Kremlin, Moscow

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  • the Dormition Cathedral
    the Dormition Cathedral
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Canon and Cannon Balls inside the Kremlin Walls
    Canon and Cannon Balls inside the...
    by Chinggis_n_Borte
  • St. Nicholas Tower, 2013
    St. Nicholas Tower, 2013
    by kris-t
  • Chinggis_n_Borte's Profile Photo

    The Kremlin - Historic and All Powerful

    by Chinggis_n_Borte Written May 3, 2014
    Canon and Cannon Balls inside the Kremlin Walls

    The official website of the Kremlin is: http://www.kreml.ru/en/

    The website gives details about different exhibitions at various museums in the Kremlin, and information about entry times and ticket prices. There is historical information on the website too.

    The Kremlin, Russia’s seat of power, is much more than a place of government. It is an historic place of much significance, and it has many relics and artefacts.

    The Kremlin was originally founded and connected to Tsarist rule. Tsars and Tsarinas were coronated there. It is a very large complex. And now, of course there are no Tsars (but one may debate that the current leader is like a Tsar or a dictator) but it is the seat of power for the Russian government, and for a long time, the Kremlin had and has had much power and influence in the world.

    Inside the red Kremlin walls are several cathedrals and Orthodox churches with exuberant and shiny golden domes, and there are also exhibitions about the Tsars' and Tsarinas' clothing or coronation. There is an armoury. There are cannons. There are immaculate gardens.

    There are many police and guards driving around and patrolling the grounds. There are also helicopter helipads, and we witnessed the landing and the taking-off of two helicopters from the Kremlin’s helipad.

    I found it quite contradictory and very interesting that the Communist party chose to use the Kremlin as their seat of government, which has cathedrals and Tsarist history, both anathemas to the Communist ideology, instead of breaking with the past they revolted against in 1917.

    The Communists assassinated the last Tsar Nicholas II and his wife and children (The Romanovs) but now, Tsarist artefacts and history are almost celebrated, and the Russian government makes money from tourists, Russians and foreigners alike, who visit the Tsarist palaces, museums and churches, in mass numbers, looking at remnants of the opulent Tsarist past. It seems a bit like “blood money”.

    And what at first blush seems like another amazing contradiction is that within the Kremlin grounds, symbols of religion are mixed with symbols of war. There are churches, a giant cannon, and an armoury.

    Upon further reflection, I guess people have been involved in wars in the name of religions for centuries. So weapons and church bells may not be such a strange combination after all.

    And in Monarchist regimes across Europe, and in Vatican history, religion and state were intertwined.

    So mixing cannons with church bells may not be or have seemed unusual at all.

    People whole heartedly believed the King, Emperor or Tsar was in power according to Divine Right, and that it was their station in life to be King, Emperor or Tsar, and for the peasants to be peasants and to pay tithes to their local parish, and not to question the status quo.

    The churches had their own armies and tracts of land.

    Churches wielded immense power and had incredible wealth. And few people questioned it.

    The website has good information about the exhibitions. Check their information for any public holidays, special events, opening hours, and ticket prices.

    The location of the ticket office is near Alexander Garden, or Alexandrovsky Sad metro station. The ticket office is closed on Thursdays.

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    The Kremlin

    by Odiseya Updated May 4, 2013

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    The Kremlin

    The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: Моско́вский Кремль, read Moskovskiy Kreml) or simply the Kremlin is a historic complex at the heart of Moscow from witch the modern city develops trough century. This complex is framed by the Moskva River (on south), Saint Basil's Cathedral and Red Square (on east) and the Alexander Garden (on west part).
    It is the best known of kremlins (Russian citadels) and includes four palaces, four cathedrals and the enclosing walls and towers. The complex serves as the official residence of the President of the Russian Federation.

    Notice: Regular price is 350 RRuble, if you have a ISIC or ITIC card you can enter with only 100 RRuble.

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    The Cathedral of the Archangel

    by Odiseya Updated Dec 3, 2012

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    The Cathedral of the Archangel

    The Cathedral of the Archangel (Russian: Архангельский собор, read: Arkhangelsky sobor) is a Russian Orthodox church dedicated to the Archangel Michael.
    It is located in Cathedral Square in Kremlin between the Great Kremlin Palace and the Ivan the Great Bell Tower.
    Here was the main necropolis of the Tsars of Russia until the relocation of the capital to St. Petersburg. It was constructed between 1505 and 1508 by design of Italian architect Aleviz Fryazin Noviy on the spot of an older cathedral that was built in 1333.
    For me it was interesting to see the fresco call "Serbian miracle workers". That fresco display St. Sava (Serbian prince Rastko Nemanjić) and his father Stefan Nemanja known by his monk name as Venerable Simeon. This is a large fresco, made from 1652 till 1666.
    Also, there is a fresco that represent Prince Lazar Hrebeljanović, who led Serbian army which confronted a massive invading army of the Ottoman Empire commanded by Sultan Murat I in famous Battle of Kosovo on 28 June 1389.
    Both fresco is in northeast part of cathedral. If I correctly remember (photo not allowed) in last pillar in front of altar. From entrance first is fresco "Serbian miracle workers" just above the sarcophagus. And fresco St. Lazar is behind same pillar but higher placed.
    Life of St. Sava in book call Life (Serbian Cyrillic: Житије, read: Zhitije), who was by Nicene patriarch 1219th appointed as the first Serbian archbishop, is studied on all Russian universities and schools. Here are also studied and the memory of his father Simeon call Tripikon, talking about how to deal with Hilandar and Nomokanon, which is said to be the first Serbian Proceedings Act witch author is St. Sava Serbsky.

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    The State Kremlin Palace

    by Odiseya Written Dec 1, 2012

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    The State Kremlin Palace

    The State Kremlin Palace (Russian: Государственный Кремлёвский Дворец), formerly and unofficially still better known as the Kremlin Palace of Congresses (RussianКремлёвский Дворец съездов) is, surprisingly, a large modern building inside the historic Kremlin.
    The building was built at the initiative of Nikita Khrushchev and it serve as modern arena for Communist Party meetings.

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    The Kremlin Armory

    by Odiseya Written Dec 1, 2012

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    The Kremlin Armory

    The Kremlin Armory (Russian: Оружейная палата) is one of the oldest museums of Moscow, established in 1808.
    This building is part of the Grand Kremlin Palace’s complex. It is situated in the building constructed in 1851 by architect Konstantin Ton.

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    Terem Churches

    by Odiseya Updated Dec 1, 2012

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    Terem Churches - golden cupolas

    Terem churches is very interesting religious building. I never see nothing like this before.
    Some interesting information:
    Terem churches is a complex of churches build on the West from the church of the Deposition of the Robe. It can be spotted by its 11 golden cupolas.
    These churches are located at different levels and connected with the passages:
    1. Five southern cupolas belong to the Verkhospassky Cathedral;
    2. The central cupola belongs to the church of Crucifixion of Jesus Christ that is situated to the north from the Verkhospassky Cathedral;
    3. The church of the Resurrection Slovusheye is situated to the north from the church of Crucifixion of Jesus Christ and has five northern cupolas.
    4. The Church of St. Ekaterina the Great Martyr that is on the tsarina’s hall way (“On Senyakh”) is located below the Church of the Resurrection Slovusheye and its apses face the western porch of the church of the Deposition of the Robe.

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    The Cathedral of St. John Climacus

    by Odiseya Written Dec 1, 2012

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    The Cathedral of St. John Climacus is today place of bell tower of Ivan the Great was built in 1505—08 (two lower and a part of the third levels with height about 60 m, architect - Bon Fryazin).
    Some interesting detail:
    With his height of 81 m in the period from 17th till 19th centuries it was the highest building in Moscow. For a long time the tsar’s order had been valid prohibiting construction of buildings in Russia higher than this bell tower. It was built of brick and white stone.

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    Orthodox Kremlin

    by Odiseya Written Dec 1, 2012

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    Orthodox cathedrals

    It was absolute enjoy visit Kremlin and explore this incredible place. I have opportunity to visit and Kremlin famous cathedral. It was very helpful to have a fantastic host and guide like my friend Jelena.
    Three Russian Orthodox cathedrals, together with the six other buildings surrounding the main cathedral square in Kremlin. There are: 1. The Cathedral of the Dormition; 2. Cathedral of the Annunciation and 3. Cathedral of the Archangel Michael. There are also two Russian Orthodox churches of the Metropolitans and Patriarchs of Moscow: the Church of the Twelve Apostles and Church of the Deposition of the Virgin's Robe.

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    The Kremlin

    by simonli625 Updated Nov 20, 2012

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    The assumption Cathedral
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    The Kremlin is a fortified complex with building that dated back to 13th century. It is right next to the red square.

    It consists of four palaces, four cathedrals and numerous towers. The Kremlin is huge and make sure that you have a nice pair of walking shoes on.

    It is also the current residence for Russia Federation president Putlin.

    The cathedral square is the most grand square within Kremlin. You are surrounded by the bell-tower of Ivan the great, the Archangle Cathedral, the assumption Cathedral, and the Patriarch's Palace. Their golden and tin domes are shinning brightly under the sun. You should take your time and visit all the Cathedrals.

    The Archangel Cathedral was the burial place of the Great Princes, local princes and Tsars. They have free maps in different language so that you can identified who is who in the coffin. Although all the English one was gone when I visited.

    The Patriarch's palace housed the museum of applied art and everyday life of 17th century. They have quite some extensive collection of Russia art, jeweler, and furniture for a rich family. I especially like the gilded carved iconostasis which is originally from the demolished Ascension monastery.

    The annunciation cathedral used to be the private church of Russian grand princes and Tsars. Inside this cathedral , it hose the multi-tier iconostasis of the cathedral includes almost a hundred icons situated in six rows.

    During my visit, there is also a lot of soldiers from the Army were given a tour of the Kremlin as well.

    I didn't have a chance to go into the Armoury Chamber because of the strange selling hours for the ticket. There are 4 possible admission time to the Armoury Chamber: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. The ticket office is only start selling ticket for the Armoury chamber half an hour before hand but you have to make sure that you are already inside the ticket office during that time. I was number 4 - 5 in the line and the tickets was already sold out. I understand that there is another ticket office outside and maybe they sell more tickets there?

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    The Kremlin

    by JessieLang Written Oct 19, 2012

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    The Kremlin is a huge complex, full of churches, cathedrals, palaces and government buildings. Most of the churches are in Cathedral Square. The Assumption Cathedral, built in the 1470s, is where the Tsars were crowned.

    A lot of the buildings are off limits because it is the seat of the Russian government. (Putin lives in one of them.) The Kremlin is enclosed by high brick walls, sort of triangular in shape, with about 20 defense towers at intervals around it. The walls were built in the late 15th Century.

    Russia likes things “big.” The Tsar Bell is the world’s biggest bell, weighing over 200 tons. It was cast in 1735, but it cooled unevenly and an 11-ton chunk broke off. It then remained in the casting pit for about a century before they hauled it out and displayed it on the pedestal where it sits now. It is beautifully decorated.

    The bronze Tsar Cannon is one of the world’s biggest and oldest cannons. It was cast in 1586 and weighs 39 tons. Since 1960 it has been on a gun carriage in Ivanovskaya Square, surrounded by giant cannon balls. I don’t know where the cannon was before 1960, but it has never been fired.

    The Armory was built in the 16th Century as a warehouse for Kremlin weapons, but in 1814 it was turned into a museum to house Russia’s national treasures. We saw Ivan the Terrible’s throne (wood, faced with ivory), Catherine the Great’s ball gowns, Faberge eggs, etc. No photos allowed though.

    There is a great deal to see, and it probably can't be done in one day. Either allow lots of time, or pick a few favorites to look at.

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    Kremlin-jewels

    by littlebush Written Oct 2, 2012

    If you're into national jewels then this is for you. I think I was spending 500 roubles on seeing the cathedrals and towers of kremlin but was just the crown jewels which for me was boring. Will do the other bits of kremlin next time

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    Kremlin - Frescos / Frescoes

    by elpariente Updated Sep 16, 2012

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    La plaza de las Catedrales no solo impresiona en el exterior , sino que cuando entres te quedaras muy sorprendido por su magnificencia y por los frescos que representan escenas y Santos de la Religión Ortodoxa
    ne cespitas hacer la visita con tiempo para disfrutarla

    The Cathedrals square is not only impressive from the outside , but when you visit them inside you will be surprised with their magnificence and the frescoes that represent scenes and Saints of the Orthodox Religion
    You need some time to enjoy the visit

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    Plaza de las Catedrales / Cathedrals Square

    by elpariente Updated Sep 16, 2012

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    Lo primero que se siente es asombro cuando se entra en esta plaza Que ha sido el centro espiritual de Rusia y lo segundo es que no sabes por donde empezar, pues quieres entrar en todas estas catedrales e iglesias que son impresionantes, así que tómatelo con calma, dedícale tiempo y visítalas disfrutando sus cúpulas , sus frescos y si puedes lee algo de su historia
    Las tres catedrales que le dan el nombre a esta plaza son : La Catedral de la Asunción, La Catedral de la Anunciación y la Catedral del Arcangel San Miguel Miguel. En la plaza tambien podemos ver la Iglesia de los Doce Apóstoles, El Palacio de las Facetas, La Iglesia del Manto de la Virgen y el Campanario de Ivan El Grande.
    No te la pierdas !!!

    The first thing you feel is surprise when entering this square which has been the spiritual center of Russia and the second thing is you do not know where to start, because you would like to enter at the same time in all of these impressive cathedrals and churches , so take it easy , spend time and visit them enjoying their domes, frescoes and if you read some history it will be more interesting.
    The three cathedrals that give the name to the square are: The Cathedral of the Assumption, the Cathedral of the Annunciation and the Cathedral of Saint Michael Archangel . In the square we can also see the Church of the Twelve Apostles, The Palace of Facets, The Church of the Mantle of Our Lady and the Belfry of Ivan the Great.
    Do not miss it!

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    Taynitsy Gardens

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 16, 2012

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    It is a large park within the Kremlin walls but it is free to wander through. It is also where you will need to come to purchase your tickets to enter the Kremlin Complex. You will find a cloakroom (you cannot take large bags into the Kremlin Complex) as well as a shop.

    Somewhere in this park there is an oak tree, planted by Yuri Gagarin on April 14, 1961, when he returned home from his space mission.

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    The Kremlin

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Sep 16, 2012

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    State Kremlin Palace & The Poteshny Palace
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    The Kremlin, being a fortified complex, is surrounded by it's famous, towered, red walls. The lls are 3.5 - 6.5 meters thick, 5 - 19 meters in height and their 2235 meter length engulfs the 275,000 sq meters that makes up The Kremlin. Wear your comfortable shoes.

    There are 20 towers:
    Borovitskaya, Blagoveschenskaya, Vodovzvodnaya, Taynitskaya, Beklemishevskaya, First Unnamed, Second Unnamed, Petrovskaya, Konstantino-Eleninskaya, Nabatnaya, Tsarskaya, Spasskaya, Senatskaya, Nikolskaya, Middle Arsenalnaya, Corner Arsenalnaya, Komendantskaya, Troitskaya, Oruzheynaya and Kutafya.
    The tallest tower, at 74 metres, is the Troizkaya.

    Immediately up is the State Kremlin Palace - Built in 1961 it was the Palace of Congresses. The auditorium seats 6000 people.

    Down the street to the side of the State Kremlin Palace is a fairy tale building. It is the Potehny Palace. You cannot go down this street but you can see it. It was the office of the police, then it was the home of the Commandment of Moscow. Now it is the office to the Commandment - thus explaining why general public do not have access!

    Opposite the State Kremlin Palace in a mustard coloured building with many canons lined up along it. This is now used as barracks and guards prevent members of the public from getting anywhere near it!

    The Tsars Canon is a busy place to be and you can almost entirely forget about getting a photograph of it without somebody in the shot!!! Apparently the measurements of this canon are very unusual. It is one of the largest and oldest canons.

    The Senate Building... as since 1991 it has been the official residence of the President of the Russian Federation, you cannot get anywhere near it!!!

    In no time you will arrive at Cathedral Square which is quite stunning and beautiful.

    The gold onion, domed, church with the most fantastical doorways is the Dormition Cathedral. The original was built in 1326, a rebuild was done in the 1400s but collapsed before it was fully completed (an earthquake rather than cowboy builers!) In 1475 the building of the current cathedral commenced and it has stood, beautifully, ellaborately and solidly ever since.

    The other gold, onion domed church, with the white walls, is the Cathedral of the Annunciation. It is one of the most important churches in Russia.

    The third cathedral in the square in of the Archangel. It has a gold dome but the majority are silver.

    Terem Palce nestles snuggle to the side of the Dormition Cathedral... another fairy tale building with golden domes... it is not open to the public.

    Exiting Cathedral Square you will walk past The Armoury (you need a special ticket for entrance). Inside there are jewels and the diamond collection but as I did not have a special ticket I was unable to go and marvel! To be fair, the Kremlin is so large, it took half a day just to wander around the outside of all the buildings. At the end of this time my children were feeling a little Kremlined-Out and I think asking them to go into any of the buildings would have been a step too far!!!

    The fianl buidling, that can be seen from far along the river, is the Great Kremlin Palace. It was built in 1846

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