacts belong to the Russian Avantgarde Foundation (image copyright, too), and it is NOT located in Melnikov House

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    Princess Turandot Fountain

    by Odiseya Written Dec 9, 2012

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    Princess Turandot Fountain

    I like fountain and sculpture and try to learn more of it.
    This is what I found out about this golden-like sculpture and fountain:
    It named Princess Turandot Fountain.
    Princess Turandot Fountain is build next to the Vakhtangov Theater on Stary Arbat. It was built in 1997 to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the staging this theater. Author is sculptor Alexander Burganov. Princess Turandot is the title character of play by Carlo Gozzi. This play is most celebrated production of this theater

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    Victor Tsoi Wall

    by Odiseya Written Dec 9, 2012

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    Victor Tsoi - in loving memory

    The Tsoi Wall (Russian: Стена Цоя, read: Stena Coya) is a graffiti-covered wall in Old Arbat street. It is dedicated to musician Viktor Tsoi and his band Kino. I spend time with my friends that are very involved in Russian culture and I learn many interesting things about its modern music.
    I think that music is best way to learn about some culture and to connect to it. I like Victor Tsoi music and it help me to learn Russian language.

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    Stary Arbat - feel the amosphere of city

    by Odiseya Updated Dec 9, 2012

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    Stary Arbat - walk with me

    Old Arbat (Russian: Старый Арбат, read: Stary Arbat) is famous old street in Moscow and in Russia in general. Arbat is Arabic word means suburb. It is about 20 minutes away from Kremlin.
    Today, this long pedestrian street with many cafe bars, shops and street artists is, in my opinion, best place in the City to feel the authentic atmosphere. At least, it is hard to be boring here. I am enjoying to see creative side of modern metropolis.
    To resume - this street has all - it is one of main landmarks of points of interest in city, it is historic walking areas and unique flea or street markets elements.
    Its cobblestone pats give us, visitors, very nice feeling of authentic historic trips. It remind me on Skadarlija street in Belgrade (and I sure that many other country has his similar Bohemian street). And it would be interesting for me to discover this "kind" of street in every country that I visit.

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    Let me entertain you...

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Sep 14, 2012

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    This road, from start to finish, is crawling with performers and artists and people who will show you something for a kopeck or two!!! Whatever time of day or night you go you can expect to see people parting money to attempt to ride a wonky bike in 3 tries,,, or to hold on to a turning bar in 3 tries,,, or you will see spray-paint artists making their masterpieces, pianists (yes! playing the street piano!) and a whole row of people eager to sketch you in a very old fashioned kind of way that seems to still draw in the crowds (mostly Russians)...

    Lined with a variety of restaurants - from the vodka bus to more civilised eateries and, of course, the odd souvineer shop, or two thrown in, not to mention the oldest latest matryoshka maker of the street. Of course there is the token Irish pub (everywhere has an Irish pub!) and the obligatory sushi bar (Moscow seems to have fallen in love with raw Japanese food!)...

    At night there are lots of motorbikes, drawn to one particular cafe. Mostly they are riders of bikes hanging out but one night we dined opposite this cafe and it was very uncomfortable when Moscow's equivalent to the Hells Angels showed up. They did not seem gentlemean to reason with!!!

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    El barrio de Arbat - Arbat Area

    by elpariente Updated Sep 7, 2012

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    En el siglo XIX fue una zona en la que vivían artistas , escritores , músicos, poetas e intelectuales , de hecho alguna de sus casas aún se conservan como museos
    En los años 80 se decidió peatonalizar esta calle y se ha convertido en un paseo obligado para los que vienen a Moscú , es una calle alegre , con gente por la calle , paseando , vendiendo, con cafés, restaurantes , museos , teatro y la Iglesia del Salvador sobre las arenas

    In the nineteenth century it was a living area where artists, writers, musicians, poets and intellectuals lived, in fact some of their houses have been preserved as museums
    In the 80s it was decided pedestrianise this street and it has become a must for those who come to Moscow, is a cheerful street, with people on the street, walking, selling, with cafes, restaurants, museums, theatre and the Church of the Savior on the sands
    The Foreign affairs Minister is not far away

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    Art Center

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 26, 2010

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    arbad street

    Arbad street was the art center during the communist period .Russian Artists tried to sell thair hand made works to the few tourists who visit the city .After the prestroika this place become very popular place to spend some time with many cafes ,restaurants even Mc donalds !!!.Now parallel to this street you can visit also in the New Arbad street with modern looking shops and malls.

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    Tschotschke bonanza

    by mikey_e Written Jul 12, 2008

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    Arbat Street
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    What better word to use for Arbat than tschotschke (in fact, this is probably where the word was invented). The Arbat - that is, the original Arbat - was Moscow's true bohemian quarter, where is artists and dreamers congregated and created, for better or for worse. Quite obviously, several decades of Communism helped ensure that the sort of atmosphere did not evolve in much the same way as it did in other European cities, but there are still vestiges of the old lifestyle in the Arbat. The streets are lined with shops selling handicrafts of various qualities, while the middle of the street is cramped with multitudes of vendors selling knock-off Soviet army goods and clothing, as well as matryoshka dolls, fabergé eggs and a healthy variety of Communist-era goods. This is a nice street walk down and inspect Russia's handicraft offerings, especially if you're not looking for anything in particular. Unlike in many other cities, Russian vendors are neither aggressive nor do they seem to really care about carrying through a sale at any cost, so you can simply admire without worry.

    The New Arbat, while keeping with the commercial spirit of the old, is far more garish and unattractive. It is a massive street, lined by shops selling everything, with a healthy abundance of cell phone shops. Not quite a boon for tourists intent on seeing rustic Russia.

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    Arbat in Winter

    by sennaya Updated Dec 27, 2007

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    In some ways Arbat street, a busy street of music, performers, vendors and cafes is a more peaceful vendor in Winter.

    There are many many souvenir vendors on the street and in shops.
    One large one has prices significantly lower amnd a huge selection.

    Interesting and high price cafes are the norm. For a bargain, go to the 2nd floor Stolovaya Cafe over the grocery...
    Here is a short clip of Arbat Street in Winter:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6L2817iE4k

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    Ulitsa Arbat

    by brazwhazz Written Nov 22, 2007

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    The Pushkins
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    Don't let the tourist trap warnings fool you -- Ulitsa Arbat is a must in Moscow. Even if you aren't up for street vendors and their Soviet memorabilia, there are historic, fading buildings to admire and some quality souvenir shops to check out. Also, as the only pedestrian street in Moscow, it is a welcome respite from the busy surrounding streets... even though it is animated in its own way.

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    Stary Arbat

    by el_ruso Written Aug 5, 2007
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    The Arbat street, the first pedestrianized shopping street in Moscow is way overhyped IMO. It is pleasant, but not architecturally significant overall. It does have a great number of stalls selling Russian souvenirs (at very inflated prices) and a number of stores selling high-end Russian handmade souvenirs. The latter are indeed worth the trek here, but be prepared to pay top dollar for them.

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  • Shopping on Arbat

    by Wisconsinguy Written Jul 17, 2006

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    There is a lot to see in this area just off of Red Square. Make sure to get a picture with some animals. The Monkey in the red pajamas is cool but just don't get your fingers near his face when you hold him. He Bites!

    There is much to see and much to buy. Don't pay too much!

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    Ulitsa Arbat

    by aukahkay Written Jul 3, 2006

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    Ulitsa Arbat
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    Ulitsa Arbat is Moscow's most charming and lively pedestrian street. Once a bohemian quarter of the city, littered with cafes crammed full of the capital's intellectual elite, Ulitsa Arbat still retains a vibrant and artistic air today, with souvenir stalls selling traditional Russian gifts, artists offering original canvases and street performers entertaining the shoppers.
    The street boasts an impressive selection of cafes, restaurants and bars, where you can sample everything from a decent cup of coffee and a French pastry, to a genuine Lebanese shawerma (kebab).
    If you visit Ulitsa Arbat, you will normally start your walk from Arbatskaya ploschad, dominated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs building, one of the Seven Sisters in Stalinist Gothic architecture.

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    A photo with President Putin

    by aukahkay Written Jun 27, 2006

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    Vladimir Putin and myself on Arbat Street

    As I was strolling along Arbat Street on my recent trip to Moscow, I recognised from a distance a familiar figure dressed in lounge suit. Lo and behold, he was none other than Russian President Vladimir Putin.
    No, he was not the real Vladimir Putin, but rather, his waxwork figure. For 100 roubles, I got to pose for a photograph with him.

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    Arbat Streets

    by Kap2 Written Apr 23, 2006

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    Bulat Okudzhava and me
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    Old Arbat is a walking street, and Novy Arbat is a big traffic street and parallel to its older brother.

    Old Arbat
    Is a historic street with beautiful sculptors and people selling art, 'Soviet' tat and pets!

    Novy Arbat, is worth viewing for its brutal Soviet architect, like concrete book case.

    The root of the name "Arbat" probably comes from the Salvonic word gorbat, meaning "hilly ground", although it is equally as possible that the word stems from the Arabic word arbad, meaning "suburb".

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