Red Square, Moscow

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  • Tour guides [экскурсии] brawl with police
    Tour guides...
    by Muscovite
  • Crowds entering through Resurrection Gate
    Crowds entering through Resurrection...
    by LynCod
  • GUM ice skating rink
    GUM ice skating rink
    by LynCod
  • Muscovite's Profile Photo

    Do-it-yourself 1-day tour: Kremlin + Red Square

    by Muscovite Written Jan 28, 2014

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    Tour guides [экскурсии] brawl with police

    If you come to Moscow for just one day, make sure it is not Thursday. The Kremlin is closed on Thursdays, and not being inside is the same as missing London’s Tower or Louvre in Paris.
    Morning: The Kremlin
    Depending on your time and energy (money, too), it may come with or without the Armoury (about 2 hours and about $20). I suggest you go there only with a very keen interest for Russian history and art, otherwise you may wind up overwhelmed and exhausted.
    Visiting one of the cathedrals is not much trouble, on the contrary, and you will have a rough idea of how a Russian church looks. Your kids will positively love both the Tsar Cannon and the Tsar Bell.
    Lunch:
    I am all for DIY lunch, too. Take something you can eat sitting on the bench – they won’t be happy if you sit on the grass in Alexander garden. You can buy some beverage from the street peddler, as for street food - frankly, I wouldn’t. - That only goes for summer. In winter you will have to ask the nearest McDonald’s for rescue, and it’s very crowded.
    Afternoon:
    That’s no problem with good funds – either a car with a guide, or a Red open-top bus for $20 (great in minus 20 C in winter!). If, however, you prefer your own two feet, turn right from Kutafya tower and stroll along Alexander garden to the Red Square – you cannot miss it. Take a picture of St. Basil’s cathedral, but don’t go inside – the staircase is narrow, and the steps are high. On your way back pass GUM – the architecture is worth it, the goods are not.
    Speaking of goods – you will see souvenir stands both in the Red Square and around former ‘Moscow’, now ‘Four Seasons’ hotel. Just keep in mind that those off-hand lacquer boxes for 300 roubles sold there are not the ones Russia is famous for.
    If you still have time and energy, take a walk around Manezh square – not for Mr. Tzereteli’s bronze zoo, and not for Manezh. The old one burned – or was burned - down in Luzhkov’s time, a very sad story for us Muscovites. But you folks won’t see the difference, especially as the new one is equipped with parking and all sorts of facilities. The old university is authentic, and so is the uphill Pashkov house (the Lenin Library’s old building), facing the Kremlin’s Borovitskaya tower and the Moscow river. Make sure you take photos of both, there are not many 18th century building left in Moscow, and who knows what happens in future with the ones that survived so far.
    Evening:
    With that you may well consider mission completed and return to your hotel – the metro station is right between the Library and the Kremlin. If, however, you are still alive and kicking, you may want to go along Vozdvizhenka street to Arbat street and hang out with fellow tourists –Muscovites have no business there.
    Bonus: if you stay at a remote hotel like Izmailovo – not my favourite, you will have to take metro to come downtown. Do not miss Ploschad Revolutsii (Revolution square) metro station – even the name is quite remarkable, you would expect to see it called ‘Market Economy Square’ these days. Take a good supply of batteries for your camera, this station with its mighty bronze statues is the flagship example of the grand style of the 1930s.

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  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Red square - see you there

    by Odiseya Updated Dec 1, 2012

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    Red square

    Main square is always good position to start explore the city.
    The Red Square (Russian: Красная площадь) is famous square probably in the world at least I think that. It is not only the central square of Moscow but it referred as center of Russia, because all major streets in city, all of them are connect to Russia's major highway, and all of this was originate from this square. I am fascinate with places that is seems that have a "big plan". From Kremlin, as focus of interest, this square divide it from Kitaj gorod witch, as it turn out later, become our "base". So, here we are and what we can see here?! Hmm...
    Look at the nice and huge building that surrounding the Square. First of all, there is big wall of Kremlin. I see Lenin's Mausoleum. The famous Saint Basil's Cathedral in the south. On the east side is the big GUM department store and Kazan Cathedral. On the north part is State Historical Museum, and The Iberian Gate and Chapel is somehow on northwest.
    The only sculptured monument on the square is a bronze statue of Kuzma Minin and Dmitry Pozharsky, and nearby is the so‑called Lobnoye Mesto, a circular platform where public ceremonies used to take place.
    The square itself is around 330 meters (1,100 ft) long and 70 meters (230 ft) wide.
    During our visit Moscow Red square is been partially close, because City is prepare for international festival of military orchestra.

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    La Plaza Bonita - The Nice Square

    by elpariente Written Sep 5, 2012

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    Esta plaza ha sido el centro político ( El Kremlin ) , religioso ( San Basilio ) y económico ( el mercado y los almacenes GUM )
    Se conocía como la Plaza del fuego por los frecuentes incendios que había en sus edificios de madera , posteriormente se le dió un nombre en eslavo ( krasnii) antiguo que significaba Bonita , al mismo tiempo que Roja que es el nombre final con que se ha quedado la plaza 8 No es coincidencia que se llame Roja )
    Es difícil encontrarla sin obras pues siempre se están montando tribunas para los desfiles militares
    This square has been the political (The Kremlin), religious (St. Basil) and economic (market and GUM) centre of Moscow
    It was called the Fire square due to the frequent fires that had in the wooden buildings of the market , then they gave a name in old Slavic (krasnii) that meant Nice , but also meant Red that is the final name that has been Square ( It is not a coincidence that is called Red)
    It is difficult to find it without works because they are always installing stands for the military parades

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    Capilla Iberian - Iveron Chapel

    by elpariente Updated Sep 5, 2012

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    Puerta de la Resurección
    En 1669 se construyó una puerta en la parte Norte de la Plaza Roja que albergaba una capilla con la réplica del icono milagroso, llamado el "cuidador de la puerta" y el original estaba guardado en el Monte Athos en un monasterio llamado Georgian Iveron
    De aquí proviene la palabra Iversky (Iberian ) que nada tiene que ver con España y es la que da el nombre a la puerta y a la capilla
    Antes de entrar en la Plaza Roja y en el Kremlin había que entra a rezar en esta capilla , cosa que hacía el mismísimo Zar
    En 1931 fue demolida para que pudieran entrar los grandes tanque a la Plaza Roja, pero fue reconstruida fielmente en 1996
    La vista que hay al entrar a la plaza Roja de San Basilio es imponente

    Resurrection Gate
    In 1669 it was built the gate in the northern part of the Red Square that housed a chapel with the miraculous icon replica, called the "gate keeper" and the original was kept at Mount Athos in a monastery called Georgian Iveron
    From this comes the word Iversky (Iberian) that has nothing to do with Spain and is what gives the name to the chapel and to the gate
    Before entering Red Square and the Kremlin there is a tradition to come to pray in this chapel, to the icon , and this was done even by the Czar
    In 1931 it was demolished so they could enter the big tank at the Red Square for the militar parades , but was faithfully reconstructed in 1996
    The view that there is when you enter Red Square and you see St. Basil's at the back is awesome

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Las mejores vistas - Red Square - The best views

    by elpariente Written Sep 3, 2012

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    Desde luego las mejores vistas de la Plaza Roja las tiene Pozharski y Minim
    Delante de San Basilio y mirando a la plaza Roja está la estatua en que Minim , próspero carnicero ,con una mano le entrega la espada y con la otra señala el Kremlin a el príncipe Pozharski pidiéndole que defienda la patria y que expulse al ejército Polaco

    Of course , Pozharsky and Minim have the best views of the Red Square
    In front of St. Basil's and looking the Red Square is the statue where Minim, prosperous butcher, with one hand gives the sword and with the other points the Kremlin to Prince Pozharsky asking him to defend the motherland and expel the Polish army

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Red Square is not so red

    by fachd Written Jul 3, 2012

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    If you haven’t visit Red Square you haven’t been to Moscow Russia. I thought the name Red Square (red) symbolized communism, how wrong I was. It was also once called Fire Square reflecting the violent history.

    It was well known as the site of military parades demonstrating to the world the might of the Soviet armed forces. Today I am not sure if they still use Red Square for military parade. When I was there it was showing sport exhibition.

    Red Square is a favorite destination for overseas as well as Russian tourist.

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    Exploring Red Square

    by hunterV Updated Jun 14, 2012

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    The State Department Store GUM is to the right
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    Each time I stayed in Moscow I tried not to miss exploring Red Square and visiting the Central Department store.
    I remember visiting the Kremlin and studying its history, enjoying the view of its towers.

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  • JuliaMac's Profile Photo

    Ice skating rink and New Year tree on Red Square.

    by JuliaMac Updated Dec 14, 2011

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    Ice skating rink and New Year tree on Red Square. If you want , you can skating in the winter on Red Square. Here New Year's show will be too. And on December, 31st many people will meet New Year under peal of bells.

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    An evening in Red Square

    by gordonilla Written Oct 1, 2011

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    Square (1)
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    This was an evening visit to Red square with two colleagues. It was a pleasant walk and the streets were quite full with people - locals and foreigners.

    Sadly we missed the opening hours of many of the tourist attractions. However it was well worth going to see the Square; I can now say I have been!!

    The odd thing I saw was the fact that the square is in fact not flat, but seems to be on a hill.

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  • The Red Square

    by nicolezhamnov Written Sep 21, 2011

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    The Red Square, also known as Красная площадь, was built toward the end of the 15th century. The Red Square is known as the center of not only Moscow City, but also Russia itself. Two buildings pinpointed on the Red Square area are The Kremlin Wall (Московский Кремль) and The Saint Basil’s Cathedral (Собор Василия Блаженного). The two monuments stated above are ones that indubitably need to be visited. Although many expect The Red Square to be lively, riotous, and congested, many vacate to be unsatisfied. What some do not understand is that The Red Square is a rather historical, emotional and riveting site.
    The Kremlin Wall, Московский Кремль, is a bricked red wall that indicates and borders The Red Square. To the south of the Kremlin Wall is the Moscow River, the Saint Basil’s Cathedral is to the east and the Alexander Garden is to the west. On the four corners of The Kremlin bricked wall, there are towers with golden stars at the peek. At first one comes to think that these four golden stars have no importance behind them, however they come to perceive that the four stars have great historic symbolical meaning that is vital to The Red Square. When walking past The Kremlin walls and inhaling the historical information, there is no other emotion that over comes your body besides shock curiosity and the desire to gain more information.
    The Russian Orthodox Church located at the entrance of The Red Square is known as the Saint Basil’s Cathedral. The Saint Basil’s Cathedral is also known as The Cathedral of the Protection of Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat. This church was known to be one of the towering buildings in Russia, until the Ivan the Great Bell Tower was built. Inside the Cathedral, you will find a substantial amount of Russian Icons. One may obtain a tour guide to reveal the historical information of the different parts within the church. Although some continue to come to this church to pray to god and light candles in front of the icons, the Saint Basil’s Cathedral is mainly congested with tourists eager to sight the inner objects and designs, as well as acquire the historical background and meaning. The outer shape of The Saint Basil’s Cathedral is said to be a bonfire flame rising into the sky.
    The Red Square being such a momentous and historical landmark over all, it entitles that visitation and education of The Red Square is needed. The information gained on the visit is not repetitive and uninteresting, but rather life changing and captivating. Also, with The Red Square containing monuments of importance, like The Saint Basil’s Cathedral and The Kremlin Wall, one looses nothing if only gazing at the allure and details of the monuments.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Red Square

    by kris-t Updated Sep 9, 2011

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    As ancient chronicles assert, the Red Square appeared at the end of 15th century, when Ivan III ordered to ruin all wooden buildings, surrounding the Kremlin and threatening with the fire, and to allot this area for a market.

    That's how the first name of the square - Trade Square ("Torgovaya") appeared. However, in 16th century the Square was renamed into "Troitskaya (Trinity) Square" after the Church of Saint Trinity. Later the Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed was erected at the place of St. Trinity Church.

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  • Pyotr_Pushkin's Profile Photo

    Red Square and the Kremlin

    by Pyotr_Pushkin Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Built in the 1530's, Red Square (which got it's name from the Russian word Krasnaya which originally meant dominant or beautiful and then became to mean Red) is always a good starting point. Not least because it is home to the most famous of all Cathedrals - St. Basil's; the one with nine multi-coloured domes. Inside St Basil's, every square inch of wall-space is either painted or covered with icons. Built in 1555-60 to celebrate a victory over the Kazan Khanate, the interior is pretty dark and gloomy; contrasting the bright colorful exterior.

    The Square is also home to Vladimir Lenin's Mausoleum. Erected in 1930, six years after his death, against his wishes, and made of dark red granite and black labrodorite, the is a necrophilia's delight. The interior is dark and the passage is not sure-footed. Talking and stopping to look more carefully is strictly verbotten. Militia men "shhhh" aggressively and stand on guard on all corners.

    Rumour has it that Lenin is quietly rotting, hence less and less of his body is uncovered as time passes; some say parts of his body are being replaced with wax substitutes. Behind this building are the graves of famous past party and state leaders, busts and tombstones; Stalin, Lenin's wife and sister, the first man in space (Yuri Gaarin) the writer Maxim Gorky, and the American author John Reed author of the October Revolution account 'The Ten Days That Shook the World' . Joseph Stalin's bust always attracts the most flowers. 

    Next to the Square is the Kremlin which houses state buildings, residences and plenty more Cathedrals. The Kremlin is surrounded by a triangular mile-and-a-half long red brick wall, whose width varies up to 21 feet thick! There are four gates and twenty towers, some of which are tipped with ruby stars which are lit from within and shone 24 hours a day. One of the Cathedrals, Archangel Michael is home to the burial site of Ivan the Terrible, who was exhumed in 1963 so that artists could more accurately sculpt him. That's outrageous!

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    RED SQUARE

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 11, 2011

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    RED SQUARE
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    This was at the top of my "to do" list. I was a bit disappointed as I thought it was going to be a busy square with a lot going on but it was quiet and laid back.
    I sat in a cafe on the square and ordered a latte. After waiting 20 minutes and having to ask twice, I still did not have a latte. I eventually bought one from a small cafe in Gum.

    We went back to visit Red Square at night but unfortunately the police had blocked it off. We did not find out why until we went around the other side of St Basil’s to take photos. A tank [I hadn’t seen this until I started to video] moved around and started shooting. I thought it was real ammo and ran away.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Red square

    by kris-t Updated Feb 24, 2011

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    In Russia the same object might have several names. Thus, The Red Square was officially given its modern name in 19th century, though the name was mentioned in the documents of 17th century. Different centuries left their traces:15th century gave the Kremlin's Wall with Spasskaya, Senatskaya and Nikolskaya towers;
    16th - Place of execution. (Lobnoe mesto) - it's a prevailing MISTAKE... no one person was executed on this place.... that place was made for a proclaiming acts ONLY, for execution every time was build a new wood scaffold;
    and the Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed; 19th century - the monument to Minin and Pozharsky, the building of Historical museum and Upper Trade Rows (GUM), 20th century - Lenin's Mausoleum.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Red Square -any time of the Day!

    by mallyak Updated Nov 30, 2010

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    Located on the site of the city’s old market place, over the years Red Square has acted as Moscow's equivalent to ancient Rome's Forum - a vast meeting place for the people. It has been a place for celebrating religious festivals, for public gatherings, for listening to Government announcements or Tsars’ addresses, and even watching executions (various political dissidents were publicly butchered here by Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great). The square has also been the scene of more than one display of Russian military might – the most notable of which was in 1941 when lines of Russian tanks rolled through on their way to a front-line confrontation with the Germans. It provided a much needed boost to Russians’ morale in their greatest hour of danger

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