Kremlin, Moscow

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  • the Dormition Cathedral
    the Dormition Cathedral
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  • Canon and Cannon Balls inside the Kremlin Walls
    Canon and Cannon Balls inside the...
    by Chinggis_n_Borte
  • St. Nicholas Tower, 2013
    St. Nicholas Tower, 2013
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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Your entrance to Fairy Tale Land

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The Kremlin is a fortified complex containing palaces, offices and churches. It has practically always been here but it was Vladimir Lenin who moved the Soviet government from Petrograd to Moscow in 1918. He also had his residence here. Whilst the government of The Russian Federation is seated in The Russian White House, The Kremlin still conjures up and oozes the image of political power.

    No trip is complete to Moscow without a trip to The Kremlin.
    You are not premitted to take bags into the Kremlin. Well, I had a small handbag and that was ok but my husband's tiny rucksack (no bigger than my bag) was not ok. We had to pay for the cloackroom and I am certain we were over-charged by the exceedingly large and scary lady who was in charge!
    The queue for Kremlin entrance tickets seemed to go on in its disorganised mass for ever and ever. Certainly a good, old, English queue would have made the process of getting into the booth o the ticket counter a much fairer system. As it stands though you just have to sharpen your elbows and be determined!
    The ticket list/prices were in both English and Russian. Yes, good luck with that! It was very unclear what was included with what ticket and, by the time I was up at the counter trying to use my fingers to communicate 2 adults and 2 children, the tyupe of ticket available to me was already decided... areas with limited numbers were already gone and out of the question. It was one of those occasions when I gave up carin g about anything other than having a ticket - any ticket - and got going!!!
    There is a website with visitor information but I don;t think there is a possibility to get tickets in advance and whatever info you gain rom the website, will probably evacuate your brains if your entrance experience is as utterly chaotic and horrible as ours!!!

    Once you have your tickets, exit the gardens back up onto the street level and join a queue (this time a tradition queue where people stand patiently one behind the other). This will take you to security/scanners etc... and then, after that, you are in,,, well, once you have crossed the bridge!

    In 1990 The Kremlin was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list and it is easy to see why.

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    La Armería del - Kremlin - Armory

    by elpariente Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    La Armeria fue inicialmente una fabrica de armas y de objetos de plata , oro y piedras preciosas, hasta que Pedro I envio los orfebres a San Petersburgo y desde entonces se convirtió en un museo , donde se guardan los grandes tesoros de los príncipes Rusos
    Podemos ver joyas de oro y plata , colecciones de armas , objetos de plata , trajes y atributos reales , arneses de gala, carruajes...
    El lujo ,la riqueza y la belleza que se admira en este museo es excepcional y desde luego vale la pena visitarlo
    Durante la visita me surgieron los siguientes pensamientos :
    Los Romanov , los embajadores y las personas que hacían los regalos vivían en un mundo inimaginable
    El que todos estos objetos se hayan conservado, despues de una historia complicada, en la que aparecen muchas ideologías en que todo lo que hay en el museo no encaja muy bien con sus ideas, le da un mérito aun mayor a este museo

    The armory was originally a weapons factory and also made objects of silver, gold and precious stones, until Peter I sent the goldsmiths to St. Petersburg and since then it became a museum, where they keep the greatest treasures of the Russian princes
    We can see gold and silver jewelry, weapons collections, silverware, costumes and real attributes, gala harnesses, carriages ...
    The luxury, wealth and beauty which we admire in this museum is exceptional and certainly worth a visit
    During my visit I came the following thoughts:
    The Romanovs, ambassadors and those that gave the gifts were living in a world inimaginable
    The fact that all these objects have been preserved, after a complicated story, in which there were many ideologies that should be against of everything that is in the museum , gives even greater merit to this museum

    % Cr% b

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    Los superlativos / The superlatives

    by elpariente Updated Sep 14, 2012

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    La campana que nunca tocó y el cañón que nunca disparó
    El cañon pesa unas 40 toneladas y lo fundieron en bronce en el año 1586. Tiene grabado un retrato de el Zar Fyodor. Imaginas como se podrían manejar las bolas para cargarlo
    La campana de 210 Tns. se fundió con el bronce de la original que se cayó durante un incendio . Cuando estaban fundiendo la nueva campana se desató un nuevo incendio y al intentar apagarlo se desprendió el trozo de 12 Tns.

    The bell that never player and the Cantón that never fired
    The gun weighs 40 tons and is bronze melted in 1586. It has engraved a portrait of Tsar Fyodor. Imagine how them should move the big balls to load them in the cannon
    The bell, of 210 tns , was casted with the brass od the original bell tha fall down from its tower during a fire. When they were casting the new bell , a fire started and when they tryed to cool it down a big piece of 12 tns was loosed

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Kremlin

    by elpariente Updated Sep 11, 2012

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    Su nombre proviene del Ruso ( Kreml = fortaleza ). Hay muchas fortalezas en Rusia , pero normalmente cuando se habla del Kremlin se entiende que estamos hablando del de Moscú
    Es un recinto amurallado que está al lado del río Moscova y en él que hay edificios militares, administrativos y religiosos donde han tomado grandes decisiones de la Historia Rusa por hombres como Napoleón , Lenin, Stalin, Kruschev, Gorbachov, Yelsti, Putin...
    Se entra por la torre de Kutafia, donde se compran también las entradas y el precio son 700 Rublos más 350 Rublos para acceder la Armería .
    La Armería tiene limitado el número de visitas, por eso cuando se compra la entrada te asignan la hora en que puedes visitarlo

    Its name comes from the Russian (Kreml = Fortress). There are many fortress in Russia, but usually when talking about the Kremlin everybody understands that you are talking about Moscow
    It is a walled enclosure beside the river Moskva and there are military, administrative and religious buildings , where major decisions have been taken in Russian history by men like Napoleon, Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, Gorbachev, Yelsti, Putin ...
    You enter by the Kutafia tower where entries are also purchased and the price is 700 rubles and 350 rubles to enter the Armory.
    The Armory has limited number of visits, so when you buy your ticket they assign you the visiting hour

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Kremlin de Izmailovo

    by elpariente Written Aug 31, 2012

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    No tuvimos tiempo de visitarlo pero debe ser una especie de parque de atracciones cultural donde se recrea la historia y los cuentos Rusos
    los edificios con colores brillantes son muy llamativos
    we did not have time to visit it , but it must be a kind of culture park which recreates the history and the fairy tales of Russia
    The buildings with bright colors are very striking

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Kremlin, Second Nameless Tower

    by kris-t Updated Jul 29, 2012

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    Moscow, Kremlin
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    Second Nameless Tower:

    This tower was built about 1500 and has been preserved substantially in itsoriginal form. The octagonal tent-roofed superstructure dates from 1680. The tower was destroyed during the War of 1812 andreconstructed in 1816-19.
    The height of the tower is 34.15 m (112 ft).

    The next one:
    First Nameless Tower -
    This tower was built about 1500. In the reign of Ivan IV, itwas used for storing powder. An explosion in the powder magazine causedheavy damage and the tower was pulled down under Catherine II's plan forrebuilding the Kremlin. After being rebuilt it was blown up by the Frenchin 1812 and was again rebuilt by Osip I. Boveon the basis of old sketches and plans.
    The height of the tower is 30.2 m (99 ft).

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Kremlin Senate building

    by fachd Written Jul 12, 2012

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    The Tsar cannon is pointing that direction

    I am standing in front of Kremlin Senate building, which was off limit to the general public. The building was used by the Soviet Government for meeting after 1917 Revolution.

    Lenin and Stalin had private study room. Today the building is the official residence of the President of the Russian Federation.

    Actually the Tsar cannon weapon of mass destruction is pointing the building, could be another revolution is brewing, I am kidding.

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    The Kremlin Armory

    by fachd Written Jul 7, 2012
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    The Kremlin Armory located in Moscow Kremlin. It is the oldest and prestigious museum in Moscow, established in 1808. Here you’ll find collection of Tsarist artifacts, Russian and foreign jewelry and armor reflecting important Russian history from 12th to 20th century.

    Its worth visiting to see collection of armor, elaborate state coaches, collection of jewelry, Catherine the Great's coronation dress, Peter the Great's high boots, the Tsarist collection of decorative Eggs including the famous Siberian Railway Egg, ornaments like swords given by foreign dignitaries.

    Anyway they are too many to mention, go and see it. Unfortunately visitors are not being allowed taking neither photos nor video or do it at your own risk.

    Opening hours: Daily except Thursday, admission at 10:00, 12:00, 14:30 and 16:30. Sessions last 1 hour 45 mins. Tickets can be bought in the foyer or from the office in the Kutafiya Tower.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Kremlin, The Secret (Tainitskaya) Tower

    by kris-t Written Jul 2, 2012

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    View from The Great Stone Bridge
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    It's the central tower of the southern Kremlin’s wall. Built in 1485 by Anton Fryazin. The Tainitskaya was the most important tower to protect the river side of the Kremlin.

    The height of the tower is 38,4 m.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Kremlin, Peter Tower

    by kris-t Updated Jul 2, 2012

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    Peter Tower, Moscow
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    Peter Tower

    Peter Tower, built about 1500, is named after the first Metropolitan of Moscow, Peter, who was later canonized.

    It was frequently destroyed in the courseof its history - in 1612 by the Poles, in the reign of Catherine II inpreparation for the planned rebuilding of the Kremlin, and in 1812 by the French - but each time it was rebuilt (the last time - by the architect Osip I.Bove).

    The height of the toweris 27.15 m (89 ft).

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Kremlin, St. Nicholas (Nikolskaya) Tower

    by kris-t Written Jul 2, 2012

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    St. Nicholas Tower, 2013
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    A quadrangular pass-tower of the eastern Kremlin’s wall. It has a side-strelnitsa facing Red Square. Built in 1491 by Pietro Antonio Solari.

    The tower was blown up when the French invaders were leaving Moscow in 1812. It was rebuilt on the project of architect Ossip Bove in 1816-1819.

    The tower’s height without the star is 67,1 m and with the star is 70,4 m.

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    The Kremlin, never imagened to be here, ever!

    by Twan Written Feb 7, 2012

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    Kremlin

    The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: Московский Кремль, Moskovski Kremlin) is the geographical and historical center of the Russian capital Moscow. The name Kremlin is derived from the Russian word кремль (Kremlin), which means fortified town. Although the term in Dutch usually refers to the Kremlin, there are also other cities in Russia with a kremlin.

    The Moscow Kremlin is on the Red Square, on the left bank of the Moskva River. It is the seat of government of the Russian Federation and the former Soviet Union. At the time of the Cold War, the term was synonymous with the Kremlin, the Communist rulers. A Kremlin Watcher was a journalist who tried out the closed culture some information.

    The Kremlin in Moscow also houses a theater, a museum and numerous other attractions, including the Tsar Bell, Tsar Cannon and the various cathedrals and palaces.

    Across the department store GUM stands for a piece of the 2200-meter Kremlin Wall the Lenin Mausoleum.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Kremlin, Saviour Tower

    by kris-t Updated Oct 18, 2011

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    The Kremlin, Saviour Tower Sep 2010
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    The 70 m (230 ft) high Saviour Tower is the most magnificent of the Kremlin towers, the very symbol and emblem of Moscow. From time immemorial it has been the principal entrance to the Kremlin. The tower, like its two neighbors tothe north, was built in 1491 by the Italian architect Pietro Antonio Solari.
    The tower was given its name in 1658, when an iconof Christ was set up over the entrance. It was not tall originally but then it was added to in 1624-1625 by the architect Bazhen Ogurtsovand adorned with white-stone sculptures.

    The first clock was set into the tower in the 16th century. The Kremlin chimes that adorn the tower today were made in 1851-1852 by the brothers N. and P. Butenop.

    The gigantic mechanism (about 25 tons) of the carillon occupies three storeysof the tower. The clock now only strikes the hours.

    The 'ruby' star was installed in 1937. Sure it's not a real ruby. Just a name and color.

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    The Kremlin, The Corner Arsenal Tower

    by kris-t Updated Sep 30, 2011

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    The Corner Arsenal Tower
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    It's the most monumental Kremlin's corner tower.
    The tower has large round foundation and mighty walls.

    Long time ago it was used for protection and housed a water source for the fortresses garrison, as I know the spring water well is still there.

    Its height is 60.20 meters (197.51 feet).

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    Tickets to the Kremlin

    by Muscovite Updated Jul 20, 2011

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    The glass and steel block is the ticket office

    Citing the site:

    If you want to visit the Kremlin and its museums on your own you can purchase tickets in the ticket offices located at the Kutafiya Tower, in Aleksandrovsky Sad (the Aleksandrov Gardens), the Armoury Chamber and Cathedral Square.

    Ticket offices are open daily, except Thursdays, from 9:30 to 16:30.
    24-hour inquiry phone: (495) 695-37-76.

    International department
    phone: (495) 697-80-86, phone/fax: (495) 697-17-83,
    e-mail: interdep@kremlin.museum.ru

    Museums in Russia are very conservative, as it becomes to institutions of this kind; they usually don't do Internet sales - tickets or whatever.
    And I wouldn't go to their ticket office equipped with plastic cards only.

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