Red Square - Kazan Cathedral, Moscow

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  • Red Square - Kazan Cathedral
    by elpariente
  • Red Square - Kazan Cathedral
    by elpariente
  • Red Square - Kazan Cathedral
    by fachd
  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Catedral de - Kazan - Cathedral

    by elpariente Updated Sep 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    En la parte norte de la Plaza Roja, cerca de la puerta de la Resurección se construyó una catedral para conmemorar expulsión de los Polacos bajo la advocación de la virgen de Kazan .
    Es uno de los iconos más venerados en Moscú
    La iglesia ha sido destruida y reconstruida muchas veces , la que visitamos es la primera reconstrucción que se hizo, con todo rigor basándose en los planos y las fotos antiguas, en el periodo post-soviético de Moscú
    Cuando la visitamos había un servicio y nos gustó mucho la coral que estaba cantando

    On the North side of the Red Square, near the Resurrection Gate, a cathedral was built to commemorate the expulsion of the Poles, under the title of Our Lady of Kazan.
    It is one of the most revered icons in Moscow
    The church has been destroyed and rebuilt many times, the one we visit now is the first reconstruction done, rigorously based on drawings and old photos, in the post-soviet Moscow
    When we visited the Cathedral there was a service and we enjoyed the choir that was singing

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by fachd Written Jul 3, 2012

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    Kazan Cathedral is located on the northeast corner of Red Square not far from Iberian gate. What you see today is not the original. The original was demolished in 1936 by Communist authority Joseph Stalin. It was decided to rebuild the cathedral in 1980 and the replica was completed in 1993.

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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    "Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan"

    by gordonilla Updated Oct 2, 2011

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    Exterior
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    There are two Cathedrals with this name - this is the one located in Moscow, next door to the Kremlin and St Basil's Cathedral. Sadly we were unable to visit the interior although it was open when we visisted the area at a little before 21.00.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by kris-t Updated Sep 29, 2011

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    Kazan Cathedral inside
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    Kazan Cathedral on the corner of Nikolskaya ulitsa, was torn down between the world wars only to be recreated in 1933 using blueprints secretly made decades earlier by Pyotr Baranovskiy, the architect who risked his life to save St Basil`s.

    The original Kazan cathedral was built in 1636 and was dedicated to the Virgin of Kazan - the victory over the polish invaders.

    In 1936 the cathedral was demolished.

    In 1990 the reconstruction according to all existing measurements started and ended in 1993. This is the example of reconstruction of the old cathedral demolished in the Soviet time.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of the Kazan Icons

    by mikey_e Written Jul 14, 2008

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    Sobor Kazanskykh ikoney
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    The Cathedral of the Kazan Icons of the Mother of God (Sobor Kazanskikh Ikoney Bozhiey Materi) is a second church in Red Square, decided smaller but no less impressive than St. Basil's. It is tucked away next to GUM and on the opposite side of the Square from Lenin's Tomb, and has a spectacular combination of a gold dome and innumerable (probably something like 16) arched vaults that pile on top of the entrance to the Church. The interior is equally awe-inspiring, as it contains many, many icons, both new and old, that highlight the beauty and intricacy of Russian iconography. The Church is in fact quite small, and can get a bit crowded at time (not because of tourists, but because of the faithful). I have particularly vivid memories of the Church during Mass. It was packed out the door and the incense was quite thick. The small interior helps to ensure that the mass sung reverberates and fills your ears (as do the many speakers that broadcast mass to the Square and surrounding streets). Remember that Orthodox churches have fairly strict dress rules, as men should have at least short sleeves and slacks and women should be in skirts and have their heads covered.

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by MikeAtSea Written Apr 7, 2008

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    Kazan Cathedral
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    The original Kazan Cathedral was built in 1636 in honor of the Kazanskaya Icon and to commemorate Tsar Mikhail Romanov's victory over the Poles and Lithuanians in 1612. Unfortunately, like most of the churches in Moscow, Kazan Cathedral was destroyed by the Bolsheviks, ironically on the very same day in 1936 that the church was meant to celebrate its 300th anniversary.
    Today, Kazan Cathedral boasts a pink and white exterior replete with the ornate window frames and gables characteristic of early Muscovite church architecture, and crowned by a cluster of green and gold domes. The church was re-opened on November 4th 1993 on the celebration day of the Icon of Kazan and has been hosting regular services ever since.

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by brazwhazz Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Kazan Cathedral

    The small Kazan Cathedral, originally founded in 1636, was destroyed in 1936 to make way for the large worker and military parades held at Red Square. In 1993, it became the first church to be completely rebuilt after having been destroyed during the Communist period.

    The reconstructed building is said to be very close to the original design, thanks to the measurements and photographs of Peter Baranovsky, a Russian restorer who worked on the renovation of the cathedral from 1929 to 1932 (and who unsuccessfully campaigned against its destruction a mere 4 years later!).

    Admission inside Kazan Cathedral, which is open daily from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., is free. The highlight of the interior is the "Virgin of Kazan" icon, even though it is only a copy of the original that was stolen from the cathedral in 1904.

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  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Kazan cathedral

    by el_ruso Written Jul 13, 2007

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    The Kazan cathedral (sobor kazanskoy bogomateri) was completed in 1636 to commemorate the liberation of Russia from Poland in 1612. Its icon was carried into battle with Poles by prince Pozharsky, the leader of the Russian liberation army.

    Communists tore it down in the 1930s despite a very extensive restoration completed in 1930 and replaced it with a public toilet. The Cathedral was rebuilt in 1993.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Kazan cathedral...Virgin Mary in a girls dream

    by kenyneo Updated Mar 24, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Kazanskaya Icon is one of the city's most precious icons and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl, to whom legend has it the Virgin Mary appeared three times in dreams to tell her of the miracle-working icon's location.

    Unfortunately, like most of the churches in Moscow, Kazan Cathedral was destroyed by the Bolsheviks, ironically on the very same day in 1936 that the church was meant to celebrate its 300th anniversary. If it has not been for the courageous efforts of the architect Baranovsky, who was also responsible for saving St. Basil's Cathedral from destruction and who made secret plans of Kazan Cathedral even as the building was being torn down, there would be no replica standing on the site today.

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by tini58de Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    Kazan Cathedral

    When I visited Moscow for the first time, this cathedral was not there. So you can imagine how surprised I was when I revisited in 1999! This church was re-opened in November 1993 and is a replica of the 17th century church built in honor of the Kazanskaya Icon. The Kazan Cathedral was to commemorate Tsar Mikhail Romanov's victory over the Poles and Lithuanians in 1612.

    Today regular services are held inside the church.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    kazan cathedral

    by doug48 Written Jul 18, 2006

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    kazan cathedral

    kazan cathedral located on red square is a replica of the original building built in 1637. in 1936 stalin had the original cathedral demolished. this cathedral held the icon of the kazan virgin. the icon was stolen in 1904.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by sue_stone Written Sep 19, 2005

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    The man playing the bells!
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    Kazan Cathedral is located just outside Resurrection Gate, close to Red Square.

    It is actually a replica of the original – this one was built in 1993…the 1636 original was demolished as it got in the road of parades…

    It is free to enter – and definitely worth a look, as it is a pretty little place.

    Even better though, is to stop by throughout the day when the church bells chime…as there is still a man who manually rings the bells, and you can see him banging away – hope he has his ear plugs in!!

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  • xxgirasolexx's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by xxgirasolexx Updated Jul 26, 2005

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    Kazanskiy sobor

    This cathedral is a replica of the one that was demolished in 1936. In 1637, the original Kazan Cathedral was consecrated and held the Icon of the Kazan Virgin. The Icon holds importance because it accompanied Prince Dmitry Pozharsky during his victorious campaign. The Icon of the Kazan Virgin housed in the Cathedral today is a copy since the original was stolen in 1904.

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  • luiggi's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by luiggi Written Nov 20, 2004
    Kazan Cathedral

    The original Kazan Cathedral was built in 1636 in honor of the Kazanskaya Icon and to commemorate Tsar Mikhail Romanov's victory over the Poles and Lithuanians in 1612. The Kazanskaya Icon is one of the city's most precious icons and was discovered by a 9-year-old girl, to whom legend has it the Virgin Mary appeared three times in dreams to tell her of the miracle-working icon's location.
    Today, Kazan Cathedral boasts a pink and white exterior replete with the ornate window frames and gables characteristic of early Muscovite church architecture, and crowned by a cluster of green and gold domes. The church was re-opened on November 4th 1993 on the celebration day of the Icon of Kazan and has been hosting regular services ever since.

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Kazan Cathedral

    by Sharrie Updated Jan 4, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Antiquity

    Can u believe it? We are still at the Red Square!
    This square is gigantic!

    KAZAN CATHEDRAL is dimunitive relative to all those buildings described earlier. It is however, quite an important one.
    It housed the Icon of the Kazan Virgin back in 1637 (the original building, this one is a replica).
    The original icon is now in St. Petersburg.

    The icon was reveled as it was the one that had accompanied the prince during the defeat of the invading Poles.
    (See earlier tips on the Time of Troubles.)

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