Cathedral of Christ the Redeemer, Moscow

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  • Cathedral of Christ the Redeemer
    by illumina
  • Christ the Savior Cathedral
    Christ the Savior Cathedral
    by fachd
  • Cathedral of Christ the Redeemer
    by fachd
  • jorgejuansanchez's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Feb 16, 2014

    The last time that I visited the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was in the year 2007. It is very centrically located, almost next door to the Kremlin.
    I crossed on foot the Patriarch Bridge and entered the Cathedral. Religious fervor in Russia is great. All the women, without exception, covered their heads with a handkerchief. In Spain, for instance, very few women do it. Men had their shapkas in their hands.
    Inside there was a ceremony going on. It is usually very long, so I did not stay until the end. Furthermore, in the Orthodox’s churches the faithful people remain always standing; there are no benches like in the catholic cathedrals, where you can sit down.
    By the way, although there were several tourists, no one dared to take pictures during the ceremony.
    In front of the cathedral stands the statue devoted to the Czar Alexander II.
    The old cathedral was demolished by orders of the criminal Stalin (in 1931), but its reconstruction is really wonderful and its form is similar to the disappeared one. You notice at once that it is not old (it was reconstructed at the turn of the XX century in the same place were the previous one was destroyed), but anyway the visit leaves you nice feelings. I left the place with very high spirits.

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    Christ The Saviour

    by kris-t Updated Jul 8, 2013

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    Moscow, Christ The Saviour
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    The temple was constructed on a vow given by sovereign Alexander I in gratitude for saving fatherland "from the Gauls invasion". The temple was supposed to be built on Vorobyovy mountains under the project of architect Vitberg. Subsequently "on intrigues against the builder" the project of a temple and a place of construction were changed. The new place was chosen not so close to the Kremlin, so that the temple was dissonant to its ensemble, but at the same time so that connection of the temple with ancient constructions of the Kremlin and the Red Square was felt.
    Sept. 10, 1839 the solemn laying of the present temple in Russian-Byzantian style took place. It was constructed under the project of architect K.A.Ton, at the expense of treasury with attraction of people's donations. Two cemeteries and mammoth remnants were found during digging a foundation ditch. The temple was consecrated in April, 10, 1883 during the days of crowning of the emperor Nikolay I. Side - chapels were consecrated later: in June, 12 - the side-chapel of St.Nikolay Chudotvorets and in July, 8 - of St. Alexander Nevsky. K.A.Ton has created the project of a five-domed temple with big central and four angular turrets with 14 bells.
    The banners and keys of the conquered cities were transferred to the temple. 640 candlesticks were built in a dome for illumination, and 600 more around the lattice on choruses. First electric street lamps in Moscow appeared on the square in front of the temple. The height of the temple was 103 m. In December, 5 1931. the temple was blown up. Subsequently the foundation ditch was used for the construction of swimming - pool Moscow . In 1994 the pool was closed. In January, 1995, the solemn laying of the revived temple took place. Now the construction is completed. The temple has active museum, excursions are held and the viewing platform is arranged.

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    The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    by Odiseya Updated Dec 5, 2012

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    The Cathedral of Jesus Christ the Savior (Russian: Храм Христа Спасителя, read: Khram Khrista Spasitelya) was built in period from 1839 till 83 in commemoration of the Patriotic War of 1812 (war against Napoleon army). It was consecrated 26th May 1883, on the day of coronation Alexander III. The temple was became the highest building in Moscow (103.5 m) and the largest church in Russia housing 10 000 praying persons at the same time.Author of project was architect Konstantin Thon. Model for design was famous Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (today Istambul), Turkey.
    It was destroyed on 5th December 1931 by communist government. In its place was built swimming pools. The temple was re-built since 1990 till 2000 by the drawings and old photographs. The current structure of the temple was consecrated 19th August 2000.
    The temple has become a symbol of the Russian people to return to their roots and religion.
    It was build in two part. One upper is beautiful gallery with grand altar. Lower part was real church with altar where priest serve the liturgy. There is also a gift shop, and long hall of gallery. The no fee but the guard can stop you to enter if you not proper dress. Scarf for head is not necessary or dress, but no skinny close or high heels (as I saw) not allowed.

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  • littlebush's Profile Photo

    Christ the saviour church

    by littlebush Written Sep 29, 2012

    By the river just a short walk from the kremlin this church was only built in the 90's after the soviets pulled down the original after the revolution.
    It's free to get in and we were lucky to get a friend if mrs who works there to show us around, we got access to the roof terrace for great 360 views of the city and river and Peter the great statue.
    Down in the lower level was a great collection of icons and photo exhibition.

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    Christ the Savior Cathedral

    by fachd Written Jul 12, 2012

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    Christ the Savior Cathedral is located outside the Kremlin on the north side of Moskva River not far from State University. Looking from outside the architecture had Byzantine influences, and then again most of the cathedral in Moscow (Russia) does so. It has the largest and heaviest door in the world. The interior is amazing, the ceiling is covered with frescoed of Christ, Virgin Mary, angels and toward the front is like a small church decorated with frescoed and statues, and even have a spiral with dome. Oh my god the Russians must spent fortune for the cathedral.

    The cathedral was constructed from 1839 designed by St. Petersburg architect Konstantin Ton, but typical despot Stalin ordered for destruction in 1931 to make Palace of Soviets. The project was abandoned as it was too heavy for the ground.

    The design would have stood over 400 meters high with great whopping statue of Lenin on top reaching to the sky. Instead during Khuruschev they built the largest open air swimming pool in the world with 27degree Celsius kept all year round. After the collapse of Soviets Union, in 1994 the Cathedral was rebuilt and completed in 2000 and now it’s a practice church and museum.

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    by illumina Written Aug 8, 2011

    The tallest orthodox church in the world!

    Stalin ordered the demolition of the original Cathedral in 1931 in order to build a monument to the new order - the Palace of the Soviets. However it was discovered _after_ the demolition that the land wasn't capable of taking the weight of the planned, massive, construction, and that, lack of funds, and the outbreak of WWII meant that land remained unoccupied, other than a flooded foundation hole which later became the Moskva Pool (the world's largest open air swimming pool - they must have really liked having these titles!).

    Construction of the new cathedral began in 1994 and was completed in 2000.

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    Cathedral of Christ the Savior

    by mallyak Written Dec 1, 2010

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    Architect Vladimir Shukhov was responsible for building several of Moscow's landmarks during early Soviet Russia. The Shukhov Tower, just one of many hyperboloid towers designed by Shukhov, was built between 1919 and 1922 as a transmission tower for a Russian broadcasting company. Shukhov also left a lasting legacy to the Constructivist architecture of early Soviet Russia. He designed spacious elongated shop galleries, most notably the Upper Trade Rows (GUM) on Red Square, bridged with innovative metal-and-glass vaults.

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    The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    by ValbyDK Updated May 1, 2010

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    Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    We went on a long walk around the Kremlin and along the Moscow River. We passed the ‘Cathedral of Christ the Saviour’ with a very turbulent history. The cathedral was originally built in 1839, but demolished in 1931 to create room for the ‘Palace of Soviets’, which was to be a kind of big socialist monumentbuilding.

    However, because of bad economy, problems with flooding, and war, the palace was never built. For years the foundation hole served as a swimming pool - the largest the world had ever seen.

    With the end of the Soviet rule, the cathedral was rebuilt and inaugurated in August 2000. We didn’t go inside the cathedral, but just admired the highest Orthodox cathedral in the world from the outside.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    by HORSCHECK Updated Sep 20, 2009

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    The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour is the largest orthodox church in the world.

    The original cathedral was built between 1839 and 1883, but destroyed by Stalin in 1933.

    His idea was to build a massive Palace of Soviets topped by a Lenin statue on this site, which in fact was never built as the ground wasn't stable enough.

    An open air swimming pool was constructed instead.

    Between 1995 and 1998 the Cathedral was rebuilt. Nowadays it also houses a free museum which exhibits many photos about the interesting history of the Cathedral.

    Directions:
    The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour is located on the northern bank of the Moskva River just in the city centre (Metro: Kropotkinskaya).

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of Christ the Savior

    by MikeAtSea Written Apr 7, 2008

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    The original Cathedral of Christ the Savior was built over 44 years to celebrate the 1812 victory over Napoleon. It was completed in 1883. Stalin had the church destroyed in 1931, but it was rebuilt using mostly private funds in 1999. The new church is a replica of the original. Note that it took 44 years the first time and only 4 years the second to complete the church! Things certainly have changed using modern technology.
    One interesting tidbit is that it took three attempts to blow up the church in 1931. Stalin planned to build a huge Palace of the Soviets on the cleared land, but engineers determined that the land was too boggy. In the 60 years intervening, the space was used for a variety of things, including a year-round swimming pool!

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  • Skripa's Profile Photo

    Christ the Saviour church

    by Skripa Written Jan 7, 2008

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    this church has a very interesting and long history. it has an amazing spirit of russian culture and a very beautiful places to walk around!
    u cam't make pictures inside of it and u will have to turn on ur cell phone.

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  • sennaya's Profile Photo

    Christ the Savior, on the Moscow river

    by sennaya Written Dec 3, 2007

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    Exquisitely built since 1961, the current church is beautiful inside and out. Modern craftsmanship still lives in russia if you have money!

    In winter it is a refreshing warm oasis. Not many churches are heated.
    Entrance is free, either through the main door, or down on the right side stairs through the chapel.

    Often you might se a wedding or get lucky and hear a choral service.

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    by brazwhazz Written Nov 23, 2007

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    It's huge

    It is hard to believe that this cathedral only dates back to 1997!

    Like many religious buildings of its time, the original Cathedral of Christ the Saviour, originally built from 1839 to 1883, was demolished during the Stalin era. While there were plans to build the ultimate Soviet building -- a 315-m high "Palace of the Soviets", topped with a 100-m high statue of Lenin -- in its place, the site ended up being used for the world's largest swimming pool.

    The exterior of the new cathedral was built from 1994 to 1997, with ongoing work inside. I wish I could say something about the interior, but we passed in front of the cathedral after it had closed. That being said, according to our travel guide, admission is free the cathedral is open daly form 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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    CHRIST THE SAVIOUR CATHEDRAL

    by stevemt Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

    This place is amazing considering its history.

    This Cathedral is the largest orthodox cathedral in europe. It was origionally built on public donations during 1839-1883. The Cathredral was destroyed on Stalins order in 1931, but by 18/04/1998 it had been restored.

    This is a must see for all.

    The main cathredral chamber is awe inspiring. Underneath there is a beautiful chapel and a musem.

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  • tere1's Profile Photo

    Christ the Savior Cathedral

    by tere1 Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    the cathedral
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    The enormous gleaming golden dome and gigantic structure of the Cathedral of Christ the Savior is visible from all over central Moscow and is the largest church in Russia.

    The Cathedral of Christ the Savior was originally commissioned by Emperor Alexander I . In celebration of Russia's victory against Napoleon and having driven the French leader and his troops from Russian soil, the Emperor thanked God and the Russian people for the triumph and ordained the construction of a memorial temple to Christ the Savior.

    Clad in marble and granite, with huge bronze doors covered in relief depictions of the saints, the cathedral is an awesome statement of the power and prestige of the Orthodox Church and one of Moscow's most impressive ecclesiastical buildings.

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